Le Bone Florence of Rome

Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion

Medieval English chivalric romance.

- Le Bone Florence of Rome

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Chivalric romance

Type of prose and verse narrative that was popular in the noble courts of High Medieval and Early Modern Europe.

Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion
Holger Danske, or Ogier the Dane, from the Matter of France
A knight rescues a lady from a dragon.

In reality, a number of "non-cyclical" romances were written without any such connection; these include such romances as King Horn, Robert the Devil, Ipomadon, Emaré, Havelok the Dane,Roswall and Lillian, Le Bone Florence of Rome, and Amadas.

Gesta Romanorum

Latin collection of anecdotes and tales that was probably compiled about the end of the 13th century or the beginning of the 14th.

a version of the Crescentia cycle, similar to (though more piously phrased than) Le Bone Florence of Rome;

The Man of Law's Tale

Fifth of the Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer, written around 1387.

The Sergeant of Law
ChaucerMS42131f16r
GowerexMS42131f46v

More distantly related forms of the persecuted heroine include Le Bone Florence of Rome, and Griselda.

The King of Tars

Medieval English chivalric romance, an amplified version of the oldest variant found in the Reimchronik, which is found in three manuscripts including the Auchinleck manuscript.

Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion

This romance appears to have influenced Le Bone Florence of Rome, where the heroine's kingdom is also attacked by a rebuffed suitor.

The Book of the City of Ladies

Perhaps Christine de Pizan's most famous literary work, and it is her second work of lengthy prose.

Illustration from The Book of the City of Ladies

Florence of Rome

Emaré

Middle English Breton lai, a form of mediaeval romance poem, told in 1035 lines.

Take the Fair Face of Woman, and Gently Suspending, With Butterflies, Flowers, and Jewels Attending, Thus Your Fairy is Made of Most Beautiful Things, painting Sophie Gengembre Anderson

Sir Degaré also features it, and it also shares motifs with such romances as Lay le Freine, Octavian, Torrent of Portyngale, Sir Eglamour of Artois, Le Bone Florence of Rome, Generides, and the Chevalere Assigne.

The Wife's Lament

Old English poem of 53 lines found on folio 115 of the Exeter Book and generally treated as an elegy in the manner of the German frauenlied, or "women's song".

The Peterborough Chronicle, in a hand of about 1150, is one of the major sources of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle; the initial page

For instance, the Crescentia cycle, a series of chivalric romances such as Le Bone Florence of Rome featuring a woman persecuted by her brother-in-law and would-be seducer, has been said to traced to it; however, the woman herself complains only of malevolent relatives, not the specific brother-in-law that is the distinctive trait of the Crescentia cycle.

Ancient Engleish Metrical Romanceës

Collection of Middle English verse romances edited by the antiquary Joseph Ritson; it was the first such collection to be published.

Le Bone Florence of Rome

Sir Isumbras

Medieval metrical romance written in Middle English and found in no fewer than nine manuscripts dating to the fifteenth century.

The painting Sir Isumbras at the Ford by the nineteenth century Victorian painter John Everett Millais. painted in 1857.

A few years later, in his 1969 book The Middle English Romances of the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries, Dieter Mehl included Sir Isumbras in a sub-category of tales he labeled “homiletic romances.” According to Mehl, in these stories “the plot is completely subordinated to the moral and religious theme…One could describe these works, therefore, as either secularized Saints’ legends or legendary romances because they occupy a position exactly in the middle between these two genres.” Other romances Mehl places in this category include The King of Tars, Robert of Sicily, Sir Gowther, Emaré, Le Bone Florence of Rome, Athelston, The Sege of Melayne, and Cheuelere Assigne.