Legal recognition of sign languages

recognisedsign language lawlegal recognitionlegally recognisedlegally recognizedofficially recognizedrecognising LSFrecognition of sign languagesrecognized Finnish Sign Languageregulated
The legal recognition of sign languages differs widely.wikipedia
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Sign language

sign languagesdeaf sign languagesigning
In some countries, the national sign language is an official state language, whereas in others it has a protected status in certain areas such as education.
Some sign languages have obtained some form of legal recognition, while others have no status at all.

Auslan

Australian Sign LanguageasfAustralasian Signed English
Auslan was recognised by the Australian Government as a "community language other than English" and the preferred language of the Deaf community in policy statements in 1987 and 1991.
Auslan was recognised by the Australian government as a "community language other than English" and the preferred language of the Deaf community in policy statements in 1987 and 1991.

Brazilian Sign Language

Brazilian Sign Language (LIBRAS)LIBRASBSL
The Brazilian Sign Language (LIBRAS) was legally recognized in 2002 but can't replace written Portuguese; the law was regulated in 2005.
A strong sign language law was passed by the National Congress of Brazil on April 24, 2002, and (in 2005) is in the process of being implemented.

Austrian Sign Language

Austro-Hungarian SignasqAustrian
Austrian Sign Language (Österreichische Gebärdensprache, ÖGS) was recognised by the Austrian Parliament in 2005.
After a 15-year effort by the Deaf community, ÖGS was legally recognized by the Austrian Parliament on September 1, 2005.

Deaf culture

deaf communitydeafdeaf communities
Extending legal recognition is one of the major concerns of the international Deaf community, however, symbolic recognition is no guarantee for an effective improvement of the life of sign language users, and it has been argued that sign languages should be recognized and supported not merely as an accommodation for the disabled, but as the communication medium of language communities.

Portuguese language

PortuguesePortuguese-languageBrazilian Portuguese
The Brazilian Sign Language (LIBRAS) was legally recognized in 2002 but can't replace written Portuguese; the law was regulated in 2005.

Regulation

regulationsregulatorygovernment regulation
The Brazilian Sign Language (LIBRAS) was legally recognized in 2002 but can't replace written Portuguese; the law was regulated in 2005.

School of education

College of Educationeducationschools of education
The language must be taught as a part of the education and speech and language pathology curricula, and law also mandates that LIBRAS be an elective subject as part of every other undergraduate course.

Speech-language pathology

speech therapyspeech pathologyspeech therapist
The language must be taught as a part of the education and speech and language pathology curricula, and law also mandates that LIBRAS be an elective subject as part of every other undergraduate course.

Inclusion (education)

inclusioninclusive educationinclusive
Schools and health services must provide access ("include") to deaf people.

Michael D. Higgins

Michael D HigginsMichael HigginsPresident Higgins
The "Recognition of Irish Sign Language for the Deaf Community Bill 2016" passed all stages in the Oireachtas (Irish Parliament) on 14 December 2017, and was signed into law by the President of Ireland Michael D Higgins on 24 December 2017.

Language interpretation

interpreterinterpretersinterpreting
Prior to 2017, there was no automatic right for deaf people to have an ISL interpreter (except for criminal court proceedings).

Public service

public servicesservicesGovernment service
For the deaf community, recognition of ISL means more legal rights and better access to public services - including education, healthcare, media and banking.

Education in the Republic of Ireland

Education in IrelandSpecial Needs Assistanteducation
For the deaf community, recognition of ISL means more legal rights and better access to public services - including education, healthcare, media and banking.

Healthcare in the Republic of Ireland

healthcareHealth care in the Republic of IrelandIrish health care system
For the deaf community, recognition of ISL means more legal rights and better access to public services - including education, healthcare, media and banking.

Media of the Republic of Ireland

mediaIrish national mediaMedia of Ireland
For the deaf community, recognition of ISL means more legal rights and better access to public services - including education, healthcare, media and banking.

Bank

Bankingbankerbanking system
For the deaf community, recognition of ISL means more legal rights and better access to public services - including education, healthcare, media and banking.

Language

languageslinguisticlinguistic diversity
Those who oppose LIS recognition say this language is "grammarless," although, by definition, a language cannot be, in fact, grammarless.

First language

mother tonguenative languagenative speaker
Although Nepali Sign Language has not yet been officially recognized as the mother tongue of Nepal's deaf population, legislation is underway which will bring Nepali law in line with the provisions of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Democrats 66

D66D'66Democraten 66
However, in September 2019 a bill of law initiative for official recognition of "Nederlandse Gebarentaal" was proposed by the parties D66, PvdA and CU.

Labour Party (Netherlands)

Labour PartyPvdADutch Labour Party
However, in September 2019 a bill of law initiative for official recognition of "Nederlandse Gebarentaal" was proposed by the parties D66, PvdA and CU.

Christian Union (Netherlands)

ChristianUnionChristian UnionCU
However, in September 2019 a bill of law initiative for official recognition of "Nederlandse Gebarentaal" was proposed by the parties D66, PvdA and CU.

Māori language

MāoriMaorite reo Māori
New Zealand Sign Language became the second official language of New Zealand in April 2006, joining Māori when the bill was passed in the New Zealand Parliament on April 6, 2006.