Le Corbusier

CorbusianCorbusiertower in a park Le CorbusierCharles Edouard Jeanneret (Le Corbusier)Charles Edouard Jeanneret LeCorbusierCharles Édouard JenneretCharles-Edouard JeanneretCharles-Édouard JeanneretCharles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris
Charles-Édouard Jeanneret (6 October 1887 – 27 August 1965), known as Le Corbusier, was a Swiss-French architect, designer, painter, urban planner, writer, and one of the pioneers of what is now called modern architecture.wikipedia
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Congrès Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne

CIAMCIAM (Congres Internationeaux d'Architecture Moderne)CIAM 10
Dedicated to providing better living conditions for the residents of crowded cities, Le Corbusier was influential in urban planning, and was a founding member of the Congrès International d'Architecture Moderne (CIAM).
The International Congresses of Modern Architecture (CIAM) was founded in June 1928, at the Chateau de la Sarraz in Switzerland, by a group of 28 European architects organized by Le Corbusier, Hélène de Mandrot (owner of the castle), and Sigfried Giedion (the first secretary-general).

Chandigarh

Chandigarh, IndiaCHChandigarh Administration
Le Corbusier prepared the master plan for the city of Chandigarh in India, and contributed specific designs for several buildings there.
The master plan of the city was prepared by Swiss-French architect Le Corbusier, which transformed from earlier plans created by the Polish architect Maciej Nowicki and the American planner Albert Mayer.

La Chaux-de-Fonds

La Chaux de FondsLa Chaux-de-Fonds NELa-Chaux-de-Fonds
Charles-Édouard Jeanneret was born on 6 October 1887 in La Chaux-de-Fonds, a small city in the French-speaking Neuchâtel canton in north-western Switzerland, in the Jura mountains, just 5 km across the border from France.
The famous architect Le Corbusier, the writer Blaise Cendrars and the car maker Louis Chevrolet were born there.

The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier

The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier, an Outstanding Contribution to the Modern Movement17 works by Le CorbusierThe Architectural Work of Le Corbusier: an Outstanding Contribution to the Modern Movement
On 17 July 2016, seventeen projects by Le Corbusier in seven countries were inscribed in the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites as The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier, an Outstanding Contribution to the Modern Movement.
The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier, an Outstanding Contribution to the Modern Movement is a World Heritage Site consisting of a selection of 17 building projects by the Franco-Swiss architect Le Corbusier.

Modern architecture

modernistModernModernism
Charles-Édouard Jeanneret (6 October 1887 – 27 August 1965), known as Le Corbusier, was a Swiss-French architect, designer, painter, urban planner, writer, and one of the pioneers of what is now called modern architecture.
Like Le Corbusier and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, he had no formal architectural training.

Walter Gropius

Gropius
Two years later, between October 1910 and March 1911, he traveled to Germany and worked four months in the office Peter Behrens, where Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Walter Gropius were also working and learning.
Walter Adolph Georg Gropius (18 May 1883 – 5 July 1969) was a German architect and founder of the Bauhaus School, who, along with Alvar Aalto, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright, is widely regarded as one of the pioneering masters of modernist architecture.

Art Deco

art-decoModerneArt Deco style
He traveled to Paris, and during fourteen months between 1908 until 1910 he worked as a draftsman in the office of the architect Auguste Perret, the pioneer of the use of reinforced concrete in residential construction and the architect of the Art Deco landmark Théâtre des Champs-Élysées. An important early work of Le Corbusier was the Esprit Nouveau Pavilion, built for the 1925 Paris International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts, the event which later gave Art Deco its name.
During the 1925 Exposition the architect Le Corbusier wrote a series of articles about the exhibition for his magazine L'Esprit Nouveau under the title, "1925 EXPO. ARTS. DÉCO."

Peter Behrens

BehrendsBehrensPeter
Two years later, between October 1910 and March 1911, he traveled to Germany and worked four months in the office Peter Behrens, where Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Walter Gropius were also working and learning.
He was important to the modernist movement, and several of the movement's leading names (including Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Le Corbusier and Walter Gropius) worked for him in earlier stages of their careers.

Toward an Architecture

Vers une architectureNew Architecture
In 1911, he traveled again for five months; this time he journeyed to the Balkans and visited Serbia, Bulgaria, Turkey, Greece, as well as Pompeii and Rome, filling nearly 80 sketchbooks with renderings of what he saw—including many sketches of the Parthenon, whose forms he would later praise in his work Vers une architecture (1923).
Vers une architecture, recently translated into English as Toward an Architecture but commonly known as Towards a New Architecture after the 1927 translation by Frederick Etchells, is a collection of essays written by Le Corbusier (Charles-Edouard Jeanneret), advocating for and exploring the concept of modern architecture.

Amédée Ozenfant

OzenfantAmedeé OzenfantAmedée Ozenfant
In 1918, Le Corbusier met the Cubist painter Amédée Ozenfant, in whom he recognised a kindred spirit.
Together with Charles-Edouard Jeanneret (later known as Le Corbusier) he founded the Purist movement.

Charles l'Eplattenier

Charles L’Eplattenier
Three years later he attended the higher course of decoration, founded by the painter Charles L'Eplattenier, who had studied in Budapest and Paris.
A contemporary and associate of René Chapallaz, Léon Gallet, and Le Corbusier, L'Éplattenier is considered one of the foremost exponents of Swiss Art Nouveau despite working almost exclusively in the town of La Chaux de Fonds, where from 1897 he taught at the school of decorative arts.

Pierre Jeanneret

Le Corbusier moved to Paris definitively in 1917 and began his own architectural practice with his cousin, Pierre Jeanneret (1896–1967), a partnership that would last until the 1950s, with an interruption in the World War II years
Pierre Jeanneret (22 March 1896 – 4 December 1967) was a Swiss architect who collaborated with his cousin, Charles Edouard Jeanneret (who assumed the pseudonym Le Corbusier), for about twenty years.

Dom-Ino House

This led him to his plan for the Dom-Ino House (1914–15).
Dom-Ino House is an open floor plan structure designed by noted architect Le Corbusier in 1914–1915.

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

Mies van der RoheMiesianMies
Two years later, between October 1910 and March 1911, he traveled to Germany and worked four months in the office Peter Behrens, where Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Walter Gropius were also working and learning. Like his contemporaries Frank Lloyd Wright and Mies van der Rohe, Le Corbusier did not have formal academic training as an architect.
Along with Alvar Aalto, Le Corbusier, Walter Gropius and Frank Lloyd Wright, he is regarded as one of the pioneers of modernist architecture.

Fondation Le Corbusier

These included the Maison La Roche/Albert Jeanneret (1923–1925), which now houses the Fondation Le Corbusier; the Maison Guiette in Antwerp, Belgium (1926); a residence for Jacques Lipchitz; the Maison Cook, and the Maison Planeix.
Fondation Le Corbusier is a private foundation and archive honoring the work of architect Le Corbusier (1887–1965).

Purism

Puristpurity of form
Rejecting Cubism as irrational and "romantic", the pair jointly published their manifesto, Après le cubisme and established a new artistic movement, Purism.
Purism was led by Amédée Ozenfant and Charles Edouard Jeanneret (Le Corbusier).

Athens Charter

Athens Charter for the Restoration of Historic MonumentsCharta of AthensCharter of Athens
The text, called The Athens Charter, after considerable editing by Le Corbusier and others, was finally published in 1943 and became an influential text for city planners in the 1950s and 1960s.
The Athens Charter (Charte d'Athènes) was a 1933 document about urban planning published by the Swiss architect Le Corbusier.

Villa Savoye

Villa Savoye et loge du jardinerVilla Savoye in PoissyVilla Savoye Poissy
The following year he began the Villa Savoye (1928–1931), which became one of the most famous of Le Corbusier's works, and an icon of modernist architecture.
It was designed by the Swiss architects Le Corbusier and his cousin, Pierre Jeanneret, and built between 1928 and 1931 using reinforced concrete.

Villa Cook

These included the Maison La Roche/Albert Jeanneret (1923–1925), which now houses the Fondation Le Corbusier; the Maison Guiette in Antwerp, Belgium (1926); a residence for Jacques Lipchitz; the Maison Cook, and the Maison Planeix.
Villa Cook or Maison Cook is a house built by the noted architect Le Corbusier, located in Boulogne-sur-Seine, France.

Weissenhof Estate

Maisons de la Weissenhof-SiedlungWeissenhofsiedlung'' housing exhibitionWerkbund exhibition 1927
In the same year, the German Werkbund organized an architectural exposition at the Weissenhof Estate Stuttgart.
Two of the buildings were designed by the French-Swiss architect Le Corbusier and these are now part of the World Heritage Site [[The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier, an Outstanding Contribution to the Modern Movement]], which was designated in 2016.

Josef Hoffmann

Josef Hoffman
In September 1907, he made his first trip outside of Switzerland, going to Italy; then that winter traveling through Budapest to Vienna, where he stayed for four months and met Gustav Klimt and tried, without success, to meet Josef Hoffmann.
This project served as a major precedent and inspiration for the modern architecture that would develop in the first half of the 20th century, for instance the early work of Le Corbusier.

Josep Lluís Sert

SertJ. L. SertJosep Lluis Sert
Later members included Josep Lluís Sert of Spain and Alvar Aalto of Finland.
That same year he moved to Paris, in response to an invitation from Le Corbusier to work for him (without payment).

Tsentrosoyuz building

CentrosoyuzCentrosoyuz buildingcontemporaneous work
At Melnikov's invitation he traveled to Moscow, where found that his writings had been published in Russian; he gave lectures and interviews, and between 1928 and 1932 he constructed an office building for the Tsentrosoyuz, the headquarters of Soviet trade unions.
The Tsentrosoyuz Building or Centrosoyuz Building is a government structure in Moscow, Russia, constructed in 1933 by Le Corbusier and Nikolai Kolli.

International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts

Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernesParis ExhibitionExhibition of Decorative Arts
An important early work of Le Corbusier was the Esprit Nouveau Pavilion, built for the 1925 Paris International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts, the event which later gave Art Deco its name.
In 1929 Mallet-Stevens led the creation of The French Union of Modern Artists which rebelled against the luxurious decorative styles shown at the Exposition, and, along with Le Corbusier, demanded architecture without ornament, built with inexpensive and mass-produced materials.

Ville Contemporaine

towers in a parkVille Contemporaine pour trois million habitants
At the Paris Salon d'Automne in 1922, he presented his plan for the Ville Contemporaine, a model city for three million people, whose residents would live and work in a group of identical sixty-story tall apartment buildings surrounded by lower zig-zag apartment blocks and a large park.
The Ville contemporaine (, Contemporary City) was an unrealized utopian planned community intended to house three million inhabitants designed by the French-Swiss architect Le Corbusier in 1922.