LaserDisc

LDlaser discLaserVisionlaserdiscsLaserDisc (LD)DiscoVisionLaserDisc playerLaserdiskLDscombi player
LaserDisc (abbreviated as LD) is a home video format and the first commercial optical disc storage medium, initially licensed, sold and marketed as MCA DiscoVision in the United States in 1978.wikipedia
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Optical recording

Laserdisc technologyOptical video recording technology
Optical video recording technology, using a transparent disc, was invented by David Paul Gregg and James Russell in 1963 (and patented in 1970 and 1990).
Laserdisc technology, using a transparent disc, was invented by David Paul Gregg in 1958 (and patented in 1961 and 1990).

DiscoVision

MCA DiscoVisionDisco-VisionMCA DiscoVision Incorporated
LaserDisc (abbreviated as LD) is a home video format and the first commercial optical disc storage medium, initially licensed, sold and marketed as MCA DiscoVision in the United States in 1978.
DiscoVision is the name of several things related to the video LaserDisc format.

VHS

videoVHS tapeVHS tapes
Although the format was capable of offering higher-quality video and audio than its consumer rivals, VHS and Betamax videotape, LaserDisc never managed to gain widespread use in North America, largely due to high costs for the players and video titles themselves and the inability to record TV programs.
The earliest of these formats, LaserDisc, was not widely adopted across Europe, but was hugely popular in Japan and a minor hit in the United States.

Philips

Philips ElectronicsRoyal Philips ElectronicsPhilips Media
By 1969, Philips had developed a videodisc in reflective mode, which has advantages over the transparent mode.
Philips had developed a LaserDisc early on for selling movies, but delayed its commercial launch for fear of cannibalizing its video recorder sales.

DVD

DVD-ROMDVDsDVD-9
The technologies and concepts behind LaserDisc were the foundation for later optical disc formats including Compact Disc (CD), DVD and Blu-ray (BD). Although appearing similar to compact discs or DVDs, LaserDiscs used analog video stored in the composite domain (having a video bandwidth approximately equivalent to the 1 in C-Type VTR format) with analog FM stereo sound and PCM digital audio.
A consumer optical disc data format known as LaserDisc was developed in the United States, and first came to market in Atlanta, Georgia in December 1978.

Optical disc

optical mediaoptical data storageoptical discs
LaserDisc (abbreviated as LD) is a home video format and the first commercial optical disc storage medium, initially licensed, sold and marketed as MCA DiscoVision in the United States in 1978.
In 1975, Philips and MCA began to work together, and in 1978, commercially much too late, they presented their long-awaited Laserdisc in Atlanta.

History of BBC television idents

Balloon identCircle' identsRhythm & Movement' idents
From 1991 until the late 1990s, the BBC also used LaserDisc technology to play out their channel idents.
The idents were computer generated and were played from modified Laserdisc players and had no soundtrack.

Bringing Out the Dead

eponymous film
The last title released in North America was Paramount's Bringing Out the Dead on October 3, 2000.
It was also the final LaserDisc released in North America, being released on October 3, 2000.

Eight-to-fourteen modulation

EFMEFMPlusEFM code
Sound could be stored in either analog or digital format and in a variety of surround sound formats; NTSC discs could carry two analog audio tracks, plus two uncompressed PCM digital audio tracks, which were (EFM, CIRC, 16-bit and 44.056 kHz sample rate).
Eight-to-fourteen modulation (EFM) is a data encoding technique – formally, a line code – used by compact discs (CD), laserdiscs (LD) and pre-Hi-MD MiniDiscs.

BBC Domesday Project

Domesday ProjectBBC Domesday SystemBBC Doomsday Project
It was chosen by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) for the BBC Domesday Project in the mid-1980s, a school-based project to commemorate 900 years since the original Domesday Book in England.
The project was stored on adapted LaserDiscs in the LaserVision Read Only Memory (LV-ROM) format, which contained not only analogue video and still pictures, but also digital data, with 300 MB of storage space on each side of the disc.

David Paul Gregg

Dr. David Paul Gregg
Optical video recording technology, using a transparent disc, was invented by David Paul Gregg and James Russell in 1963 (and patented in 1970 and 1990).
His designs and patents paved the way for the LaserDisc, which helped with the creation of the DVD, compact discs, and MiniDisc.

Pioneer PR7820

The first mass-produced industrial LaserDisc player was the MCA DiscoVision PR-7820, later rebranded the Pioneer PR7820.
The Pioneer PR-7820 was the first mass-produced industrial LaserDisc player, sold originally as the MCA DiscoVision PR-7820.

Compact disc

CDCDsCD single
The technologies and concepts behind LaserDisc were the foundation for later optical disc formats including Compact Disc (CD), DVD and Blu-ray (BD). Although appearing similar to compact discs or DVDs, LaserDiscs used analog video stored in the composite domain (having a video bandwidth approximately equivalent to the 1 in C-Type VTR format) with analog FM stereo sound and PCM digital audio.
The compact disc is an evolution of LaserDisc technology, where a focused laser beam

Tokyo Raiders

A dozen or so more titles continued to be released in Japan until September 21, 2001, with the last Japanese released movie was the Hong Kong film Tokyo Raiders from Golden Harvest.
Notably, the film was the last film to ever be released on LaserDisc, being released in September 2001.

Composite video

compositeCVBScomposite video signal
Although appearing similar to compact discs or DVDs, LaserDiscs used analog video stored in the composite domain (having a video bandwidth approximately equivalent to the 1 in C-Type VTR format) with analog FM stereo sound and PCM digital audio.
Most home analog video equipment record a signal in (roughly) composite format: LaserDiscs store a true composite signal, while consumer videotape formats (including VHS and Betamax) and commercial and industrial tape formats (including U-Matic) use modified composite signals (generally known as color-under).

CX (audio)

CXCX noise reductionCX-encoded
Later analog discs also applied CX noise reduction, which improved the signal-noise ratio of their audio.
While the implementation of CX with LPs was quite unsuccessful and short-lived, CX would later see success as the noise reduction used for the stereo analog audio tracks on the LaserDisc format.

Dragon's Lair

Dirk the DaringDragon's Lair TrilogyDragon's Lair: The Movie
American Laser Games and Cinematronics produced elaborate arcade consoles that used the random-access features to create interactive movies such as Dragon's Lair and Space Ace.
The game was ported to several other platforms, but as no home system technology of that era could accommodate the graphical quality of laserdisc, several abridged versions of the original game were released under different names.

Pioneer CLD-D703

The Pioneer CLD-D703, or the CLD-D770 in non-North American marketplaces, was a part of Pioneer's 700 Series of upper mid-range LaserDisc players, and the first player in the family and top of Pioneer's 1994 North American line.

Videodisc

video discvideodisc recordingvideodisk
By 1969, Philips had developed a videodisc in reflective mode, which has advantages over the transparent mode.
Finally, Japan's Pioneer Electronic Corporation trademarked it as LaserDisc, the name by which it is perhaps best known.

Pioneer DVL

DVD/LD combi players
The DVL-XXXX Series of LaserDisc home video players were manufactured by Pioneer Corporation and were some of the last LaserDisc players manufactured before the format's retirement.

Pioneer CLD-1010

CLD-1010
The Pioneer CLD-1010 is a LaserDisc player introduced by Pioneer Electronics in 1987 as the last of their top-spec players not to be part of their "Elite" lineup.

NTSC

analogNTSC-M30p
Sound could be stored in either analog or digital format and in a variety of surround sound formats; NTSC discs could carry two analog audio tracks, plus two uncompressed PCM digital audio tracks, which were (EFM, CIRC, 16-bit and 44.056 kHz sample rate).
These discrepancies exist not only in television broadcasts over the air and through cable, but also in the home-video market, on both tape and disc, including laser disc and DVD.

Audio commentary

audio commentariescommentary trackcommentary
LaserDisc's support for multiple audio tracks allowed for vast supplemental materials to be included on-disc and made it the first available format for "Special Edition" releases; the 1984 Criterion Collection edition of Citizen Kane is generally credited as being the first "Special Edition" release to home video (King Kong being the first release to have an audio commentary track included), and for setting the standard by which future SE discs were measured.
The value of audio commentaries as a marketing tool was revealed during the heyday of laserdisc, the laser-based video format produced before the introduction of DVDs.

Dolby Digital

Dolby Digital 5.1AC3AC-3
Early LaserDiscs featured in 1978 were entirely analog but the format evolved to incorporate digital stereo sound in CD format (sometimes with a TOSlink or coax output to feed an external DAC), and later multi-channel formats such as Dolby Digital and DTS.

Constant linear velocity

CLVzoned constant linear velocitylinear velocity
Laserdiscs, the first consumer optical discs, used constant linear velocity to double playback time (CLV / "extended play" discs can hold 1 hour per side; CAV / "standard play" discs can only hold 30 minutes).