Languages of the Philippines

Philippine languagesLanguagesPhilippine languagePhilippinesFilipino languageslanguagelanguage of the Philippineslanguages in the Philippineslinguisticlocal language
There are some 120 to 187 languages and dialects in the Philippines, depending on the method of classification.wikipedia
440 Related Articles

Filipino language

FilipinoTagalogSpoken languages
The 1987 Constitution declares Filipino as the national language of the country. The 1973 constitution declared the Pilipino language to be co-official, along with English, and mandated the development of a national language, to be known as Filipino.
Tagalog is among the 185 languages of the Philippines identified in the Ethnologue.

President of the Philippines

PresidentPhilippine PresidentPresidents
In 1939, President Manuel L. Quezón renamed the Tagalog language as Wikang Pambansa ("national language" in English translation).
In the other major languages of the Philippines such as the Visayan languages, Presidente is more common when Filipinos are not actually code-switching with the English word.

Pangasinan language

PangasinanPangasinensePangasinenses
The diglossia is more evident in the case of other languages such as Pangasinan, Kapampangan, Bikol, Waray, Hiligaynon, Sambal, and Maranao, where the written variant of the language is becoming less and less popular to give way to the use of Filipino.
Pangasinan (Salitan Pangasinan) is one of the major languages of the Philippines.

Kapampangan language

KapampanganPampangoKapampangan people
The diglossia is more evident in the case of other languages such as Pangasinan, Kapampangan, Bikol, Waray, Hiligaynon, Sambal, and Maranao, where the written variant of the language is becoming less and less popular to give way to the use of Filipino.
Kapampangan, Pampango, or the Pampangan language is a major Philippine language.

Ilocano language

IlocanoIlokanoIloko
Ilocano
Ilocano (also Ilokano; ; Ilocano: Pagsasao nga Ilokano) is the third most-spoken native language of the Philippines.

Latin script

LatinLatin alphabetRoman
The indigenous scripts of the Philippines (such as the Kulitan, Tagbanwa and others) are used very little; instead, Filipino languages are today written in the Latin script because of the Spanish and American colonial experience.
It is used for many Austronesian languages, including the languages of the Philippines and the Malaysian and Indonesian languages, replacing earlier Arabic and indigenous Brahmic alphabets.

Surigaonon language

SurigaononTandaganonCantilangnon dialect
Surigaonon is a Philippine regional language spoken by Surigaonon people in the province of Surigao del Norte, Dinagat Islands, Surigao del Sur, and some portions of Agusan del Norte especially the towns near the Mainit Lake, Agusan del Sur and Davao Oriental.

Spanish language

SpanishSpanish-languageCastilian
Spanish and Arabic are to be promoted on an optional and voluntary basis. Except for English, Spanish, Chavacano and varieties of Chinese (Hokkien, Cantonese and Mandarin), all of the languages belong to the Malayo-Polynesian branch of the Austronesian language family.
The local languages of the Philippines also retain some Spanish influence, with many words being derived from Mexican Spanish, owing to the administration of the islands by Spain through Mexico City until 1821, and then directly from Madrid until 1898.

Baybayin

TagalogBaybayin scriptancient Filipino writing system
Baybayin, though generally not understood, is one of the most well-known of the indigenous Filipino scripts and is used mainly in artistic applications such as on the Philippine banknotes, where the word "Pilipino" is inscribed using the writing system.
There is only one symbol for D or R as they were allophones in most languages of the Philippines, where R occurred in intervocalic positions and D occurred elsewhere.

Waray language

WarayWaray-WarayWarayan
The diglossia is more evident in the case of other languages such as Pangasinan, Kapampangan, Bikol, Waray, Hiligaynon, Sambal, and Maranao, where the written variant of the language is becoming less and less popular to give way to the use of Filipino. President Manuel L. Quezón appointed native Waray speaker Jaime C. De Veyra to chair a committee of speakers of other regional languages.
Waray is the fifth-most-spoken native regional language of the Philippines, native to Eastern Visayas.

National language

main languagenationalmajority language
The 1973 constitution declared the Pilipino language to be co-official, along with English, and mandated the development of a national language, to be known as Filipino.
The 1987 constitution designated the Filipino language, which is based on Tagalog with the inclusion of terms from all recognized languages of the Philippines, as the national language.

Hiligaynon language

HiligaynonIlonggoHiligaynon (Ilonggo)
The diglossia is more evident in the case of other languages such as Pangasinan, Kapampangan, Bikol, Waray, Hiligaynon, Sambal, and Maranao, where the written variant of the language is becoming less and less popular to give way to the use of Filipino.
Similar to many languages in the Philippines, very little research on dialectology has been done on Hiligaynon.

Austronesian languages

AustronesianAustronesian languageAustronesian language family
Except for English, Spanish, Chavacano and varieties of Chinese (Hokkien, Cantonese and Mandarin), all of the languages belong to the Malayo-Polynesian branch of the Austronesian language family.
Baybayin - used to write Tagalog and several Philippine languages.

Philippine languages

PhilippinePhilippine languageFilipino
President Manuel L. Quezón appointed native Waray speaker Jaime C. De Veyra to chair a committee of speakers of other regional languages.
Languages of the Philippines

Catholic Church in the Philippines

Roman CatholicRoman CatholicismCatholic
In this respect, its function and use is somewhat like the traditional roles of Latin and Spanish in Filipino Catholicism vis-à-vis other currently spoken languages.
Although the natives were resistant, they could not organise into a unified resistance towards the Spaniards due to geography, ethno-linguistic differences, and overall mutual indifference.

Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao

ARMMMuslim MindanaoBangsamoro
Additionally, the Arabic script is used in the Muslim areas in the southern Philippines.

Maguindanao language

MaguindanaoMaguindanaonMaguindanaoan
Maguindanao
*Languages of the Philippines

Maranao language

MaranaoMeranauIranon
The diglossia is more evident in the case of other languages such as Pangasinan, Kapampangan, Bikol, Waray, Hiligaynon, Sambal, and Maranao, where the written variant of the language is becoming less and less popular to give way to the use of Filipino.
*Languages of the Philippines

Overseas Filipinos

OFWOverseas Filipino Workersoverseas Filipino
Filipino is used as a lingua franca in all regions of the Philippines as well as within overseas Filipino communities, and is the dominant language of the armed forces (except perhaps for the small part of the commissioned officer corps from wealthy or upper-middle-class families) and of a large part of the civil service, most of whom are non-Tagalogs.

Tausug language

TausugTausūgSuluk language
Tausug
Languages of the Philippines

Cebuano language

CebuanoVisayanCebuano-speaking
This is evident in major urban areas outside Metro Manila like Camarines Norte in the Bikol-speaking area, and Davao in the Cebuano-speaking area.
Languages of the Philippines

Ibanag language

Ibanagibg
Similar to more known languages in the Philippines such as Cebuano and Tagalog, Ibanag is a Philippine language within the Austronesian language family.

Albay Bikol language

Albay BikolBuhinonAlbay Bicolano
Uban ika adto sa saod? (Libon, Albay Bikol; Libon, Albay)
*Languages of the Philippines

Central Bikol

BicolanoBikolBicol
Bikol
Like other Philippine languages, Bikol has a number of loanwords, largely Spanish as a result of 333 years of Spanish rule in the Philippines.

Karay-a language

Kinaray-aKaray-aKanaray-a
Karay-a
Languages of the Philippines