Laugh track

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A laugh track (or laughter track) is a separate soundtrack for a recorded comedy show containing the sound of audience laughter.wikipedia
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Charles Douglass

Charles "Charley" DouglassCharley Douglass
This was invented by American sound engineer Charles "Charley" Douglass.
Charles Rolland "Charley" Douglass (January 2, 1910 – April 8, 2003) was an American sound engineer, credited as the inventor of the laugh track.

Sitcom

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The Douglass laugh track became a standard in mainstream television in the U.S., dominating most prime-time sitcoms from the late 1950s to the late 1970s. The first American television show to incorporate a laugh track was the sitcom The Hank McCune Show in 1950.
The effect of a live studio audience can be imitated or enhanced by the use of a laugh track.

The Hank McCune Show

The first American television show to incorporate a laugh track was the sitcom The Hank McCune Show in 1950.
Filmed without a studio audience, the series is notable for being the first television program to incorporate a laugh track.

The Stu Erwin Show

Life with the ErwinsThe Trouble with Father
Other single-camera filmed shows, like The Pride of the Family (ABC, 1953–54), soon followed suit, though several, like The Trouble with Father (ABC, 1950–55), The Beulah Show (ABC, 1950–52) and The Goldbergs (several networks, 1949–56), did not feature an audience or a laugh-track.
Predating modern single-camera sitcoms, The Stu Erwin Show originally aired without a laugh track (one was added in its final season), and each episode was around 26 minutes long, without commercials.

Sweetening (show business)

sweeteningaudio-sweetening
This editing technique became known as sweetening, in which recorded laughter is used to augment the response of the real studio audience if they did not react as strongly as desired.
In television, sweetening refers to the use of a laugh track in addition to a live studio audience.

Lidsville

After Pufnstuf, the Kroffts employed Douglass's services on all shows produced for Saturday morning television (except for Land of the Lost, which was more dramatic in nature), including The Bugaloos, Lidsville, Sigmund and the Sea Monsters, The Lost Saucer and Far Out Space Nuts.
Like most children's television shows of the era, Lidsville contained a laugh track.

The Ant and the Aardvark

From Bed to Worse'' (The Ant and the Aardvark)
The show consisted of previous theatrical entries compiled into a series of half-hour showcases, which included other DFE theatrical shorts including The Inspector, Roland and Ratfink, The Ant and the Aardvark and The Tijuana Toads (redubbed as The Texas Toads for television due to perceived Mexican racial stereotypes).
Most of the 17 entries appear in their television syndication form (complete with an audible laugh track added by NBC-TV) on the video on demand service Amazon Video.

The Jetsons

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Hanna-Barbera followed suit and utilized a full laugh track for its prime-time shows up to 1970, including The Flintstones (ABC, 1960–66), Top Cat (ABC, 1961–62), and The Jetsons (ABC, 1962–63).
The show's original run consisted of 24 episodes that first aired on ABC from September 23, 1962, to March 17, 1963, and, as was standard practice at the time, contained a laugh track.

Bing Crosby

Bing Crosby ProductionsCrosbyBing
Bing Crosby eventually adopted the technology to pre-record his radio show, which was scheduled for a certain time every week, to avoid having to perform the show live, as well as having to perform it a second time for West Coast audiences.
His organization, the Crosby Research Foundation, held tape recording patents and developed equipment and recording techniques such as the laugh track that are still in use today.

The World of Sid & Marty Krofft at the Hollywood Bowl

"Kiddie laughs", as they are known, first saw use for sweetening for the 1973 syndicated television special, The World of Sid and Marty Krofft at the Hollywood Bowl, but were soon heard on most Saturday morning kids' shows by 1974, such as Uncle Croc's Block, Sigmund and the Sea Monsters, The Pink Panther Show, The Lost Saucer and Far Out Space Nuts.
Although shot at the Hollywood Bowl in front of a live audience, the special also utilized a laugh track, like other Krofft shows, for sweetening.

Gilligan's Planet

Rankin-Bass, DePatie–Freleng Enterprises (DFE) and Hanna-Barbera adopted the practice through 1983; Filmation's Gilligan's Planet (CBS, 1982–83) was the final series to include a laugh track.
In addition, it was one of the last 1980s Saturday morning cartoons to be fitted with an adult laugh track, as the popularity of the practice had subsided.

The Archie Show

ArchieArchie ShowArchie's Fun House
From 1968 to 1983, most comedic cartoons produced for the Saturday morning genre were fitted with a laugh track, beginning with Filmation's The Archie Show in 1968.
The Archie Show utilized a laugh track, the first such example of the colloquially-titled Saturday morning cartoons.

The Super Globetrotters

The Super Globetrotters (NBC, 1979–80)
Like many animated series created by Hanna-Barbera in the 1970s, the show contained a laugh track created by the studio.

I Love Lucy

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This process was originally employed for their sitcom I Love Lucy, which used a live studio audience and no laugh track.
Audience reactions were live, thus creating a far more authentic laugh than the canned laughter used on most filmed sitcoms of the time.

The Bugaloos

John McIndoe
After Pufnstuf, the Kroffts employed Douglass's services on all shows produced for Saturday morning television (except for Land of the Lost, which was more dramatic in nature), including The Bugaloos, Lidsville, Sigmund and the Sea Monsters, The Lost Saucer and Far Out Space Nuts.
Like most children's television shows of the era, The Bugaloos contained a laugh track.

The Pink Panther Show

Pink PantherThe Pink PantherThe Pink Panther and Friends
The Pink Panther Show (NBC, 1969-1978; ABC, 1978-1980) was an anomaly among its peers.
By the time of the show's 1969 debut, fitting cartoon and children shows with a laugh track was standard practice.

Yogi's Gang

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Yogi's Gang (ABC, 1973)
Like many animated series created by Hanna-Barbera in the 1970s, the show contained a an inferior laugh track created by the studio — one of the few series starring Yogi Bear to do so.

M*A*S*H (TV series)

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Certain shows, like Get Smart, featured a laugh track that became more invasive as the series progressed, while shows like M*A*S*H toned down the laughter as the series became more dramatic (it was entirely absent during operating room scenes).
A different innovation was the show's producers' desire not to have a laugh track, contrary to the network's desire to have one.

Harlem Globetrotters (TV series)

Harlem GlobetrottersThe Harlem GlobetrottersHarlem Globe Trotters
Following its success, Hanna-Barbera expanded the laugh track to virtually all of its shows for the 1970–71 season, including Harlem Globetrotters (CBS, 1970–71) and Josie and the Pussycats (CBS, 1970–71).
Like many other Saturday morning cartoons of the era, the first-season episodes utilized a laugh track.

Pryor's Place

Several shows included Donny and Marie, The Brady Bunch Variety Hour, The Krofft Supershow, The Krofft Superstar Hour, Pink Lady and Jeff, Barbara Mandrell and the Mandrell Sisters, Pryor's Place, as well as their 1987 syndicated sitcom D.C. Follies.
The show was also fitted with a laugh track.

The Flintstones

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Hanna-Barbera followed suit and utilized a full laugh track for its prime-time shows up to 1970, including The Flintstones (ABC, 1960–66), Top Cat (ABC, 1961–62), and The Jetsons (ABC, 1962–63).
Despite the animation and fantasy setting, the series was initially aimed at adult audiences, which was reflected in the comedy writing, which, as noted, resembled the average primetime sitcoms of the era, with the usual family issues resolved with a laugh at the end of each episode, as well as the inclusion of a laugh track.

Jack Mullin

John T. MullinJohn T. "Jack" Mullin
In 1946, Jack Mullin brought a Magnetophon magnetic tape recorder back from Radio Frankfurt, along with 50 reels of tape; the recorder was one of the magnetic tape recorders that BASF and AEG had built in Germany starting in 1935.
Mullin has claimed that he even pioneered the use of the laugh track; at the insistence of Crosby's writer Bill Morrow, he inserted a segment of raucous laughter from an earlier show to follow a joke in a later show that had not worked well.

Hong Kong Phooey

Hong Kong Phooey (ABC, 1974)
These characters later appear in their own continuing segment, "Posse Impossible" on CB Bears. Like many animated series created by Hanna-Barbera in the 1970s, the show uses the limited Hanna-Barbera laugh track.

The Banana Splits

The Banana Splits Adventure HourBanana SplitsThe Banana Splits and Friends Show
Midday programming, like The Banana Splits Adventure Hour (NBC, 1968–70), gradually followed suit.
This Hanna-Barbera series was also one of the first Saturday morning cartoon shows to utilize a laugh track.

Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels

Captain CavemanCapitaine Caverne
Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels (ABC, 1977–80)
Like many animated series created by Hanna-Barbera in the 1970s, the show contained a laugh track, one of their last productions to do so.