Languages of Singapore

four official languagesofficial languagesofficial languages of Singapore4 diverse linguistic landscapemain languages spoken at homenational languageOtherSingaporeSingapore's four official languages
According to Constitution of Singapore, the national language of Singapore is Malay, which plays a symbolic role, as Malays are constitutionally recognized as the indigenous peoples of Singapore, and it is the government's duty to protect their language and heritage.wikipedia
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Malay language

MalayBahasa MelayuMalay-language
According to Constitution of Singapore, the national language of Singapore is Malay, which plays a symbolic role, as Malays are constitutionally recognized as the indigenous peoples of Singapore, and it is the government's duty to protect their language and heritage. “The national language shall be the Malay language and shall be in the Roman script […]” (Constitution of the Republic of Singapore, PART XIII) Also according to the constitution, the four commonly used languages of Singapore are English, Chinese, Malay and Tamil. In the early years, the lingua franca of the island was Bazaar Malay (Melayu Pasar), a creole of Malay and Chinese, the language of trade in the Malay Archipelago.
Malay (Bahasa Melayu, بهاس ملايو) is an Austronesian language spoken in Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore, as well as parts of Thailand.

Singapore

Republic of SingaporeSingapore CitySingaporean
According to Constitution of Singapore, the national language of Singapore is Malay, which plays a symbolic role, as Malays are constitutionally recognized as the indigenous peoples of Singapore, and it is the government's duty to protect their language and heritage.
There are four official languages of Singapore: English, Malay, Mandarin Chinese, and Tamil; most Singaporeans are bilingual, with English serving as the nation's lingua franca, while Malay is the national language.

Standard Chinese

MandarinChineseMandarin Chinese
Hokkien (Min Nan) briefly emerged as a lingua franca among the Chinese, but by the late 20th century they had been eclipsed by Mandarin. Despite government efforts to promote Mandarin through the Speak Mandarin Campaign, the propagation of Mandarin and Chinese culture amongst Chinese Singaporeans continues to be a challenge because Mandarin faces stiff competition from the strong presence of English.
Standard Singaporean Mandarin is one of the four official languages of Singapore.

Varieties of Chinese

ChineseSiniticChinese varieties
Other Chinese varieties such as Hokkien, Teochew, Hakka, Hainanese and Cantonese have been classified by the Government as "dialects", and language policies and language attitudes based on this classification and discouragement of usage in Non-Mandarin Chinese or "Chinese dialects" in official settings and television media have led to a decrease in the number of speakers of these varieties.
Standard Singaporean Mandarin is one of the four official languages of Singapore.

Singaporean Hokkien

HokkienSingaporefrom the Hokkien dialect
Hokkien (Min Nan) briefly emerged as a lingua franca among the Chinese, but by the late 20th century they had been eclipsed by Mandarin.

Singdarin

Colloquial Singaporean MandarinColloquial
In particular, Singapore has its own lect of Mandarin; Singaporean Mandarin, itself with two varieties, Standard and Colloquial or spoken.

Speak Good English Movement

Speak Good Englishofficial discouragement
In an attempt to eradicate the usage of Singlish, the government then began the Speak Good English Movement, encouraging people to use Standard Singaporean English in all contexts instead.
The port attracted migrants from neighbouring countries, such as China and India, resulting in a diverse linguistic landscape.

Singaporean Mandarin

MandarinSingapore MandarinChinese
In particular, Singapore has its own lect of Mandarin; Singaporean Mandarin, itself with two varieties, Standard and Colloquial or spoken.

Mandarin Chinese

MandarinChineseMandarin dialects
Some examples of the different ways in which popular tourist attractions in Singapore display ethnolinguistic diversity can be seen at tourist attractions such as Lau Pa Sat, where the words "Lau Pa Sat" on the directory boards consist of the Mandarin Chinese word lau for "old" (老;lăo) and from the Hokkien words pa sat for "market" (巴刹;bā sha), written in roman script.
Standard Chinese is the official language of the People's Republic of China and Taiwan and one of the four official languages of Singapore.

Speak Mandarin Campaign

deliberate policy to encourage MandarinPinyinizationprogramme to promote Mandarin
Despite government efforts to promote Mandarin through the Speak Mandarin Campaign, the propagation of Mandarin and Chinese culture amongst Chinese Singaporeans continues to be a challenge because Mandarin faces stiff competition from the strong presence of English.

Singlish

Singapore Colloquial Englishcolloquial Singaporean EnglishEnglish
There has been a continuous debate between the general Singaporean population and the Government with regard to the status of Singlish in local domains.

Constitution of Singapore

ConstitutionConstitution of the Republic of SingaporeRendel Constitution
According to Constitution of Singapore, the national language of Singapore is Malay, which plays a symbolic role, as Malays are constitutionally recognized as the indigenous peoples of Singapore, and it is the government's duty to protect their language and heritage.

Malays (ethnic group)

MalayMalaysMalay people
According to Constitution of Singapore, the national language of Singapore is Malay, which plays a symbolic role, as Malays are constitutionally recognized as the indigenous peoples of Singapore, and it is the government's duty to protect their language and heritage.

Indigenous peoples

indigenousindigenous peopleaboriginal
According to Constitution of Singapore, the national language of Singapore is Malay, which plays a symbolic role, as Malays are constitutionally recognized as the indigenous peoples of Singapore, and it is the government's duty to protect their language and heritage.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
“The national language shall be the Malay language and shall be in the Roman script […]” (Constitution of the Republic of Singapore, PART XIII) Also according to the constitution, the four commonly used languages of Singapore are English, Chinese, Malay and Tamil.

Chinese language

ChineseChinese:Regional dialect
“The national language shall be the Malay language and shall be in the Roman script […]” (Constitution of the Republic of Singapore, PART XIII) Also according to the constitution, the four commonly used languages of Singapore are English, Chinese, Malay and Tamil.

Tamil language

TamilTamil-languageta
“The national language shall be the Malay language and shall be in the Roman script […]” (Constitution of the Republic of Singapore, PART XIII) Also according to the constitution, the four commonly used languages of Singapore are English, Chinese, Malay and Tamil.

Demographics of Singapore

SingaporeanSingapore2013 Population White Paper
The three languages other than English were chosen to correspond with the major ethnic groups present in Singapore at the time: Mandarin had gained status since the introduction of Chinese-medium schools; Malay was deemed the "most obvious choice" for the Malay community; and Tamil for the largest Indian ethnic group in Singapore, in addition to being "the language with the longest history of education in Malaysia and Singapore".

Language

languageslinguisticlinguistic diversity
In 2009, more than 20 languages were identified as being spoken in Singapore, reflecting a rich linguistic diversity in the city.

Early history of Singapore

Pre-colonialpre-colonial Singaporeroots as a trading settlement
Singapore's historical roots as a trading settlement gave rise to an influx of foreign traders, and their languages were slowly embedded in Singapore's modern day linguistic repertoire.

Lingua franca

trade languagecommon languagelingua francas
Hokkien (Min Nan) briefly emerged as a lingua franca among the Chinese, but by the late 20th century they had been eclipsed by Mandarin. In the early years, the lingua franca of the island was Bazaar Malay (Melayu Pasar), a creole of Malay and Chinese, the language of trade in the Malay Archipelago. English became the lingua franca due to British rule of Singapore, and was made the main language upon Singaporean independence.

Creole language

creolecreolescreole languages
In the early years, the lingua franca of the island was Bazaar Malay (Melayu Pasar), a creole of Malay and Chinese, the language of trade in the Malay Archipelago.

Malay Archipelago

MalayaIndonesian ArchipelagoIndo-Australian Archipelago
In the early years, the lingua franca of the island was Bazaar Malay (Melayu Pasar), a creole of Malay and Chinese, the language of trade in the Malay Archipelago.

Colony of Singapore

SingaporeCrown Colony of Singaporepost-war Singapore
English became the lingua franca due to British rule of Singapore, and was made the main language upon Singaporean independence.

History of the Republic of Singapore

Singapore's independenceindependenceSingapore's independence from Malaysia
English became the lingua franca due to British rule of Singapore, and was made the main language upon Singaporean independence.