Last mile

last-milefirst-milelast kilometrelast mile of transmissionLast mile providerlocal network access
The last mile or last kilometer is a phrase widely used in the telecommunications, cable television and internet industries to refer to the final leg of the telecommunications networks that deliver telecommunication services to retail end-users (customers).wikipedia
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Wireless local loop

WLLWireless Local Loop (WLL)Digital WLL
One example is fixed wireless access, where a wireless network is used instead of wires to connect a stationary terminal to the wireline network.
Wireless local loop (WLL), is the use of a wireless communications link as the "last mile / first mile" connection for delivering plain old telephone service (POTS) or Internet access (marketed under the term "broadband") to telecommunications customers.

WiMAX

Wireless Broadband4G WiMAXmobile WiMAX
These include WiMAX and broadband over power lines.
The forum describes WiMAX as "a standards-based technology enabling the delivery of last mile wireless broadband access as an alternative to cable and DSL".

Cable television

cablecable TVcable channel
The last mile or last kilometer is a phrase widely used in the telecommunications, cable television and internet industries to refer to the final leg of the telecommunications networks that deliver telecommunication services to retail end-users (customers). Examples are the copper wire subscriber lines connecting landline telephones to the local telephone exchange; coaxial cable service drops carrying cable television signals from utility poles to subscribers' homes, and cell towers linking local cell phones to the cellular network.
This service involves installing a special telephone interface at the customer's premises that converts the analog signals from the customer's in-home wiring into a digital signal, which is then sent on the local loop (replacing the analog last mile, or plain old telephone service (POTS)) to the company's switching center, where it is connected to the public switched telephone network (PSTN).

Fiber to the x

FTTHfiber to the homefibre to the home
Dielectric optical fiber systems support heavier flow at higher cost.
Fiber to the x (FTTX) (also spelled Fibre to the x) or fiber in the loop is a generic term for any broadband network architecture using optical fiber to provide all or part of the local loop used for last mile telecommunications.

Broadband over power lines

BPLbroadband over power line
These include WiMAX and broadband over power lines.
It is usable by all classes of BPL devices, including BPL devices used for the last mile connection (less than 1500m to the premises) to internet access services as well as BPL devices used within buildings for local area networks, smart grid, PLC applications.

Ethernet in the first mile

EPON10PASS-TS2BASE-TL
Ethernet in the first mile
From the customer's point of view it is their "first" mile, although from the access network's point of view it is known as the "last mile".

Local loop

subscriber lineloopsubscriber loop
Examples are the copper wire subscriber lines connecting landline telephones to the local telephone exchange; coaxial cable service drops carrying cable television signals from utility poles to subscribers' homes, and cell towers linking local cell phones to the cellular network.
In telephony, the local loop (also referred to as a local tail, subscriber line, or in the aggregate as the last mile) is the physical link or circuit that connects from the demarcation point of the customer premises to the edge of the common carrier or telecommunications service provider's network.

Last mile (transportation)

last milelast mile problemlast-mile mobility
Last mile (transportation)
The term "last mile" was originally used in the telecommunications field but has since been applied to supply chain management.

Fiber-optic communication

fiber-opticfiber-optic networkfiber optic communication
In recent years, the capacity of fiber-optic communication, aided by a supporting industry, has resulted in an expansion of raw capacity, so much so that in the United States a large amount of installed fiber infrastructure is not being used because it is currently excess capacity "dark fiber".
Although fiber-optic systems excel in high-bandwidth applications, optical fiber has been slow to achieve its goal of fiber to the premises or to solve the last mile problem.

Middle mile

middle-mile
Middle mile
The term middle mile arose to distinguish this part of the network from the last mile, which means the local links which provide service to the retail customer or end user, such as the local telephone lines from the telephone exchange or the coaxial cables from which connect to the customer's equipment.

Landline

fixed linefixed-lineland line
Fixed copper lines have been subject to theft due to the value of copper, but optical fibers make unattractive targets.
Last mile

Telecommunication

telecommunicationscommunicationstelecom
The last mile or last kilometer is a phrase widely used in the telecommunications, cable television and internet industries to refer to the final leg of the telecommunications networks that deliver telecommunication services to retail end-users (customers).

Internet

onlinethe Internetweb
The last mile or last kilometer is a phrase widely used in the telecommunications, cable television and internet industries to refer to the final leg of the telecommunications networks that deliver telecommunication services to retail end-users (customers).

Telecommunications network

networkcommunication networkcommunications network
The last mile or last kilometer is a phrase widely used in the telecommunications, cable television and internet industries to refer to the final leg of the telecommunications networks that deliver telecommunication services to retail end-users (customers).

Telephone

phonetelephonesLocal Telephone Service
Examples are the copper wire subscriber lines connecting landline telephones to the local telephone exchange; coaxial cable service drops carrying cable television signals from utility poles to subscribers' homes, and cell towers linking local cell phones to the cellular network.

Telephone exchange

exchangescentral officeexchange
Examples are the copper wire subscriber lines connecting landline telephones to the local telephone exchange; coaxial cable service drops carrying cable television signals from utility poles to subscribers' homes, and cell towers linking local cell phones to the cellular network.

Coaxial cable

coaxialcoax cablecable
Examples are the copper wire subscriber lines connecting landline telephones to the local telephone exchange; coaxial cable service drops carrying cable television signals from utility poles to subscribers' homes, and cell towers linking local cell phones to the cellular network.

Service drop

lower voltage service feeders from the utility to the building
Examples are the copper wire subscriber lines connecting landline telephones to the local telephone exchange; coaxial cable service drops carrying cable television signals from utility poles to subscribers' homes, and cell towers linking local cell phones to the cellular network.

Utility pole

telephone poletelegraph poletelephone poles
Examples are the copper wire subscriber lines connecting landline telephones to the local telephone exchange; coaxial cable service drops carrying cable television signals from utility poles to subscribers' homes, and cell towers linking local cell phones to the cellular network.

Cell site

cell towercell towerscell phone tower
Examples are the copper wire subscriber lines connecting landline telephones to the local telephone exchange; coaxial cable service drops carrying cable television signals from utility poles to subscribers' homes, and cell towers linking local cell phones to the cellular network.

Mobile phone

cell phonemobilemobile phones
Examples are the copper wire subscriber lines connecting landline telephones to the local telephone exchange; coaxial cable service drops carrying cable television signals from utility poles to subscribers' homes, and cell towers linking local cell phones to the cellular network.

Cellular network

cellularmobile networkcellular networks
Examples are the copper wire subscriber lines connecting landline telephones to the local telephone exchange; coaxial cable service drops carrying cable television signals from utility poles to subscribers' homes, and cell towers linking local cell phones to the cellular network.

Bandwidth (signal processing)

bandwidthbandwidthssignal bandwidth
The last mile is typically the speed bottleneck in communication networks; its bandwidth effectively limits the bandwidth of data that can be delivered to the customer.

Telecommunications link

uplinkdownlinkforward link
For example, telephone trunklines that carry phone calls between switching centers are made of modern optical fiber, but the last mile is typically twisted pair wires, a technology which has essentially remained unchanged for over a century since the original laying of copper phone cables.

Optical fiber

fiber opticfiber opticsfibre optic
For example, telephone trunklines that carry phone calls between switching centers are made of modern optical fiber, but the last mile is typically twisted pair wires, a technology which has essentially remained unchanged for over a century since the original laying of copper phone cables.