Languages of Mexico

indigenous languageindigenous languagesindigenous languages of Mexicoindigenous language of Mexicoindigenous Mexican languageIndigenous Mexican LanguagesMexicanIndian languageindigenous languages in Mexicoindigenous linguistic groups
Many different languages are spoken in Mexico.wikipedia
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Indigenous peoples of Mexico

indigenousindigenous people of Mexicoindigenous people
Some immigrant and indigenous populations are bilingual, while some indigenous people are monolingual in their languages.
The category of indigena (indigenous) can be defined narrowly according to linguistic criteria including only persons that speak one of Mexico's 89 indigenous languages, this is the categorization used by the National Mexican Institute of Statistics.

Otomi language

OtomiOtomianOtomí
Otomi (Spanish: Otomí ) is a group of closely related indigenous languages of Mexico, spoken by approximately 240,000 indigenous Otomi people in the central altiplano region of Mexico.

Nahuatl

Nahuatl languageNáhuatlNahua
The only single indigenous language spoken by more than a million people in Mexico is the Nahuatl language; the other Native American language with a large population of native speakers include Yucatec Maya.
Under Mexico's General Law of Linguistic Rights of the Indigenous Peoples promulgated in 2003, Nahuatl and the other 63 indigenous languages of Mexico are recognized as lenguas nacionales ("national languages") in the regions where they are spoken, enjoying the same status as Spanish within their regions.

Mazahua language

MazahuaEastern MazahuaEastern Mazahua language
The Mazahua language is an indigenous language of Mexico, spoken in the country's central states by the ethnic group that is widely known as the Mazahua but calls itself the Hñatho.

Tlapanec language

TlapanecTlapanecoAcatepec Me’phaa
Tlapanec, or Meꞌphaa, is an indigenous Mexican language spoken by more than 98,000 Tlapanec people in the state of Guerrero.

Huichol language

Huicholhchtheir language
The Huichol language is an indigenous language of Mexico which belongs to the Uto-Aztecan language family.

Cora language

CoracokCora languages
Cora is an indigenous language of Mexico of the Uto-Aztecan language family.

Mexico

MexicanMéxicoMEX
Many different languages are spoken in Mexico.
The federal government officially recognizes sixty-eight linguistic groups and 364 varieties of indigenous languages.

Chichimeca Jonaz language

Chichimeca JonazChichimecChichimec language
Chichimeca or Chichimeca Jonaz is an indigenous language of Mexico spoken by around 200 Chichimeca Jonaz people in Misión de Chichimecas near San Luis de la Paz in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico.

Americas

Americathe AmericasAmerican
That is the second-largest group in the Americas after Peru.

Instituto Nacional de Lenguas Indígenas

INALINational Institute of Indigenous LanguagesInstituto Nacional de Lenguas Indigenas
Note that, as defined by mutual intelligibility, the number of spoken languages in Mexico is much greater than the 63 national languages, because National Institute of Indigenous Languages (INALI) counts distinct ethnic groups for the purposes of political classification. According to the Commission for the Development of Indigenous Peoples (CDI) and National Institute of Indigenous Languages (INALI), while 10–14% of the population identifies as belonging to an indigenous group, around 6% speak an indigenous language.
INALI works to promote and protect the use of Mexico's indigenous languages, which it divides into 68 living "linguistic groups" and hundreds of "linguistic varieties".

Mayan languages

MayanMayan languageMaya
In 1996, Guatemala formally recognized 21 Mayan languages by name, and Mexico recognizes eight more within its territory.

Mestizos in Mexico

mestizoMestizosgovernment ideology
"Indigenous people’s disadvantaged socioeconomic status and the pressure of assimilation into mestizo or Ladino society have been influential on indigenous language loss."

Language

languageslinguisticlinguistic diversity
Many different languages are spoken in Mexico.

Mexican Sign Language

mfs
Mexican Sign Language is spoken by much of the deaf population, and there are one or two indigenous sign languages as well.

Language family

language familiesfamilyLanguage families and languages
The Law of Linguistic Rights establishes Spanish as one of the country's national languages, along with 63 distinct indigenous languages (from seven large families, plus four counted as language isolates).

Language isolate

isolateisolateslanguage isolates
The Law of Linguistic Rights establishes Spanish as one of the country's national languages, along with 63 distinct indigenous languages (from seven large families, plus four counted as language isolates).

Mutual intelligibility

mutually intelligiblemutually unintelligibleintelligible
Note that, as defined by mutual intelligibility, the number of spoken languages in Mexico is much greater than the 63 national languages, because National Institute of Indigenous Languages (INALI) counts distinct ethnic groups for the purposes of political classification.

Mixtec

MixtecsMixtec peopleMixteca
For instance, the Mixtec are a single ethnicity and therefore count as a single language for governmental/legal purposes, but there are a dozen distinct Mixtec dialect regions, each of which includes at least one variety that is not mutually intelligible with those of the other dialect regions (Josserand, 1983), and Ethnologue counts 52 varieties of Mixtec that require separate literature.

National Institute of Indigenous Peoples

CDINational Commission for the Development of Indigenous PeoplesInstituto Nacional Indigenista
According to the Commission for the Development of Indigenous Peoples (CDI) and National Institute of Indigenous Languages (INALI), while 10–14% of the population identifies as belonging to an indigenous group, around 6% speak an indigenous language.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Besides Spanish, the most populous are probably English, German (Plautdietsch), Arabic, Chinese and Japanese.

Plautdietsch language

PlautdietschMennonite Low GermanLow German
Besides Spanish, the most populous are probably English, German (Plautdietsch), Arabic, Chinese and Japanese.

Philip II of Spain

Philip IIKing Philip IIPhilip
Philip II of Spain decreed in 1570 that Nahuatl become the official language of the colonies of New Spain in order to facilitate communication between the natives of the colonies.