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Nephrops norvegicus

Norway lobsterlangoustinelangoustines
Also, langostinos are sometimes confused with langoustines (Norway lobster).
Nephrops norvegicus, known variously as the Norway lobster, Dublin Bay prawn, langoustine (compare langostino) or scampi, is a slim, orange-pink lobster which grows up to 25 cm long, and is "the most important commercial crustacean in Europe".

Squat lobster

Chirostylidaegalatheid crabgalatheid crabs
In the United States, it is commonly used in the restaurant trade to refer to the meat of the squat lobster, which is neither a true lobster nor a prawn. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration allows "langostino" to be used as a market name for three species of squat lobster in the family Galatheidae: Cervimunida johni, Munida gregaria, and Pleuroncodes monodon.
Flesh from these animals is often commercially sold in restaurants as "langostino" or sometimes dishonestly called "lobster" when incorporated in seafood dishes.

Red Lobster

In February 2016, Red Lobster was revealed to have been substituting the less-expensive langostino for lobster.
In February 2016, Red Lobster was exposed for using less expensive langostino, along with Maine lobster, in their lobster bisque recipe.

Rubio's Coastal Grill

RubioRalph RubioRubio's Fresh Mexican Grill
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge made no decisions in April 2006 on the matter when a class-action lawsuit was brought against Rubio's Restaurants, Inc., for selling "lobster burrito" and "lobster taco" that were in fact made with squat lobster.
In 2005, a class action lawsuit was brought against the company complaining that the "Lobster Burrito" offered at the restaurant contained squat lobster (also known as Langostino) rather than clawed lobster from the family Nephropidae.

Spanish language

SpanishSpanish-languageCastilian
Langostino is a Spanish word with different meanings in different areas. In Cuba and other Spanish-speaking Caribbean islands, the name langostino is also used to refer to crayfish.

Lobster

lobstersNephropidaeClawed lobster
In the United States, it is commonly used in the restaurant trade to refer to the meat of the squat lobster, which is neither a true lobster nor a prawn.

Prawn

prawnsking prawnking prawns
In the United States, it is commonly used in the restaurant trade to refer to the meat of the squat lobster, which is neither a true lobster nor a prawn. In Spain, it means some species of prawns.

Porcelain crab

Porcellanidaeporcelain
Squat lobsters are more closely related to porcelain and hermit crabs.

Hermit crab

hermit crabsPaguroideahermit-crabbed
Squat lobsters are more closely related to porcelain and hermit crabs.

Crustacean

Crustaceacrustaceanscarcinology
Crustaceans labeled as langostino are no more than 3 in long, and weigh no more than 7 oz.

Spiny lobster

rock lobsterPalinuridaelobster
Langostinos are not langoustes (spiny lobsters) despite a similar name (in Spanish, lobster is called langosta).

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration allows "langostino" to be used as a market name for three species of squat lobster in the family Galatheidae: Cervimunida johni, Munida gregaria, and Pleuroncodes monodon.

Food and Drug Administration

FDAU.S. Food and Drug AdministrationUnited States Food and Drug Administration
In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration allows "langostino" to be used as a market name for three species of squat lobster in the family Galatheidae: Cervimunida johni, Munida gregaria, and Pleuroncodes monodon. The Federal Trade Commission ultimately launched an investigation into deceptive advertising practices by the chain, because Food and Drug Administration regulations require that anyone marketing langostino as lobster must place the qualifier "langostino" adjacent to the word "lobster," and Long John Silver's not only failed to do this, but ran a television commercial making use of an American lobster in a manner that the Commission concluded was contributing to the misperception that the product was American lobster.

Galatheidae

Galatheidgalatheid crabs
In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration allows "langostino" to be used as a market name for three species of squat lobster in the family Galatheidae: Cervimunida johni, Munida gregaria, and Pleuroncodes monodon.

Cervimunida johni

In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration allows "langostino" to be used as a market name for three species of squat lobster in the family Galatheidae: Cervimunida johni, Munida gregaria, and Pleuroncodes monodon.

Pleuroncodes monodon

P. monodon
In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration allows "langostino" to be used as a market name for three species of squat lobster in the family Galatheidae: Cervimunida johni, Munida gregaria, and Pleuroncodes monodon.

Cuba

Republic of CubaCubanCUB
In Cuba and other Spanish-speaking Caribbean islands, the name langostino is also used to refer to crayfish.

Caribbean

the CaribbeanWest IndiesWest Indian
In Cuba and other Spanish-speaking Caribbean islands, the name langostino is also used to refer to crayfish.

Crayfish

crawfishfreshwater crayfishyabbies
In Cuba and other Spanish-speaking Caribbean islands, the name langostino is also used to refer to crayfish.

Long John Silver's

Long John SilversLong John Silver's Restaurants
In March 2006, Long John Silver's garnered controversy by offering a dish they called "Buttered Lobster Bites" without making it clear in its advertising that these were made from "langostino lobster."

Federal Trade Commission

FTCU.S. Federal Trade CommissionUnited States Federal Trade Commission
The Federal Trade Commission ultimately launched an investigation into deceptive advertising practices by the chain, because Food and Drug Administration regulations require that anyone marketing langostino as lobster must place the qualifier "langostino" adjacent to the word "lobster," and Long John Silver's not only failed to do this, but ran a television commercial making use of an American lobster in a manner that the Commission concluded was contributing to the misperception that the product was American lobster.