Lectin

lectinslectin protein lectin lectin or agglutinincarbohydrate-binding proteinlectin or agglutininlectinology
Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that are highly specific for sugar groups of other molecules.wikipedia
305 Related Articles

Ricin

ricin toxin
Some lectins are beneficial, such as CLEC11A, which promotes bone growth, while others may be powerful toxins such as ricin.
Ricin, a lectin (a carbohydrate-binding protein) produced in the seeds of the castor oil plant, Ricinus communis, is a highly potent toxin.

Concanavalin A

concanavalinCon AConA
Lectins from legume plants, such as PHA or concanavalin A, have been used widely as model systems to understand the molecular basis of how proteins recognize carbohydrates, because they are relatively easy to obtain and have a wide variety of sugar specificities.
Concanavalin A (ConA) is a lectin (carbohydrate-binding protein) originally extracted from the jack-bean, Canavalia ensiformis.

Peanut agglutinin

Peanut agglutinin (PNA) is plant lectin protein derived from the fruits of Arachis hypogaea.

Jacalin

Jacalin is a plant based lectin, but not a legume lectin, found in jackfruit.

Wheat germ agglutinin

WGAWheat-germ agglutinin
Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is a lectin that protects wheat (Triticum) from insects, yeast and bacteria.

Protein

proteinsproteinaceousstructural proteins
Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that are highly specific for sugar groups of other molecules.
Lectins are sugar-binding proteins which are highly specific for their sugar moieties.

Mannose 6-phosphate

mannose-6-phosphateD-mannose 6-phosphateMan-6-P
Mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) is a molecule bound by lectin in the immune system.

CLEC11A

Some lectins are beneficial, such as CLEC11A, which promotes bone growth, while others may be powerful toxins such as ricin.
This gene encodes a member of the C-type lectin superfamily.

Canavalia ensiformis

jack beanC. EnsiformisCommon Jack-bean
It is also the source of concanavalin A, a lectin used in biotechnology applications, such as lectin affinity chromatography.

Mannan-binding lectin

mannose-binding lectinMBLMBL2
Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), also called mannan-binding lectin or mannan-binding protein (MBP), is a lectin that is instrumental in innate immunity as an opsonin and via the lectin pathway.

Intelectin

Omentin
Intelectins are lectins (carbohydrate-binding proteins) expressed in humans and other chordates.

Oligosaccharide

oligosaccharidesoligo-complex carbohydrates
Lectins may be disabled by specific mono- and oligosaccharides, which bind to ingested lectins from grains, legumes, nightshade plants, and dairy; binding can prevent their attachment to the carbohydrates within the cell membrane.
Lectins, or proteins that bind carbohydrates, can recognize specific oligosaccharides and provide useful information for cell recognition based on oligosaccharide binding.

William C. Boyd

BoydBoyd, William ClouserWilliam Boyd
William C. Boyd introduced term 'lectin' in 1954 from the Latin word lect- 'chosen' (from the verb legere 'to choose').
Later, Boyd coined the term 'lectin'.

C-type lectin

C-type lectin domainC-lectinC-type
Some hepatitis C viral glycoproteins may attach to C-type lectins on the host cell surface (liver cells) to initiate infection.
A C-type lectin (CLEC) is a type of carbohydrate-binding protein domain known as a lectin.

Legume lectin

Lectin_legB
The function of lectins in plants (legume lectin) is still uncertain.
The legume lectins (or L-type lectins) are a family of sugar-binding proteins or lectins found in the seeds and, in smaller amounts, in the roots, stems, leaves and bark of plants of the family Fabaceae.

Galanthus nivalis

snowdropscommon snowdropG. nivalis
Snowdrops contain also an active lectin or agglutinin named GNA for Galanthus nivalis agglutinin.

BanLec

A lectin (BanLec) from bananas inhibits HIV-1 in vitro.
BanLec (also BanLec-I or Banana lectin) is a lectin from the jacalin-related lectin family isolated from the fruit of the bananas Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana.

Phytohaemagglutinin

phytohemagglutininPHAPHA-L
Lectins from legume plants, such as PHA or concanavalin A, have been used widely as model systems to understand the molecular basis of how proteins recognize carbohydrates, because they are relatively easy to obtain and have a wide variety of sugar specificities.
Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA, or phytohemagglutinin) is a lectin found in plants, especially certain legumes.

Glycoprotein

glycoproteinsmembrane glycoproteinprotein
They may bind to a soluble carbohydrate or to a carbohydrate moiety that is a part of a glycoprotein or glycolipid.

Hemagglutinin

haemagglutininhemagglutinins, viralphytohemaglutinins
To avoid clearance from the body by the innate immune system, pathogens (e.g., virus particles and bacteria that infect human cells) often express surface lectins known as adhesins and hemagglutinins that bind to tissue-specific glycans on host cell-surface glycoproteins and glycolipids.
Antibodies and lectins are commonly known hemagglutinins.

Ulex europaeus

gorsecommon gorseEuropean gorse
Lectin extracted from seeds of this species binds to, is remarkably specific for, and is the standard method for identification of H-substance (absent in the hh antigen system) on human red blood cells.

Glycolipid

glycolipidsglyceroglycolipid
They may bind to a soluble carbohydrate or to a carbohydrate moiety that is a part of a glycoprotein or glycolipid. To avoid clearance from the body by the innate immune system, pathogens (e.g., virus particles and bacteria that infect human cells) often express surface lectins known as adhesins and hemagglutinins that bind to tissue-specific glycans on host cell-surface glycoproteins and glycolipids.
The saccharide of the glycolipid will bind to a specific complementary carbohydrate or to a lectin (carbohydrate-binding protein), of a neighboring cell.

Soybean agglutinin

Its seeds contain high activity of soybean lectins (soybean agglutinin or SBA).
Soybean agglutinins (SBA) also known as soy bean lectins (SBL) are lectins found in soybeans.

Steven Gundry

Because some lectins can be harmful if poorly cooked or consumed in great quantities, "lectin-free" diets have been proposed, most based on the writing of Steven Gundry.
He is best known for his disputed claims that lectins, a type of plant protein found in numerous foods, cause inflammation resulting in many modern diseases.