Leander Starr Jameson

JamesonSir Leander Starr JamesonDr. JamesonDoctor JamesonDr L. S. JamesonJameson of Down StreetL. S. JamesonLeander JamesonLeander Starr '''JamesonLeander Starr Jameson trial
Sir Leander Starr Jameson, 1st Baronet, (9 February 1853 – 26 November 1917) was a British colonial politician who was best known for his involvement in the Jameson Raid.wikipedia
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Jameson Raid

Dr. Jameson's RaidAftermathfailed raid
Sir Leander Starr Jameson, 1st Baronet, (9 February 1853 – 26 November 1917) was a British colonial politician who was best known for his involvement in the Jameson Raid.
The Jameson Raid (29 December 1895 – 2 January 1896) was a botched raid against the South African Republic (commonly known as the Transvaal) carried out by British colonial statesman Leander Starr Jameson and his Company troops ("police" in the employ of Alfred Beit's and Cecil Rhodes' British South Africa Company) and Bechuanaland policemen over the New Year weekend of 1895–96.

Robert William Jameson

He was born on 9 February 1853, of the Jameson family of Edinburgh, the son of Robert William Jameson (1805–1868), a Writer to the Signet, and Christian Pringle, daughter of Major-General Pringle of Symington House.
He was the father of Sir Leander Starr Jameson, South African statesman and prime minister, and the nephew of Professor Robert Jameson of the University of Edinburgh.

Robert Jameson

JamesonDr Robert JamesonJameson, Robert
Robert William and Christian Jameson had twelve children, of whom Leander Starr was the youngest, born at Stranraer, Wigtownshire (now part of Dumfries and Galloway), in the south-west of Scotland, a great-nephew of Professor Robert Jameson, Regius Professor of Natural History at the University of Edinburgh.." Fort's biography of Jameson notes that Starr's '...chief Gamaliel, however, was a Professor Grant, a man of advanced age, who had been a pupil of his great-uncle, the Professor of Natural History at Edinburgh.
Robert Jameson was the great-uncle of Sir Leander Starr Jameson, Bt, KCMG, CB, British colonial official and inspiration for the Jameson Raid.

InDuna

izinDunainDunasInduna Incoola
Jameson was for some time the inDuna of the Matabele king's favourite regiment, the Imbeza.
Leander Starr Jameson, a British physician, was awarded the title of inDuna by the Matabele chief Lobengula after he had successfully treated the chief's gout.

British South Africa Company

British South Africa Company (BSAC)Chartered CompanyChartereds
Jameson's status as an inDuna gave him advantages, and in 1888 he successfully exerted his influence with Lobengula to induce the chieftain to grant the concessions to the agents of Rhodes which led to the formation of the British South Africa Company; and when the company proceeded to open up Mashonaland, Jameson abandoned his medical practice and joined the pioneer expedition of 1890. Seizing on this weakness, and a discontent with the British South Africa Company, the Matabele revolted in March 1896 in what is now celebrated in Zimbabwe as the First War of Independence – the Second Matabele War.
Rhodes and Jameson made plans to assist, and probably to promote, a Johannesburg rising.

If—

Ifhomonymous poempoem
Longford also notes that Rudyard Kipling wrote the poem If— with Leander Starr Jameson in mind as an inspiration for the characteristics he recommended young people to live by (notably Kipling's son, to whom the poem is addressed in the last lines).
"If—" is a poem by English Nobel laureate Rudyard Kipling, written circa 1895 as a tribute to Leander Starr Jameson.

First Matabele War

First1893 Matabele WarFirst Matebele War
In 1893, Jameson was a key figure in the First Matabele War and involved in incidents that led to the massacre of the Shangani Patrol.
Cecil Rhodes, who was Prime Minister of the Cape Colony and Leander Starr Jameson, the Administrator of Mashonaland also tried to avoid war to prevent loss of confidence in the future of the territory.

Second Boer War

Boer WarAnglo-Boer WarSouth African War
The Jameson Raid was later cited by Winston Churchill as a major factor in bringing about the Boer War of 1899 to 1902.
Dr. Leander Starr Jameson, who led the raid, intended to encourage an uprising of the uitlanders in Johannesburg.

Northern Ndebele people

NdebeleMatabeleNdebele people
There he rapidly acquired a great reputation as a medical man, and, besides numbering President Kruger and the Matabele chief Lobengula among his patients, came much into contact with Cecil Rhodes. Seizing on this weakness, and a discontent with the British South Africa Company, the Matabele revolted in March 1896 in what is now celebrated in Zimbabwe as the First War of Independence – the Second Matabele War.
Hoping for a quick victory, Leander Starr Jameson sent his British forces to attack the capital KwaBulawayo and capture Lobengula.

Administrative posts of the British South Africa Company in Southern Rhodesia

AdministratorAdministrator of Southern RhodesiaAdministrator of the British colony
In 1891 Jameson succeeded Colquhoun as Administrator of Mashonaland.
18 September 1891 – 7 October 1893: Dr Leander Starr Jameson KCMG, CB

Shangani Patrol

34 troopersambushed and annihilatedBattle of Shangani
In 1893, Jameson was a key figure in the First Matabele War and involved in incidents that led to the massacre of the Shangani Patrol.
Matabele warriors began the wholesale slaughter of Mashonas in the vicinity of Fort Victoria in July that year, and an indaba (tribal conference) organised by Company official Leander Starr Jameson to end the conflict ended with violence, and dispersion by force.

Stranraer

RAF StranraerStranraer, ScotlandCastle Kennedy Gardens
Robert William and Christian Jameson had twelve children, of whom Leander Starr was the youngest, born at Stranraer, Wigtownshire (now part of Dumfries and Galloway), in the south-west of Scotland, a great-nephew of Professor Robert Jameson, Regius Professor of Natural History at the University of Edinburgh.." Fort's biography of Jameson notes that Starr's '...chief Gamaliel, however, was a Professor Grant, a man of advanced age, who had been a pupil of his great-uncle, the Professor of Natural History at Edinburgh.
Leander Starr Jameson, leader of the Jameson Raid, a precursor of the Second Boer War, and Prime Minister of the Cape Colony, and editor of the Wigtownshire Free Press

Cecil Rhodes

RhodesCecil John RhodesCecil
There he rapidly acquired a great reputation as a medical man, and, besides numbering President Kruger and the Matabele chief Lobengula among his patients, came much into contact with Cecil Rhodes.
Rhodes is buried alongside Leander Starr Jameson and 34 British soldiers killed in the Shangani Patrol.

Second Matabele War

Matabele campaignFirst Chimurengafirst outbreak of rebellion against European rule
Seizing on this weakness, and a discontent with the British South Africa Company, the Matabele revolted in March 1896 in what is now celebrated in Zimbabwe as the First War of Independence – the Second Matabele War.
Only a few months earlier, the British South Africa Company's Administrator General for Matabeleland, Leander Starr Jameson, had sent most of his troops and armaments to fight the Transvaal Republic in the ill-fated Jameson Raid.

Lobengula

King LobengulaKing Lobengula’sLo Bengula
There he rapidly acquired a great reputation as a medical man, and, besides numbering President Kruger and the Matabele chief Lobengula among his patients, came much into contact with Cecil Rhodes.
Inkos'uLobengula gave his agreement to Cecil Rhodes only when his friend, Dr. Leander Starr Jameson, who had once treated Inkos'uLobengula for gout, proposed to secure money and weaponry for the Matabele in addition to a pledge that any people who came to dig would be considered as living in his kingdom.

Paul Kruger

KrugerPresident KrugerPresident Paul Kruger
There he rapidly acquired a great reputation as a medical man, and, besides numbering President Kruger and the Matabele chief Lobengula among his patients, came much into contact with Cecil Rhodes.
Conferring with the Colonial Office, Rhodes pondered the co-ordination of an uitlander revolt in Johannesburg with British military intervention, and had a force of about 500 marshalled on the Bechuanaland–Transvaal frontier under Leander Starr Jameson, the Chartered Company's administrator in Matabeleland.

Bulawayo

kwaBulawayoAscot PiazzaBulawayan
Jameson is buried alongside Rhodes at Malindidzimu Hill, a granite hill in the Matobo National Park, 40 km south of Bulawayo.
On 4 November 1893, Leander Starr Jameson declared Bulawayo a settlement under the rule of the British South Africa Company.

Frederick Russell Burnham

Frederick R. BurnhamBurnhamFrederick Burnham
Against over 50,000 Matabele held up in their stronghold of the Matobo Hills as the settlers mounted patrols under Burnham, Baden-Powell, and Selous.
Leander Starr Jameson, the Company's Chief Magistrate in Mashonaland, hoped to defeat the Matabele quickly by capturing Lobengula at his royal town of Bulawayo, and so sent Burnham and a small group of scouts ahead to report on the situation there.

Joseph Chamberlain

ChamberlainJoseph The Right Honourable '''Joseph Chamberlain
Joseph Chamberlain informed Salisbury on Boxing Day that an uprising was expected, and was aware that an invasion would be launched, but was not sure when.
Chamberlain ordered Sir Hercules Robinson, Governor-General of the Cape Colony, to repudiate the actions of Leander Starr Jameson and warned Rhodes that the Company's Charter would be in danger if it was discovered that the Cape Prime Minister was involved in the Raid.

Progressive Party (Cape Colony)

Progressive PartyProgressivesProgressive
In 1903 Jameson was put forward as the leader of the Progressive (British) Party in the Cape Colony.
However, the Progressives came to power on 18 June 1900 under Prime Minister John Gordon Sprigg, and later under Prime Minister Leander Starr Jameson.

Middleton Jameson

One of these was by one of his older brothers, Middleton Jameson, R.A. (1851–1919), otherwise known as 'Midge', to whom he was devoted.
One of the older brothers of Sir Leander Starr Jameson, British South African statesman, notable for his leadership of the Jameson Raid.

Uitlander

uitlanders
The idea was to foment unrest among foreign workers (Uitlanders) in the territory, and use the outbreak of open revolt as an excuse to invade and annex the territory.
Dr Jameson's force invaded, but the expected uprising never took place; the invading force were quickly overpowered and arrested.

Rudyard Kipling

KiplingKipling, RudyardKiplingesque
Longford also notes that Rudyard Kipling wrote the poem If— with Leander Starr Jameson in mind as an inspiration for the characteristics he recommended young people to live by (notably Kipling's son, to whom the poem is addressed in the last lines).
With his new reputation as Poet of the Empire, Kipling was warmly received by some of the most influential politicians of the Cape Colony, including Rhodes, Sir Alfred Milner, and Leander Starr Jameson.

Zimbabwe

🇿🇼 RhodesiaZimbabwean
Seizing on this weakness, and a discontent with the British South Africa Company, the Matabele revolted in March 1896 in what is now celebrated in Zimbabwe as the First War of Independence – the Second Matabele War.
Cecil Rhodes and other early white pioneers like Leander Starr Jameson are buried in these hills at a site named World's View.

Foreign Enlistment Act 1870

Foreign Enlistment ActForeign Enlistment Act 1870 (UK)Foreign Enlistment Act of 1819
The Jameson Raiders arrived in England at the end of February, 1896 to face prosecution under the Foreign Enlistment Act 1870 styled "R. v Jameson, Willoughby and others".
The last successful prosecution occurred in 1896 in the Leander Starr Jameson trial.