Lanong

Lanong were large outrigger warships used by the Iranun and the Banguingui people of the Philippines.wikipedia
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Piracy in the Sulu Sea

Moro piratesSulu piratesMuslim pirates
They were prominently used for piracy and slave raids from the mid-18th century to the early 19th century in most of Southeast Asia.
The pirate ships used by the Moros include various designs like the paraw, pangayaw, garay, and lanong.

Banguingui people

Banguingui
Lanong were large outrigger warships used by the Iranun and the Banguingui people of the Philippines.
The Banguingui usually sailed garay warships, in contrast to the lanong of the Iranun.

Garay (ship)

garaypanco
Like the garay and penjajap, lanong usually served as motherships to smaller salisipan war-canoes.
Garay were smaller, faster, and more maneuverable than the Iranun lanong warships.

Galley slave

galley slavesgalleysgalley-slave
They also had one to three banks of oars rowed by galley slaves.
In Southeast Asia, from the mid-18th to the late-19th centuries, the lanong and garay warships of the Iranun and Banguingui pirates were crewed entirely with male galley slaves captured from previous raids.

Kakap (boat)

Kakapsalisipan
Like the garay and penjajap, lanong usually served as motherships to smaller salisipan war-canoes.
They are usually part of fleets with larger motherships like pangajava, garay, or lanong warships.

Penjajap

pangajavapancopangayaw
Like the garay and penjajap, lanong usually served as motherships to smaller salisipan war-canoes.
In Iranun raiding fleets, they usually outpaced the slower lanong warships.

Karakoa

joangasLanong
Like the karakoa, large lanong were also inaccurately known by the Spanish as joangas or juangas (Spanish for "junk").
Lanong

Tanja sail

tanja sailstanjalayar tanja
They were rigged with tanja sails.
Lanong

History of slavery in the Muslim world

Slavery in the Muslim worldchattel slaveselsewhere in the Middle East
Unlike the captives of traditional raiders in the rest of the Philippines (who were treated as bondsmen, rather than true slaves), male captives of the Iranun and the Banguingui were treated brutally, even fellow Muslim captives were not spared.
They were usually forced to serve as galley slaves on the lanong and garay warships of their captors.

Iranun people

IranunIllanunIranuns
Lanong were large outrigger warships used by the Iranun and the Banguingui people of the Philippines.

Philippines

🇵🇭FilipinoPhilippine
Lanong were large outrigger warships used by the Iranun and the Banguingui people of the Philippines.

Shear legs

sheersshearssheerlegs
They could reach up to 30 m in length and had two biped shear masts which doubled as boarding ladders.

Exonym and endonym

exonymendonymautonym
The name lanong is derived from Lanun, an exonym of the Iranun people.

Junk (ship)

junkjunksChinese junk
Like the karakoa, large lanong were also inaccurately known by the Spanish as joangas or juangas (Spanish for "junk").

Panglima

minister
They were crewed by up to 150 to 200 men, led by a panglima (commander).

Beakhead

beak or beakheadbeak-head
The prow jutted past the keel into a beakhead that also mounted a long gun and several swivel guns.

Strait of Malacca

Malacca StraitMalacca StraitsStraits of Malacca
Lanong could sail long distances and attacked ships as far as the Straits of Malacca and Java.

Java

JavaneseJava IslandJawa
Lanong could sail long distances and attacked ships as far as the Straits of Malacca and Java.

Dutch East Indies

DutchNetherlands East IndiesEast Indies
This was spurred by the rising demand for slave labor in the Dutch East Indies as well as growing enmity between the Moro Sultanates and the European colonial powers.

Moro people

MoroMorosMoro Muslims
This was spurred by the rising demand for slave labor in the Dutch East Indies as well as growing enmity between the Moro Sultanates and the European colonial powers.

Sultanate of Sulu

SuluSultan of SuluSulu Sultanate
The raids were either mounted independently or under the orders of the Sultanate of Sulu and the Sultanate of Maguindanao, whom the Iranun and Banguingui were subjects of.

Sultanate of Maguindanao

MindanaoMaguindanaoSultan of Maguindanao
The raids were either mounted independently or under the orders of the Sultanate of Sulu and the Sultanate of Maguindanao, whom the Iranun and Banguingui were subjects of.

Alipin

oripunaliping namamahayaliping sa gigilid
Unlike the captives of traditional raiders in the rest of the Philippines (who were treated as bondsmen, rather than true slaves), male captives of the Iranun and the Banguingui were treated brutally, even fellow Muslim captives were not spared.

Tagalog people

TagalogTagalogsTagalas
Most of the slaves were Tagalogs, Visayans, and "Malays" (including Bugis, Mandarese, Iban, and Makassar).

Bugis

BugineseBuginese peopleBugis people
Most of the slaves were Tagalogs, Visayans, and "Malays" (including Bugis, Mandarese, Iban, and Makassar).