Law of the United Kingdom

British lawUK lawUnited Kingdom lawUnited KingdomBritishBritish legal systemlawlegislationUK legislationBritish legislation
Sub-nationally, the United Kingdom has three legal systems, each of which derives from a particular geographical area and for a variety of historical reasons: English law, Scots law, and Northern Ireland law.wikipedia
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Scots law

Scottish lawScotlandlaw
Sub-nationally, the United Kingdom has three legal systems, each of which derives from a particular geographical area and for a variety of historical reasons: English law, Scots law, and Northern Ireland law.
Together with English law and Northern Irish law, it is one of the three legal systems of the United Kingdom.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
The Supreme Court is the highest court in the land for both criminal and civil appeal cases in England and Wales and any decision it makes is binding on every other court in the same jurisdiction, and often has persuasive effect in its other jurisdictions.
There is no legislation mandating an official language for England, but English is the only language used for official business.

Welsh law

Contemporary Welsh LawlawsCyfraith Hywel
Since 2007, as a result of the passage of the Government of Wales Act 2006 by Parliament, there also exists purely Welsh law.
As there is no criminal law within contemporary Welsh law, Wales is not generally considered a fourth jurisdiction of the United Kingdom.

List of national legal systems

legal systemjustice systemlegal systems
Sub-nationally, the United Kingdom has three legal systems, each of which derives from a particular geographical area and for a variety of historical reasons: English law, Scots law, and Northern Ireland law.
Common law is currently in practice in Ireland, most of the United Kingdom (England and Wales and Northern Ireland), Australia, New Zealand, Bangladesh, India (excluding Goa), Pakistan, South Africa, Canada (excluding Quebec), Hong Kong, the United States (on a state level excluding Louisiana), and many other places.

Civil law (legal system)

civil lawcivilcivil law system
English law can be described as having its own legal doctrine, distinct from civil law legal systems since 1189.

English law

English common lawEnglishEngland and Wales
Sub-nationally, the United Kingdom has three legal systems, each of which derives from a particular geographical area and for a variety of historical reasons: English law, Scots law, and Northern Ireland law. However, unlike the other three laws, this is not a separate legal system per se, being merely the primary and secondary legislation generated by the National Assembly for Wales, interpreted in accordance with the doctrines of English law, and not impacting upon English common law (except where such Welsh legislation ousts a common law rule by virtue of being a superior form of law).
Common law is made by sitting judges who apply both statutory law and established principles which are derived from the reasoning from earlier decisions.

Courts of Northern Ireland

High Court of Northern IrelandHigh CourtJudicature (Northern Ireland) Act 1978
The Courts of Northern Ireland follow the same pattern.

British nationality law

BritishBritish citizenBritish citizenship
Residents are treated the same as residents of the UK for the purposes of British nationality law, though local governments control local immigration and employment.
British nationality law is the law of the United Kingdom that concerns citizenship and other categories of British nationality.

Isle of Man

ManxMannIsle of Mann
The Isle of Man is held by the British Monarch by virtue of inheriting the feudal title of Lord of Mann.
Under British law, the Isle of Man is not part of the United Kingdom.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
Sub-nationally, the United Kingdom has three legal systems, each of which derives from a particular geographical area and for a variety of historical reasons: English law, Scots law, and Northern Ireland law.

Northern Ireland law

Northern IrelandNorthern Irish lawLaw of Northern Ireland
Sub-nationally, the United Kingdom has three legal systems, each of which derives from a particular geographical area and for a variety of historical reasons: English law, Scots law, and Northern Ireland law.

Government of Wales Act 2006

2006 Government of Wales Actdevolved responsibilitiesSchedule 5
Since 2007, as a result of the passage of the Government of Wales Act 2006 by Parliament, there also exists purely Welsh law.

National Assembly for Wales

Welsh AssemblyNational Assembly of WalesNational Assembly
However, unlike the other three laws, this is not a separate legal system per se, being merely the primary and secondary legislation generated by the National Assembly for Wales, interpreted in accordance with the doctrines of English law, and not impacting upon English common law (except where such Welsh legislation ousts a common law rule by virtue of being a superior form of law).

England and Wales

England & WalesEnglishEngland
There is a substantial overlap between these three legal systems, and the three legal jurisdictions of the United Kingdom, these being England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

Scotland

Scottish🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿Scots
There is a substantial overlap between these three legal systems, and the three legal jurisdictions of the United Kingdom, these being England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

Northern Ireland

Northern IrishIrishNIR
There is a substantial overlap between these three legal systems, and the three legal jurisdictions of the United Kingdom, these being England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

Jurisprudence

Legal Studieslawjuridical
Each legal system defaults to each jurisdiction, and court systems of each jurisdiction further the relevant system of law through jurisprudence.

Private law

civil lawcivilprivate
In private law it's possible for people in certain jurisdictions to use the law of other jurisdictions, for example a company in Edinburgh, Scotland and a company in Belfast, Northern Ireland are free to contract in English law.

Edinburgh

Edinburgh, ScotlandCity of EdinburghEdinburgh, United Kingdom
In private law it's possible for people in certain jurisdictions to use the law of other jurisdictions, for example a company in Edinburgh, Scotland and a company in Belfast, Northern Ireland are free to contract in English law.

Belfast

Belfast, Northern IrelandCity of BelfastBelfast, Ireland
In private law it's possible for people in certain jurisdictions to use the law of other jurisdictions, for example a company in Edinburgh, Scotland and a company in Belfast, Northern Ireland are free to contract in English law.

Public law

publicUnited States public lawP.L.
This is inapplicable in public law (for example, criminal law), where there are set rules of procedure in each jurisdiction.

Constitution of the United Kingdom

British constitutionconstitutionEnglish constitution
British law arises where laws apply to the United Kingdom and/or its citizens as a whole, most obviously constitutional law, but also other areas, for instance tax law.

Treaty of Union

UnionTreaty of Union 1707Union with England in 1707
Article 19 of the Treaty of Union, put into effect by the Acts of Union in 1707, created the Kingdom of Great Britain, but guaranteed the continued existence of Scotland's and England's separate legal systems.

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
Article 19 of the Treaty of Union, put into effect by the Acts of Union in 1707, created the Kingdom of Great Britain, but guaranteed the continued existence of Scotland's and England's separate legal systems.

Acts of Union 1800

Act of UnionAct of Union 1800Union
The Acts of Union of 1800, which combined Great Britain and Ireland into the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, contained no equivalent provisions but preserved the principle of different courts to be held in Ireland, of which the part called Northern Ireland remains part of the United Kingdom.