Leaning Tower of Pisa

Tower of PisaLeaning TowerCampanilecounterpart in Pisa(Leaning-)Tower-of-EddyItaly's Leaning Tower of Pisaleaning belltowerPisa TowerTorre di PisaTorre Pendente
The Leaning Tower of Pisa (Torre pendente di Pisa) or simply the Tower of Pisa (Torre di Pisa ) is the campanile, or freestanding bell tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa, known worldwide for its nearly four-degree lean, the result of an unstable foundation.wikipedia
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Pisa

Pisa, ItalyPisanPisans
The Leaning Tower of Pisa (Torre pendente di Pisa) or simply the Tower of Pisa (Torre di Pisa ) is the campanile, or freestanding bell tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa, known worldwide for its nearly four-degree lean, the result of an unstable foundation.
Although Pisa is known worldwide for its leaning tower (the bell tower of the city's cathedral), the city of over 91,104 residents (around 200,000 with the metropolitan area) contains more than 20 other historic churches, several medieval palaces, and various bridges across the Arno.

Pisa Baptistery

Pisa BaptistryBaptistryBaptistery
The tower is situated behind the Pisa Cathedral and is the third-oldest structure in the city's Cathedral Square (Piazza del Duomo), after the cathedral and the Pisa Baptistry.
Construction started in 1152 to replace an older baptistery, and when it was completed in 1363, it became the second building, in chronological order, in the Piazza dei Miracoli, near the Duomo di Pisa and the cathedral's free-standing campanile, the famous Leaning Tower of Pisa.

Bonanno Pisano

BonannoBonanno da Pisa
For many years, the design was attributed to Guglielmo and Bonanno Pisano, a well-known 12th-century resident artist of Pisa, known for his bronze casting, particularly in the Pisa Duomo.
Giorgio Vasari wrongly attributed the realization of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to him in his Vite.

Bell tower

belfrycampaniletower
The Leaning Tower of Pisa (Torre pendente di Pisa) or simply the Tower of Pisa (Torre di Pisa ) is the campanile, or freestanding bell tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa, known worldwide for its nearly four-degree lean, the result of an unstable foundation.
Perhaps the most famous European free-standing bell tower, however, is the so-called "Leaning Tower of Pisa", which is the campanile of the Duomo di Pisa in Pisa, Italy.

Galileo's Leaning Tower of Pisa experiment

dropped ballsdropped two cannonballsdropped two objects of unequal mass from the Leaning Tower of Pisa
Between 1589 and 1592, Galileo Galilei, who lived in Pisa at the time, is said to have dropped two cannonballs of different masses from the tower to demonstrate that their speed of descent was independent of their mass. The primary source for this is the biography Racconto istorico della vita di Galileo Galilei (Historical Account of the Life of Galileo Galilei), written by Galileo's pupil and secretary Vincenzo Viviani in 1654, but only published in 1717, long after his death.
Between 1589–92, the Italian scientist Galileo Galilei (then professor of mathematics at the University of Pisa) is said to have dropped two spheres of different masses from the Leaning Tower of Pisa to demonstrate that their time of descent was independent of their mass, according to a biography by Galileo's pupil Vincenzo Viviani, composed in 1654 and published in 1717.

Piazza dei Miracoli

cathedral of PisaPiazza del DuomoDuomo
The tower is situated behind the Pisa Cathedral and is the third-oldest structure in the city's Cathedral Square (Piazza del Duomo), after the cathedral and the Pisa Baptistry. For many years, the design was attributed to Guglielmo and Bonanno Pisano, a well-known 12th-century resident artist of Pisa, known for his bronze casting, particularly in the Pisa Duomo.
Considered sacred by the Catholic Church, its owner, the square is dominated by four great religious edifices: the Pisa Cathedral, the Pisa Baptistry, the Campanile, and the Camposanto Monumentale (Monumental Cemetery).

Mass

inertial massgravitational massweight
Between 1589 and 1592, Galileo Galilei, who lived in Pisa at the time, is said to have dropped two cannonballs of different masses from the tower to demonstrate that their speed of descent was independent of their mass. The primary source for this is the biography Racconto istorico della vita di Galileo Galilei (Historical Account of the Life of Galileo Galilei), written by Galileo's pupil and secretary Vincenzo Viviani in 1654, but only published in 1717, long after his death.
The first experiments demonstrating the universality of free-fall were—according to scientific ‘folklore’—conducted by Galileo obtained by dropping objects from the Leaning Tower of Pisa.

Pisa Cathedral

Cathedral of PisacathedralDuomo
The tower is situated behind the Pisa Cathedral and is the third-oldest structure in the city's Cathedral Square (Piazza del Duomo), after the cathedral and the Pisa Baptistry.

San Nicola, Pisa

San NicolaSan Nicola churchSan Nicola in Pisa
A 2001 study seems to indicate Diotisalvi was the original architect, due to the time of construction and affinity with other Diotisalvi works, notably the bell tower of San Nicola and the Baptistery, both in Pisa.
The octangular bell tower, the second most famous in the city after the Leaning Tower, most likely dates to 1170.

Diotisalvi

A 2001 study seems to indicate Diotisalvi was the original architect, due to the time of construction and affinity with other Diotisalvi works, notably the bell tower of San Nicola and the Baptistery, both in Pisa.
Inside there is a winding staircase, with a wall only on the external part, unlikely the Leaning Tower of Pisa.

Romanesque architecture

RomanesqueRomanesque styleLate Romanesque
It was built by Tommaso di Andrea Pisano, who succeeded in harmonizing the Gothic elements of the belfry with the Romanesque style of the tower.
In Italy there are a number of large free-standing towers that are circular, the most famous of these being the Leaning Tower of Pisa.

Galileo Galilei

GalileoGalileanGalilei
Between 1589 and 1592, Galileo Galilei, who lived in Pisa at the time, is said to have dropped two cannonballs of different masses from the tower to demonstrate that their speed of descent was independent of their mass. The primary source for this is the biography Racconto istorico della vita di Galileo Galilei (Historical Account of the Life of Galileo Galilei), written by Galileo's pupil and secretary Vincenzo Viviani in 1654, but only published in 1717, long after his death.
A biography by Galileo's pupil Vincenzo Viviani stated that Galileo had dropped balls of the same material, but different masses, from the Leaning Tower of Pisa to demonstrate that their time of descent was independent of their mass. This was contrary to what Aristotle had taught: that heavy objects fall faster than lighter ones, in direct proportion to weight.

List of leaning towers

leaning towerleaning or sloping towerLeaning Tower of Patchogue
The most famous example is the Leaning Tower in Pisa, Italy.

Leaning Tower of Niles

Leaning Tower YMCA
The Leaning Tower of Niles is a half-size replica of the Leaning Tower of Pisa.

Leaning Tower of Suurhusen

spire of the Suurhusen Church
Two German churches have challenged the tower's status as the world's most lop-sided building: the 15th-century square Leaning Tower of Suurhusen and the 14th-century bell tower in the town of Bad Frankenhausen.
The Suurhusen steeple remains the world's most leaning tower that is unintentionally tilted, beating the world-famous Leaning Tower of Pisa by 1.22°.

Bad Frankenhausen

FrankenhausenBad Frankenhausen/KyffhäuserFrankenhausen, Germany
Two German churches have challenged the tower's status as the world's most lop-sided building: the 15th-century square Leaning Tower of Suurhusen and the 14th-century bell tower in the town of Bad Frankenhausen.

List of buildings in King's Lynn

Custom HouseHanseatic WarehouseKing's Lynn
This compares to 3.98 degrees on the Leaning Tower of Pisa.

Great Mosque of al-Nuri (Mosul)

Great Mosque of al-NuriAl-Hadba' Minaretal-Hadba’ Minaret
It is also nicknamed by some as Iraq's 'Tower of Pisa', as the mosque's signature tilt was compared to that of the Torre di Pisa in Italy.

Carlo Antonio Dal Pozzo

Dal PozzoCarlo Antonio
Between his many works, he ordered to build the homonym chapel in the Camposanto Monumentale in Pisa (1594), he made the Collegio Puteano to host some students from Piedmont (1605) and he made cast the homonym bell in the leaning tower (1606).

Tour de Pise

It was charted in 1951 by the French Antarctic Expedition and named by them for the infamous Tower of Pisa.

Cathedral

cathedralscathedral churchproto-cathedral
The Leaning Tower of Pisa (Torre pendente di Pisa) or simply the Tower of Pisa (Torre di Pisa ) is the campanile, or freestanding bell tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa, known worldwide for its nearly four-degree lean, the result of an unstable foundation.

Foundation (engineering)

foundationfoundationsfootings
The Leaning Tower of Pisa (Torre pendente di Pisa) or simply the Tower of Pisa (Torre di Pisa ) is the campanile, or freestanding bell tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa, known worldwide for its nearly four-degree lean, the result of an unstable foundation.

Bronze

bronzesbronzewaresilicon bronze
For many years, the design was attributed to Guglielmo and Bonanno Pisano, a well-known 12th-century resident artist of Pisa, known for his bronze casting, particularly in the Pisa Duomo.

Monreale

Monreale CathedralSan Martino delle Scalegoldground mosaic
Pisano left Pisa in 1185 for Monreale, Sicily, only to come back and die in his home town.

Baptistery

baptistrybaptisteriesbaptistries
A 2001 study seems to indicate Diotisalvi was the original architect, due to the time of construction and affinity with other Diotisalvi works, notably the bell tower of San Nicola and the Baptistery, both in Pisa.