A report on Laos and Vang Pao

Vang in 2004
Pha That Luang in Vientiane is the national symbol of Laos.
Fa Ngum, founder of the Lan Xang Kingdom
Local Lao soldiers in the French Colonial guard, c. 1900
French General Salan and Prince Sisavang Vatthana in Luang Prabang, 4 May 1953
Ruins of Muang Khoun, former capital of Xiangkhouang province, destroyed by the American bombing of Laos in the late 1960s
Pathet Lao soldiers in Vientiane, 1972
Mekong River flowing through Luang Prabang
Paddy fields in Laos
Laos map of Köppen climate classification.
Flag of the ruling Lao People's Revolutionary Party
Prime Minister Thongloun Sisoulith with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and ASEAN heads of state in New Delhi on 25 January 2018
Prime Minister Thongloun Sisoulith with Russian President Vladimir Putin in 2016
Hmong girls in Laos, 1973
A proportional representation of Laos exports, 2019
GDP per capita development in Laos
Near the sanctuary on the main upper level of Vat Phou, looking back towards the Mekong River
Rivers are an important means of transport in Laos.
Pha That Luang in Vientiane. The Buddhist stupa that is a national symbol of Laos.
Mahosot Hospital in Vientiane.
National University of Laos in Vientiane.
An example of Lao cuisine
Lao women wearing sinhs
Lao dancers during the New Year celebration
New Laos National Stadium in Vientiane.
Wat Nong Sikhounmuang - buddhist pagoda in Luang Prabang.

Vang, an ethnic Hmong, was born on 8 December 1929, in a Hmong village named Nonghet, located in Central Xiangkhuang Province, in the northeastern region of Laos, where his father, Neng Chu Vang, was a county leader.

- Vang Pao

The attack resulted in the RLA largely demobilising, leaving the conflict to irregular ethnic Hmong forces of the "Secret Army" backed by the United States and Thailand, and led by General Vang Pao.

- Laos

8 related topics with Alpha

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Areas of Laos controlled by the Pathet Lao and bombed by the United States Air Force in support of the Kingdom of Laos.

Laotian Civil War

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Areas of Laos controlled by the Pathet Lao and bombed by the United States Air Force in support of the Kingdom of Laos.
French General Salan and Prince Sisavang in the Lao capital, Luang Prabang, 4 May 1953
Pathet Lao soldiers in Xam Neua, 1953
The Geneva Conference of 1954.
The Ho Chi Minh trail was used by Vietnamese and Laotian people from the very beginning. Captured Viet Cong, circa 1959
The Laotian Armed Forces training Center at Khang Khai, Laos, March 1960
Anti-communist Hmong guerrilla troops in 1961.
Barrel Roll operational area, 1964
Barrel Roll and Steel Tiger operational area, 1965.
Damage caused by a communist ground attack on Luang Prabang airfield, 1967
North Vietnamese troops march through Laos, 1967
Barrel Roll, Steel Tiger and Tiger Hound operational areas.
A map of the Ho Chi Minh Trail, 1967.
A U.S. Air Force Bell UH-1P from the 20th Special Operations Squadron "Green Hornets" at a base in Laos, 1970.
A Royal Lao Air Force (RLAF) North American T-28D-5 Trojan armed trainer loaded with bombs at Long Tieng airfield in Laos, September 1972
Pathet Lao soldiers in Vientiane, Laos, 1973
Hmong woman and child at Long Tieng, Laos military base in 1973.
Laotians hired to assist U.S. troops assigned with the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command sift then move tons of dirt on a mountain near Xépôn, Laos (July 2004)
Unexploded cluster sub-munition, probably a BLU-26 type. Plain of Jars, Laos. 2012
UXO on display at a museum in Vientiane
Anti-aircraft troops of the Laotian Peoples Liberation Army.

The Laotian Civil War (1959–1975) was a civil war in Laos which was waged between the Communist Pathet Lao and the Royal Lao Government from 23 May 1959 to 2 December 1975.

The U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), in an attempt to disrupt these operations in northern Laos without direct military involvement, responded by training a guerrilla force of about thirty thousand Laotian hill tribesmen, mostly local Hmong (Meo) tribesmen along with the Mien and Khmu, led by Royal Lao Army General Vang Pao, a Hmong military leader.

Flower Hmong women in traditional dress at the market in Bắc Hà, Vietnam

Hmong people

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Flower Hmong women in traditional dress at the market in Bắc Hà, Vietnam
Likely routes of early rice transfer, and possible language family homelands (archaeological sites in China and SE Asia shown)
Red Dao in Vietnam
Hmong girls meet possible suitors while playing a ball-throwing game in Laos.
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Hmong folk costume in Sa Pa, Vietnam
A Flower Hmong woman in Vietnam
A typical rammed earth house building technique of Flower Hmong in Vietnam
Hmong people at the Can Cau market, Si Ma Cai, Vietnam
Hmong girl (aged 15) preparing wedding dress, Phố Cáo commune, Hà Giang province, Vietnam
Hmong girls in Thoeng District, Thailand
The historical migration of the Hmong according to Hmong tradition
A scene depicting the Qing dynasty's campaign against the Hmong people at Lancaoping in 1795

The Hmong people (RPA: Hmoob, Nyiakeng Puachue:, Pahawh Hmong: , ) are indigenous people that mainly live in Southwest China (Guizhou, Yunnan, Sichuan, Chongqing, and Guangxi), Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar.

During the Secret War, in the early 1960s through 1970s the word "Miao or Meo (meaning "cats", "barbarians", and even "Sons of the Soil")" was used until it was changed by General Vang Pao and Dr. Yang Dao to "Hmong", with an added "H" in front of the word "Mong."

Flag of the Pathet Lao

Pathet Lao

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Flag of the Pathet Lao
Pathet Lao at Xam Neua in 1953
Pathet Lao soldiers in Vientiane, Laos, 1973

The Pathet Lao (ປະເທດລາວ ), officially the Lao People's Liberation Army, was a communist political movement and organization in Laos, formed in the mid-20th century.

On 2 February 1971 the PAVN/Pathet Lao launched Campaign 74B temporarily capturing the Plain of Jars and shelling Long Tieng, the base of Vang Pao's RLA aligned army before withdrawing.

Royal Lao Army Service Banner (1952-1975)

Royal Lao Army

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The Land Component of the Royal Lao Armed Forces (FAR), the official military of the Kingdom of Laos during the North Vietnamese invasion of Laos and the Laotian Civil War between 1960 and 1975.

The Land Component of the Royal Lao Armed Forces (FAR), the official military of the Kingdom of Laos during the North Vietnamese invasion of Laos and the Laotian Civil War between 1960 and 1975.

Royal Lao Army Service Banner (1952-1975)
An Auto Defense de Choc (ADC) Hmong guerrilla company assembles at Phou Vieng, Spring 1961.
RLA Willys M38 MC jeep and a Jeepster Commando hardtop SUV parked at Luang Prabang airfield, 1967.
RLA M35 truck carrying Pathet Lao soldiers in Vientiane, 1973.
Royal Lao Armed Forces cap badge 1961-75

Intended to be used on internal security operations to bolster the local colonial constabulary force, the "Indigenous Guard" (Garde Indigène), the 1er BCL did not see much action until after March 9, 1945, when the Japanese Imperial Army forcibly seized control of French Indochina from France, including Laos.

Major general Vang Pao

Wat Tham Krabok

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Buddhist temple (wat) in the Phra Phutthabat District of Saraburi Province, Thailand.

Buddhist temple (wat) in the Phra Phutthabat District of Saraburi Province, Thailand.

Most had fled Laos alleging that they were persecuted by the communist government that ruled Laos since 1975.

In the late 1970s, Wat Tham Krabok, and particularly its abbot, Luang Por Chamroon, supported Hmong armed resistance against the Lao PDR government, particularly the Neo Hom led by General Vang Pao and other Laotian leaders, independent Chao Fa groups, and one sub-faction of the Chao Fa led by Pa Kao Her.

The Center for Public Policy Analysis

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Established in Washington, D.C. in 1988 and describes itself as a non-profit, non-partisan, think tank and research organization.

Established in Washington, D.C. in 1988 and describes itself as a non-profit, non-partisan, think tank and research organization.

The organization is described as an "outspoken supporter" and human rights proponent for ethnic, minority Laotian and Hmong people in Laos and Vietnam.

In 2011, the CPPA campaigned for former Hmong leader and Royal Lao Army Lieutenant General Vang Pao to be given a memorial service in Arlington National Cemetery after US authorities refused to grant him the right to be buried there.

Xiangkhouang

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Plain of Jars, girls of Houang
Map shows ethnicities distribution of Indochina peninsula in 1926, includes Laotian and Vietnamese communities settled in Xiangkhouang before 1945.
Phonsavan
A spoon seller, Ban Napia
Plain of Jars archaeological site 1
The ruins of Wat Piawat Temple and its large Buddha statue (which survived and remains to this day), which was almost completely destroyed during the First and Second Indochina Wars
Hmong girls
Bullfight, Hmong New Year
Phuan girls in traditional clothing

Xiangkhouang (Lao: ຊຽງຂວາງ, meaning 'Horizontal City') is a province of Laos on the Xiangkhoang Plateau, in the nation's northeast.

The royalists were led by General Vang Pao, who was born in the province.

Insurgency in Laos

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Ongoing low-intensity conflict between the Laotian government on one side and former members of the "Secret Army", Laotian royalists, and rebels from the Hmong and lowland Lao ethnic minorities on the other.

Ongoing low-intensity conflict between the Laotian government on one side and former members of the "Secret Army", Laotian royalists, and rebels from the Hmong and lowland Lao ethnic minorities on the other.

These groups have faced reprisals from the Lao People's Army and Vietnam People's Army for their support of the U.S.-led, anti-communist military campaigns in Laos during the Laotian Civil War, which the insurgency is an extension of itself.

Under the leadership of the General Vang Pao, Hmong forces with US support prevented the Pathet Lao and their Vietnamese backers from toppling the Kingdom of Laos.