Latent heat

Latent heat fluxlatentlatent energyheatSpecific latent heatenergies of vaporisationenergylatent cooling of vaporizationlatent heat of condensationlatent heat of sublimation
Latent heat is energy released or absorbed, by a body or a thermodynamic system, during a constant-temperature process — usually a first-order phase transition.wikipedia
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Joseph Black

BlackBlack, JosephDr Black’s
The term was introduced around 1762 by British chemist Joseph Black.
Joseph Black (16 April 1728 – 6 December 1799) was a Scottish physicist and chemist, known for his discoveries of magnesium, latent heat, specific heat, and carbon dioxide.

Sensible heat

sensiblesensible heat fluxsensible energy
In contrast to latent heat, sensible heat is energy transferred as heat, with a resultant temperature change in a body.
The term is used in contrast to a latent heat, which is the amount of heat exchanged that is hidden, meaning it occurs without change of temperature.

Enthalpy of fusion

Std enthalpy change of fusionheat of fusionlatent heat of fusion
Examples are latent heat of fusion and latent heat of vaporization involved in phase changes, i.e. a substance condensing or vaporizing at a specified temperature and pressure.
The 'enthalpy' of fusion is a latent heat, because during melting the heat energy needed to change the substance from solid to liquid at atmospheric pressure is latent heat of fusion, as the temperature remains constant during the process.

Phase transition

phase transitionsorder parameterphase change
Examples are latent heat of fusion and latent heat of vaporization involved in phase changes, i.e. a substance condensing or vaporizing at a specified temperature and pressure.
First-order phase transitions are those that involve a latent heat.

Freezing

solidificationfrozenfreeze
Latent heat is associated with the change of phase of atmospheric or ocean water, vaporization, condensation, freezing or melting, whereas sensible heat is energy transferred that is evident in change of the temperature of the atmosphere or ocean, or ice, without those phase changes, though it is associated with changes of pressure and volume.
The energy released upon freezing is a latent heat, and is known as the enthalpy of fusion and is exactly the same as the energy required to melt the same amount of the solid.

Heat

heat energythermalhot
In contrast to latent heat, sensible heat is energy transferred as heat, with a resultant temperature change in a body.
In an 1847 lecture entitled On Matter, Living Force, and Heat, James Prescott Joule characterized the terms latent heat and sensible heat as components of heat each affecting distinct physical phenomena, namely the potential and kinetic energy of particles, respectively.

Melting

moltenmeltmelted
Latent heat is associated with the change of phase of atmospheric or ocean water, vaporization, condensation, freezing or melting, whereas sensible heat is energy transferred that is evident in change of the temperature of the atmosphere or ocean, or ice, without those phase changes, though it is associated with changes of pressure and volume.
From a thermodynamics point of view, at the melting point the change in Gibbs free energy ∆G of the substances is zero, but there are non-zero changes in the enthalpy (H) and the entropy (S), known respectively as the enthalpy of fusion (or latent heat of fusion) and the entropy of fusion.

Transpiration

transpiretranspiredtranspiring
In meteorology, latent heat flux is the flux of heat from the Earth's surface to the atmosphere that is associated with evaporation or transpiration of water at the surface and subsequent condensation of water vapor in the troposphere.
Transpiration serves to evaporatively cool plants, as the evaporating water carries away heat energy due to its large latent heat of vaporization of 2260 kJ per litre.

Bowen ratio

evaporative fraction
Latent heat flux has been commonly measured with the Bowen ratio technique, or more recently since the mid-1900s by the Jonathan Beaver method.
Heat transfer can either occur as sensible heat (differences in temperature without evapotranspiration) or latent heat (the energy required during a change of state, without a change in temperature).

Troposphere

troposphericdivergencemid-tropospheric
In meteorology, latent heat flux is the flux of heat from the Earth's surface to the atmosphere that is associated with evaporation or transpiration of water at the surface and subsequent condensation of water vapor in the troposphere.
The troposphere is heated from below by latent heat, longwave radiation, and sensible heat.

Flux

flux densityion fluxflow
In meteorology, latent heat flux is the flux of heat from the Earth's surface to the atmosphere that is associated with evaporation or transpiration of water at the surface and subsequent condensation of water vapor in the troposphere.

Latency

latentLatency (disambiguation)
The English word latent comes from Latin latēns, meaning lying hidden.

Thermal energy

thermalheatenergy
James Prescott Joule characterised latent energy as the energy of interaction in a given configuration of particles, i.e. a form of potential energy, and the sensible heat as an energy that was indicated by the thermometer, relating the latter to thermal energy.
He identified the terms latent heat and sensible heat as forms of heat each affecting distinct physical phenomena, namely the potential and kinetic energy of particles, respectively.

Evaporation

evaporateevaporatedevaporates
In meteorology, latent heat flux is the flux of heat from the Earth's surface to the atmosphere that is associated with evaporation or transpiration of water at the surface and subsequent condensation of water vapor in the troposphere.

Water vapor

water vapourvaporevaporation
In meteorology, latent heat flux is the flux of heat from the Earth's surface to the atmosphere that is associated with evaporation or transpiration of water at the surface and subsequent condensation of water vapor in the troposphere.

Eddy covariance

boundary layer eddiesflux towergas flux measurements
Latent heat flux has been commonly measured with the Bowen ratio technique, or more recently since the mid-1900s by the Jonathan Beaver method.

James Prescott Joule

James JouleJouleJ. P. Joule
James Prescott Joule characterised latent energy as the energy of interaction in a given configuration of particles, i.e. a form of potential energy, and the sensible heat as an energy that was indicated by the thermometer, relating the latter to thermal energy.

Thermodynamic system

systemopen systemboundary
Latent heat is energy released or absorbed, by a body or a thermodynamic system, during a constant-temperature process — usually a first-order phase transition.

Great Britain

BritishBritainGBR
The term was introduced around 1762 by British chemist Joseph Black.

Chemist

chemistsresearch chemistchemical
The term was introduced around 1762 by British chemist Joseph Black.

Calorimetry

calorimetriccalorimeterconstant pressure calorimetry
Black used the term in the context of calorimetry where a heat transfer caused a volume change in a body while its temperature was constant.

Vaporization

vaporizevaporizesvaporisation
Latent heat is associated with the change of phase of atmospheric or ocean water, vaporization, condensation, freezing or melting, whereas sensible heat is energy transferred that is evident in change of the temperature of the atmosphere or ocean, or ice, without those phase changes, though it is associated with changes of pressure and volume.

Condensation

condensecondensedcondenses
Latent heat is associated with the change of phase of atmospheric or ocean water, vaporization, condensation, freezing or melting, whereas sensible heat is energy transferred that is evident in change of the temperature of the atmosphere or ocean, or ice, without those phase changes, though it is associated with changes of pressure and volume. In meteorology, latent heat flux is the flux of heat from the Earth's surface to the atmosphere that is associated with evaporation or transpiration of water at the surface and subsequent condensation of water vapor in the troposphere.

Enthalpy of vaporization

Std enthalpy change of vaporizationheat of vaporizationlatent heat of vaporization
Examples are latent heat of fusion and latent heat of vaporization involved in phase changes, i.e. a substance condensing or vaporizing at a specified temperature and pressure.