Lead paragraph

ledeleadbegan his pieceDon't bury the lead!lead sectionsleads
A lead paragraph (sometimes shortened to lead; also spelled lede) is the opening paragraph of an article, essay, book chapter, or other written work that summarizes its main ideas.wikipedia
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News style

Burying the Ledejournalistic writingnews writing
Journalistic leads emphasize grabbing the attention of the reader.
Writers are often admonished "Don't bury the lead!" to ensure that they present the most important facts first, rather than requiring the reader to go through several paragraphs to find them.

Five Ws

Circumstanceswho, what, when, where, why and how5 W
Most standard news leads include brief answers to the questions of who, what, why, when, where, and how the key event in the story took place.
By 1917, the "Five Ws" were being taught in high-school journalism classes, and by 1940, the tendency of journalists to address all of the "Five Ws" within the lead paragraph of an article was being characterized as old-fashioned and fallacious:

Opening sentence

opening linefirst few wordsopening of the piece
Opening sentence
The opening line is part or all of the opening sentence that may start the lead paragraph.

Introduction (writing)

introductionprolegomenaprolegomenon
Introduction (writing)
Lead paragraph

Nut graph

nutshell paragraph (or nut graf)
Nut graph
In most news stories, the essential facts of a story are included in the lede, the first sentence or two of the story.

Paragraph

paragraph breakdecimal numbering for its sectionsgraph
A lead paragraph (sometimes shortened to lead; also spelled lede) is the opening paragraph of an article, essay, book chapter, or other written work that summarizes its main ideas.

Encyclopedia

encyclopaediaencyclopedistencyclopedic
Encyclopedia leads tend to define the subject matter as well as emphasize the interesting points of the article.

Feature story

featuresfeaturefeature stories
Features and general articles in magazines tend to be somewhere between journalistic and encyclopedian in style and often lack a distinct lead paragraph entirely.

Magazine

magazinesjournalquarterly
Features and general articles in magazines tend to be somewhere between journalistic and encyclopedian in style and often lack a distinct lead paragraph entirely.

Book

booksmonographbiblio
Leads and book forewords vary enormously in length, intent and content.

Foreword

introductionintroductionsintroductory piece
Leads and book forewords vary enormously in length, intent and content.

Journalism

journalistreportagejournalistic
In journalism, there is the concept of an introductory or summary line or brief paragraph, located immediately above or below the headline, and typographically distinct from the body of the article.

Homograph

homographsvery similar appearance
The term is sometimes spelled "lede", with a claim it was a historical spelling intended to distinguish it from the homograph "lead": the metal strips of various thickness used to separate lines of type used in typesetting in the early 20th century.

Lead

Pblead orelead mining
The term is sometimes spelled "lede", with a claim it was a historical spelling intended to distinguish it from the homograph "lead": the metal strips of various thickness used to separate lines of type used in typesetting in the early 20th century.

Editorial

editorialseditorial pageop-ed
Editorial (also known as a "leader" in British English)

Inverted pyramid (journalism)

inverted pyramidburied the most important information in the last paragraphlast of a 25 paragraph story
Inverted pyramid (journalism)

Découvertes Gallimard

New HorizonsDécouvertesAppendix
Each chapter is built using journalistic methods, with a lead paragraph and intertitle.

Lede

* Lede (journalism) (US English), the lead paragraph of a composition

Adam Horowitz

He often caught editors off-guard with humorous leads or picking odd quotes.

Lead (disambiguation)

lead
Lead paragraph, the opening paragraph of an article

Al Attles

Alvin Attles
There is a probably apocryphal story to the effect that one of the sportswriters covering the game began his filing with the lede "HERSHEY, Pa. -- Wilt Chamberlain and Al Attles combined for 117 points last night as the Philadelphia Warriors defeated the New York Knicks 169-147."

Article (publishing)

articlesarticlecover story
The lead (sometimes spelled lede) sentence captures the attention of the reader and sums up the focus of the story.

Associated Press v. Meltwater U.S. Holdings, Inc.

one in the United States
In addition, each article contained a lede, a concise concentration of key information, which "takes significant journalistic skill to craft."

Peng (mythology)

PengKunDapeng
The first chapter ("Free and Easy Wandering" 逍遙遊 pinyin Xiao Yao You) begins with three versions of this parable; the lead paragraph, a quote from the Qixie (齊諧 "Universal Harmony", probably invented by Zhuangzi), and a quote from the Tang zhi wen Ji (湯之問棘 "Questions of Tang to Ji", cf. Liezi chapter 5, Tang wen 湯問).