Latter Day Saint movement

Latter Day SaintLatter-Day SaintsLatter-day Saint movementLatter-Day SaintLatter Day SaintsLDSLatter Day Saints movementChurch of ChristMormonMormons
The Latter Day Saint movement (also called the LDS movement, LDS restorationist movement, or Smith–Rigdon movement) is the collection of independent church groups that trace their origins to a Christian Restorationist movement founded by Joseph Smith in the late 1820s.wikipedia
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Joseph Smith

Joseph Smith, Jr.Joseph Smith Jr.Joseph
The Latter Day Saint movement (also called the LDS movement, LDS restorationist movement, or Smith–Rigdon movement) is the collection of independent church groups that trace their origins to a Christian Restorationist movement founded by Joseph Smith in the late 1820s. The founder of the Latter Day Saint movement was Joseph Smith, and to a lesser extent, during the movement's first two years, Oliver Cowdery.
Joseph Smith Jr. (December 23, 1805 – June 27, 1844) was an American religious leader and founder of Mormonism and the Latter Day Saint movement.

Mormonism

MormonMormonsMormon religion
The predominant theology of the churches in the movement is Mormonism, which sees itself as restoring the early Christian church with additional revelations.
Mormonism is the predominant religious tradition of the Latter Day Saint movement of Restorationist Christianity started by Joseph Smith in Western New York in the 1820s and 30s.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

LDS ChurchLatter-day SaintChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Collectively, these churches have over 16 million members, although the vast majority of these—about 98%—belong to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).
It is the largest denomination in the Latter Day Saint movement founded by Joseph Smith during the early 19th century period of religious revival known as the Second Great Awakening.

Remnant Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

Other groups include the Remnant Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, which supports lineal succession of leadership from Smith's descendants, and the more controversial Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, which defends the practice of polygamy.
The Remnant Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, usually referred to as the Remnant Church, is a denomination in the Latter Day Saint movement.

Book of Mormon

The Book of MormonAaronBook of Mormon: Another Testament of Jesus Christ
The movement began in western New York during the Second Great Awakening when Smith said that he received visions revealing a new sacred text, the Book of Mormon, which he published in 1830 as a complement to the Bible.
The Book of Mormon is a sacred text of the Latter Day Saint movement, which adherents believe contains writings of ancient prophets who lived on the American continent from approximately 2200 BC to AD 421.

Kirtland, Ohio

KirtlandKirtland 0.9 SWKirtland cult killings
In 1831, Smith, moved the church headquarters to Kirtland, Ohio, and in 1838 changed its name to the "Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints".
Kirtland is known for being the early headquarters of the Latter Day Saint movement from 1831–1837 and is the site of the first Mormon temple, the Kirtland Temple, completed in 1836.

Death of Joseph Smith

Smith's deathkilleddeath
After Smith's death in 1844, a succession crisis led to the organization splitting into several groups.
Joseph Smith, the founder and leader of the Latter Day Saint movement, and his brother, Hyrum Smith, were killed by a mob in Carthage, Illinois, on June 27, 1844.

Restorationism

RestorationistrestorationRestorationism (Christian primitivism)
The Latter Day Saint movement (also called the LDS movement, LDS restorationist movement, or Smith–Rigdon movement) is the collection of independent church groups that trace their origins to a Christian Restorationist movement founded by Joseph Smith in the late 1820s. Based on the teachings of this book and other revelations, Smith founded a Christian primitivist church, called the "Church of Christ".
Examples include the Latter Day Saint movement of Joseph Smith and Pentecostalism.

Church of Christ (Latter Day Saints)

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day SaintsChurch of ChristChurch of the Latter Day Saints
Based on the teachings of this book and other revelations, Smith founded a Christian primitivist church, called the "Church of Christ".
Organized informally in 1829 in New York and then formally on April 6, 1830, it was the first organization to implement the principles found in Smith's newly published Book of Mormon, and thus represents the formal beginning of the Latter Day Saint movement.

Second Great Awakening

Great AwakeningGreat RevivalThe Second Great Awakening
The movement began in western New York during the Second Great Awakening when Smith said that he received visions revealing a new sacred text, the Book of Mormon, which he published in 1830 as a complement to the Bible.
New religious movements emerged during the Second Great Awakening, such as Adventism, Dispensationalism, and the Latter Day Saint movement.

Haun's Mill massacre

Haun's MillHaun's Mill, Missouriattacked
After the church in Ohio collapsed due to a financial crisis and dissensions, in 1838, Smith and the body of the church moved to Missouri where they were persecuted (see Hauns Mill Massacre) and finally forced to Illinois.
By far the bloodiest event in the 1838 Mormon War in Missouri, it has long been remembered by the members of the Latter Day Saint movement.

Mormon fundamentalism

Mormon fundamentalistfundamentalist MormonMormon fundamentalists
This change resulted in the formation of a number of small sects who sought to maintain polygamy and other 19th-century doctrines and practices, now referred to as "Mormon fundamentalism".
The principle most often associated with Mormon fundamentalism is plural marriage, a form of polygyny first taught in the Latter Day Saint movement by the movement's founder, Smith.

Joseph Smith III

Joseph IIIJoseph Smith, III
The largest of these, Community of Christ (originally known as the "Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints"), was formed in Illinois in 1860 by several groups uniting around Smith's son, Joseph Smith III.
Joseph Smith III (November 6, 1832 – December 10, 1914) was the eldest surviving son of Joseph Smith Jr., founder of the Latter Day Saint movement, and Emma Hale Smith.

Burned-over district

Burnt-Over Districtwestern New YorkBurned Over District
The movement began in western New York during the Second Great Awakening when Smith said that he received visions revealing a new sacred text, the Book of Mormon, which he published in 1830 as a complement to the Bible.

Oliver Cowdery

Oliver H. P. Cowdery
The founder of the Latter Day Saint movement was Joseph Smith, and to a lesser extent, during the movement's first two years, Oliver Cowdery.
Oliver H. P. Cowdery (October 3, 1806 – March 3, 1850) was, with Joseph Smith, an important participant in the formative period of the Latter Day Saint movement between 1829 and 1836.

First Vision

seen God the Father and Jesus Christappeared to himFirst Vision of Joseph Smith
Throughout his life, Smith told of an experience he had as a boy having seen God the Father and Jesus Christ as two separate beings, who told him that the true church of Jesus Christ had been lost and would be restored through him, and that he would be given the authority to organize and lead the true Church of Christ.
Smith's followers believe the vision reinforces his authority as the founder and prophet of the Latter Day Saint movement.

Illinois

ILState of IllinoisIll.
Other groups originating within the Latter Day Saint movement followed different paths in Missouri, Illinois, Michigan, and Pennsylvania.
But in 1844, the Latter Day Saint movement founder Joseph Smith was killed in the Carthage Jail, about 30 miles away from Nauvoo.

Priesthood (Latter Day Saints)

priesthoodpriesthood authorityLDS priesthood
Smith and Cowdery also explained that the angels John the Baptist, Peter, James, and John visited them in 1829 and gave them priesthood authority to reestablish the Church of Christ.
In the Latter Day Saint movement, priesthood is the power and authority of God given to man, including the authority to perform ordinances and to act as a leader in the church.

William Law (Latter Day Saints)

William LawWilliam Law (Mormonism)
In 1844, William Law and several other Latter Day Saints in church leadership positions publicly denounced Smith's secret practice of polygamy in the Nauvoo Expositor, and formed their own church.
William Law (September 8, 1809 – January 19, 1892) was an important figure in the early history of the Latter Day Saint movement, holding a position in the early church's First Presidency under Joseph Smith.

True Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

their own churchbreak-away churchcompeting church
In 1844, William Law and several other Latter Day Saints in church leadership positions publicly denounced Smith's secret practice of polygamy in the Nauvoo Expositor, and formed their own church.
The True Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints or True Mormon Church was a denomination of the Latter Day Saint movement.

Succession crisis (Latter Day Saints)

succession crisis1844 succession crisisleadership crisis
After Smith's death in 1844, a succession crisis led to the organization splitting into several groups.
The succession crisis in the Latter Day Saint movement occurred after the death of Joseph Smith, the movement's founder, on June 27, 1844.

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
The Latter Day Saint movement (also called the LDS movement, LDS restorationist movement, or Smith–Rigdon movement) is the collection of independent church groups that trace their origins to a Christian Restorationist movement founded by Joseph Smith in the late 1820s.
Other groups originating in this time period include the Christadelphians and the previously mentioned Latter Day Saints movement.

Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day SaintsFLDSFLDS Church
Other groups include the Remnant Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, which supports lineal succession of leadership from Smith's descendants, and the more controversial Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, which defends the practice of polygamy.
The FLDS Church is the seventh Latter Day Saint denomination to have built a temple.

Quorum of the Twelve

Quorum of the Twelve ApostlesQuorum of Twelve ApostlesTwelve Apostles
Many supported Brigham Young, the President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles; others Sidney Rigdon, the senior surviving member of the First Presidency.
In the Latter Day Saint movement, the Quorum of the Twelve (also known as the Council of the Twelve, the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, Council of the Twelve Apostles, or the Twelve) is one of the governing bodies or (quorums) of the church hierarchy organized by the movement's founder Joseph Smith, and patterned after the Apostles of Jesus (see Commissioning of the Twelve Apostles).

Sidney Rigdon

Elder RigdonNancy RigdonRigdon, Sidney
Many supported Brigham Young, the President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles; others Sidney Rigdon, the senior surviving member of the First Presidency.
Sidney Rigdon (February 19, 1793 – July 14, 1876) was a leader during the early history of the Latter Day Saint movement.