Lech, Czech, and Rus

LechČechRusBohemusForefather CzechLech and CzechCzechForefather Čechfounder of PolandLech and Čech
Lech, Czech and Rus refers to a founding myth of three Slavic peoples: the Poles (or Lechites), the Czechs, and the Rus' people.wikipedia
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Czechs

CzechBohemianCzech people
Lech, Czech and Rus refers to a founding myth of three Slavic peoples: the Poles (or Lechites), the Czechs, and the Rus' people.
They formed a principality in the 9th century, the Duchy of Bohemia, under the Přemyslid dynasty which was part of the Great Moravia under Svatopluk I. According to mythology, the founding father of the Czech people were Forefather Čech, who according to legend brought the tribe of Czechs into its land.

Czech Republic

🇨🇿CzechCZE
A variant of this legend, involving only two brothers, is also known in the Czech Republic.
The name comes from the Slavic tribe (Češi, Čechové) and, according to legend, their leader Čech, who brought them to Bohemia, to settle on Říp Mountain.

Coat of arms of Poland

White EaglePolish eaglePolish coat of arms
He named his settlement Gniezno (Polish gniazdo - 'nest') in commemoration and adopted the White Eagle as his coat-of-arms.
According to legend, the White Eagle emblem originated when Poland's legendary founder Lech saw a white eagle's nest.

Říp Mountain

Říphistorical mountain Rip
Rus went to the east, Čech headed to the west to settle on the Říp Mountain rising up from the Bohemian hilly countryside, while Lech traveled north.
According to a traditional legend, first recorded by the ancient Czech chronicler Cosmas of Prague in the early 12th century, Říp was the place where the first Slavs, led by Forefather Čech, settled.

Lechites

LechiticLechLechitians
Lech, Czech and Rus refers to a founding myth of three Slavic peoples: the Poles (or Lechites), the Czechs, and the Rus' people.
In Polish literature Lech was also the name of the legendary founder of Poland.

Ancient Bohemian Legends

Staré pověsti české
The apparently best known version by the 19th century author Alois Jirásek appeared in his retelling of Staré pověsti české (Old Bohemian Legends).
They were led by Forefather Čech and his brother, Lech.

Cosmas of Prague

CosmasCosmas chronicleKosmas
Čech is first mentioned in Latin as Bohemus in the Cosmas' chronicle of 1125.
The first book, completed in 1119, starts with the creation of the world and ends in the year 1038. It describes the legendary foundation of the Bohemian state by the oldest Bohemians around the year 600 (Duke Bohemus, Duke Krok and his three daughters), Duchess Libuše and the foundation of Přemyslid dynasty by her marriage with Přemysl, old bloody wars, Duke Bořivoj and the introduction of Christianity in Bohemia, Saint Wenceslaus and his grandmother Saint Ludmila, reign of the three Boleslavs, the life of Saint Adalbert and bloody wars after year 1000.

Lechia

Lehistan
The legend also attempts to explain the etymology of the ethnonyms: Lechia (another name for Poland including Silesia), the Czech lands (including Bohemia, Moravia, and also Silesia), and Rus'. Jan Kochanowski, a prominent Renaissance Polish man of letters, in his essay on the origin of the Slavs, makes no mention of the third "brother", Rus.
According to legend, the name derives from the first ruler of Poland, Lech.

Wenceslaus Hajek

Václav Hájek of LibočanWenceslaus Hajek of LibočanWenceslaus Hájek
While the older chronicles from 14th century (such as those of Dalimil, Wenceslaus Hajek and Přibík Pulkava z Radenína) the location of Čech and Lech's homeland Charvaty is not specified, in the work of Jirásek it is more closely determined; Za Tatrami, v rovinách při řece Visle rozkládala se od nepaměti charvátská země, část prvotní veliké vlasti slovanské (Behind the Tatra Mountains, in the plains of the river Vistula, stretched from immemorial time Charvátská country (probably White Croatia), the initial part of the great Slavic homeland), and V té charvátské zemi bytovala četná plemena, příbuzná jazykem, mravy, způsobem života (In Charvátská existed numerous tribes, related by language, manners, and way of life).
His famous Annales cover the History of the Czech lands from the legendary early medieval rulers Lech, Czech, and Rus up to the coronation of King Ferdinand I in 1526.

Chronicle of Dalimil

DalimilDalimil's Chronicle
While the older chronicles from 14th century (such as those of Dalimil, Wenceslaus Hajek and Přibík Pulkava z Radenína) the location of Čech and Lech's homeland Charvaty is not specified, in the work of Jirásek it is more closely determined; Za Tatrami, v rovinách při řece Visle rozkládala se od nepaměti charvátská země, část prvotní veliké vlasti slovanské (Behind the Tatra Mountains, in the plains of the river Vistula, stretched from immemorial time Charvátská country (probably White Croatia), the initial part of the great Slavic homeland), and V té charvátské zemi bytovala četná plemena, příbuzná jazykem, mravy, způsobem života (In Charvátská existed numerous tribes, related by language, manners, and way of life).
The events in the chronicle seem to simply reinterpret the myth of Lech, Czech, and Rus.

Lech Poznań

LechLech II PoznańKKS Lech Poznań
Lech Poznań, a Polish professional football club based in Poznań
The club is named after Lech, the legendary founder of the Polish nation.

Rus' people

Rusthe RusRussian
Lech, Czech and Rus refers to a founding myth of three Slavic peoples: the Poles (or Lechites), the Czechs, and the Rus' people.
The medieval legend of three brothers, one named Rus, had also its predecessor in very similar legend from ancient Armenians with almost the same classical name (studies by D.J. Marr). Furthermore, Kiev was founded centuries before the Rus' rule.

Wielkopolska Chronicle

The Chronicle of Greater Poland
The three legendary brothers appear together in the Wielkopolska Chronicle, compiled in the early 14th century.
Among other stories, legends, and historical narratives, the Wielkopolska Chronicle contains the first recorded version of the legend of Lech, Čech, and Rus, as well as a Polish version of the story of Waldere and Hildegyth (also Waltharius), a popular tale of medieval Europe, transplanted onto Polish soil.

Early Slavs

SlavsSlavicearly Slavic
The legends also agree on the location of the homeland of the Early Slavic peoples in Eastern Europe.
Lech, Čech, and Rus

Slavs

SlavicSlavSlavonic
The legend also attempts to explain the etymology of the ethnonyms: Lechia (another name for Poland including Silesia), the Czech lands (including Bohemia, Moravia, and also Silesia), and Rus'. Jan Kochanowski, a prominent Renaissance Polish man of letters, in his essay on the origin of the Slavs, makes no mention of the third "brother", Rus. There are multiple versions of the legend, including several regional variants throughout West Slavic, and to lesser extent, other Slavic countries that mention only one or two brothers.
Lech and Čech

Lech (Bohemian prince)

Lech
Lech – a Bohemian prince who was killed in the war with Charlemagne's army in 805
Lech, Čech, and Rus

Kyi, Shchek and Khoryv

Kyifounders of KyivLubid
Kyi, Shchek and Khoryv
Lech, Czech, and Rus

Qais Abdur Rashid

Qaisfour 'greater' tribal groups
Qais Abdur Rashid, whose three legendary sons are said to have founded the modern Pashtun nation
Lech, Czech, and Rus, three legendary brothers who are said to have founded the three modern Slavic nations of Poles (or Lechites), Czechs, and Rus' (or Russians, Ukrainians, and Belarusians)

West Slavs

West SlavicWestern SlavicSlavic
There are multiple versions of the legend, including several regional variants throughout West Slavic, and to lesser extent, other Slavic countries that mention only one or two brothers.

Origin myth

founding mythetiological mytheponymous ancestor
Lech, Czech and Rus refers to a founding myth of three Slavic peoples: the Poles (or Lechites), the Czechs, and the Rus' people. The three also figure into the origin myth of South Slavic peoples in some legends.

South Slavs

South SlavicSlavicSouth Slav
The three also figure into the origin myth of South Slavic peoples in some legends.

Gord (archaeology)

gordgradgród
He named his settlement Gniezno (Polish gniazdo - 'nest') in commemoration and adopted the White Eagle as his coat-of-arms.

Gniezno

GnesenGnesen (Gniezno)Gniezno Cathedral
He named his settlement Gniezno (Polish gniazdo - 'nest') in commemoration and adopted the White Eagle as his coat-of-arms.

Polish language

Polishplpol.
He named his settlement Gniezno (Polish gniazdo - 'nest') in commemoration and adopted the White Eagle as his coat-of-arms.

Coat of arms

armscoat-of-armscoats of arms
He named his settlement Gniezno (Polish gniazdo - 'nest') in commemoration and adopted the White Eagle as his coat-of-arms.