Leah

First wifeLeaLeah bint LabanLeah RabinLia PaddanMoses' sister-in-law
Leah is described in the Hebrew Bible as the daughter of Laban.wikipedia
156 Related Articles

Jacob

Israelsons of JacobJacob (Israel)
She and her younger sister Rachel became the two concurrent wives of Hebrew patriarch Jacob.
Jacob had twelve sons and at least one daughter, by his two wives, Leah and Rachel, and by their handmaidens Bilhah and Zilpah.

Laban (Bible)

Labanhis uncleLabão Paddan
Leah is described in the Hebrew Bible as the daughter of Laban.
Laban tricked Jacob into marrying his elder daughter Leah instead.

Israelites

IsraeliteIsraelchildren of Israel
She had six sons, whose descendants became some of the Twelve Tribes of Israel.
According to the religious narrative of the Hebrew Bible, the Israelites' origin is traced back to the Biblical patriarchs and matriarchs Abraham and his wife Sarah, through their son Isaac and his wife Rebecca, and their son Jacob who was later called Israel, whence they derive their name, with his wives Leah and Rachel and the handmaids Zilpa and Bilhah.

Rachel

Rakelhis step-motherMother
She and her younger sister Rachel became the two concurrent wives of Hebrew patriarch Jacob.
Her older sister was Leah, Jacob's first wife.

Dinah

rape of DinahDinaDinah bint Jacob
She also had a daughter, Dinah. Leah is the mother of six of Jacob's sons, including his first four (Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah), and later two more (Issachar and Zebulun), and a daughter (Dinah).
In the Book of Genesis, Dinah was the daughter of Jacob, one of the patriarchs of the Israelites, and Leah, his first wife.

Simeon (son of Jacob)

SimeonBiblical character SimeonShimon
Leah is the mother of six of Jacob's sons, including his first four (Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah), and later two more (Issachar and Zebulun), and a daughter (Dinah).
According to the Book of Genesis, Simeon was the second son of Jacob and Leah, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Simeon.

Reuben (son of Jacob)

ReubenRubenRubem de Israel Paddan
Leah is the mother of six of Jacob's sons, including his first four (Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah), and later two more (Issachar and Zebulun), and a daughter (Dinah).
According to the Book of Genesis, Reuben or Re'uven (, Standard Rəʾuven Tiberian Rəʾûḇēn) was the eldest son of Jacob and Leah.

Torah

LawPentateuchMosaic Law
The Torah introduces Leah by describing her with the phrase, "Leah had tender eyes" (Genesis 29:17).
This is followed by the story of the three patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob), Joseph (Genesis 12–50 ) and the four matriarchs (Sarah, Rebekah, Leah, and Rachel).

Judah (son of Jacob)

JudahJudasJuda
Leah is the mother of six of Jacob's sons, including his first four (Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah), and later two more (Issachar and Zebulun), and a daughter (Dinah).
Judah (, Standard Yəhuda Tiberian Yehuḏā) was, according to the Book of Genesis, the fourth son of Jacob and Leah, the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Judah.

Issachar

Issacar de Israel Paddan
Leah is the mother of six of Jacob's sons, including his first four (Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah), and later two more (Issachar and Zebulun), and a daughter (Dinah).
Issachar/Yissachar was, according to the Book of Exodus, a son of Jacob and Leah (the fifth son of Leah, and ninth son of Jacob), and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Issachar.

Rebecca

RebekahRebeckaYoung Rebeccah
But people were saying, "Laban has two daughters and his sister, Rebekah, has two sons. The older daughter (Leah) will marry the older son (Esau), and the younger daughter (Rachel) will marry the younger son (Jacob)." This cave also houses the graves of Abraham and Sarah, and Isaac and Rebekah.
Rebecca and Isaac were one of the four couples that some believe are buried in the Cave of the Patriarchs, the other three being Adam and Eve, Abraham and Sarah, and Jacob and Leah.

Zebulun

ZabulonZebulom de Israel PaddanZebulon
Leah is the mother of six of Jacob's sons, including his first four (Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah), and later two more (Issachar and Zebulun), and a daughter (Dinah).
Zebulun (also Zebulon, Zabulon or Zaboules; or or, Tiberian Hebrew ', Standard Hebrew '/) was, according to the Books of Genesis and Numbers, the sixth and last son of Jacob and Leah, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Zebulun.

Zilpah

veZilpa Mayan
Leah responds by offering her handmaid Zilpah to Jacob, and names and raises the two sons (Gad and Asher) that Zilpah bears.
In the Book of Genesis, Zilpah (זִלְפָּה "meaning uncertain," Standard Hebrew Zilpa, Tiberian Hebrew Zilpāh) was Leah's handmaid, presumed slave, whom Leah gave to Jacob "to wife" to bear him children.

Naphtali

Naftali Mut
Seeing that she is unable to conceive, Rachel offers her handmaid Bilhah to Jacob, and names and raises the two sons (Dan and Naphtali) that Bilhah bears.
The text of the Torah states that the name of Naphtali may refer to the struggle between Rachel and Leah for the favours of Jacob; Bilhah was the handmaid of Rachel, who had thought herself to be infertile, and had persuaded Jacob to have a child with Bilhah as a proxy for having one with herself.

Bilhah

BilaBila Muts
Seeing that she is unable to conceive, Rachel offers her handmaid Bilhah to Jacob, and names and raises the two sons (Dan and Naphtali) that Bilhah bears.
He was taken into captivity but redeemed by Laban, Rachel and Leah's father, who gave Rotheus a wife named Euna, who was their mother.

Cave of the Patriarchs

cave of MachpelahCave of MachpelaIbrahimi Mosque
She is thought to be buried in the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron alongside Jacob.
The tractate continues by discussing another theory, that the name stems from it being the tomb of the three couples, Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebecca, Jacob and Leah, considered to be the Patriarchs and Matriarchs of the Abrahamic religions:

Names of God in Judaism

GodHashemnames of God
Each woman desired to grow spiritually in her avodat HaShem (service of God), and therefore sought closeness to the tzadik (Jacob) who is God's personal emissary in this world.
It appears in the names "God of Abraham" (Elohai Avraham); "God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob" (Elohai Avraham, Elohai Yitzchak ve Elohai Yaʿaqov); and "God of Sarah, Rebecca, Leah, and Rachel" (Elohai Sara, Elohai Rivka, Elohai Leah ve Elohai Rakhel).

Mandrake

mandragoramandrake rootmandrakes
One day, Leah's firstborn son Reuben returns from the field with mandrakes for his mother.
In Genesis 30:14, Reuben, the eldest son of Jacob and Leah, finds mandrake in a field.

Isaac

SonYitzchak/IsaacYitzhak
This cave also houses the graves of Abraham and Sarah, and Isaac and Rebekah.
According to local tradition, the graves of Isaac and Rebekah, along with the graves of Abraham and Sarah and Jacob and Leah, are in the Cave of the Patriarchs.

Joseph (Genesis)

JosephJoseph in Potiphar's houseBiblical Joseph
After that, God remembers Rachel and gives her two sons, Joseph and Benjamin.

Sarah

SaraiSaraIsaac's mother
This cave also houses the graves of Abraham and Sarah, and Isaac and Rebekah.
Sarah is believed to be buried in the Cave of the Patriarchs (known by Muslims as the Sanctuary of Abraham). The compound, located in the ancient city of Hebron, is the second holiest site for Jews (after the Temple Mount in Jerusalem), and is also venerated by Christians and Muslims, both of whom have traditions which maintain that the site is the burial place of three biblical couples; Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebecca, and Jacob and Leah.

Purgatorio

PurgatoryEarthly ParadiseMountain of Purgatory
Dante Alighieri's Purgatorio includes a dream of Rachel and Leah, which inspired illustrations by Dante Gabriel Rossetti and others:
On these steps, just before the dawn of Wednesday morning, Dante has his third dream: a vision of Leah and Rachel.

Hebrew Bible

biblicalBibleHebrew
Leah is described in the Hebrew Bible as the daughter of Laban.

Polygamy

polygamouspolygamistpolygamists
She and her younger sister Rachel became the two concurrent wives of Hebrew patriarch Jacob.

Rashi

Rabbi Shlomo YitzchakiRabbi Schlomo, son of YitzhakRashi script
The commentary of Rashi cites a Rabbinic interpretation of how Leah's eyes became weak.