Legend

legendarylegendary historylegendslocal traditionalamatAlamat: Alamat ng Bayabasan explanationlegend narrativeslegendary heroeslegendary stories
Legend is a genre of folklore that consists of a narrative featuring human actions perceived or believed both by teller and listeners to have taken place within human history.wikipedia
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Narrative

storystoriesnarratives
Legend is a genre of folklore that consists of a narrative featuring human actions perceived or believed both by teller and listeners to have taken place within human history.
Narrative can be organized in a number of thematic or formal categories: non-fiction (such as definitively including creative non-fiction, biography, journalism, transcript poetry, and historiography); fictionalization of historical events (such as anecdote, myth, legend, and historical fiction); and fiction proper (such as literature in prose and sometimes poetry, such as short stories, novels, and narrative poems and songs, and imaginary narratives as portrayed in other textual forms, games, or live or recorded performances).

Miracle

miraclesmiraculousdivine intervention
Legend, for its active and passive participants, includes no happenings that are outside the realm of "possibility," but may include miracles.
Thus, Somawathie Stupa in Sri Lanka is an increasingly popular site of pilgrimage and tourist destination thanks to multiple reports about miraculous rays of light, apparitions and modern legends, which often have been fixed in photographs and movies.

Folklore

folk talefolktalefolk
Legend is a genre of folklore that consists of a narrative featuring human actions perceived or believed both by teller and listeners to have taken place within human history. The Brothers Grimm defined legend as folktale historically grounded.
Legends

Fairy tale

fairy talesfairy-talefairytale
In 1866, Jacob Grimm described the fairy tale as "poetic, legend historic."
Fairy tales may be distinguished from other folk narratives such as legends (which generally involve belief in the veracity of the events described) and explicit moral tales, including beast fables.

Irony

ironicironicallydramatic irony
The narrative content of legend is in realistic mode, rather than the wry irony of folktale; Wilhelm Heiske remarked on the similarity of motifs in legend and folktale and concluded that, in spite of its realistic mode, legend is not more historical than folktale.
Ancient Greek drama was especially characterized by tragic irony because the audiences were so familiar with the legends that most of the plays dramatized.

Urban legend

urban mythurban legendsurban myths
Gordon Allport credited the staying-power of some rumours to the persistent cultural state-of-mind that they embody and capsulise; thus "Urban legends" are a feature of rumour.
Brunvand used his collection of legends, The Vanishing Hitchhiker: American Urban Legends & Their Meanings (1981) to make two points: first, that legends and folklore do not occur exclusively in so-called primitive or traditional societies, and second, that one could learn much about urban and modern culture by studying such tales.

Myth

mythologymythologicalmyths
Hippolyte Delehaye distinguished legend from myth: "The legend, on the other hand, has, of necessity, some historical or topographical connection. It refers imaginary events to some real personage, or it localizes romantic stories in some definite spot."
However, while myth and other folklore genres may overlap, myth is often thought to differ from genres such as legend and folktale in that neither are considered to be sacred narratives.

Fable

fabulistfablesfolktales
Stories that exceed the boundaries of "realism" are called "fables".
The varying corpus denoted Aesopica or Aesop's Fables includes most of the best-known western fables, which are attributed to the legendary Aesop, supposed to have been a slave in ancient Greece around 550 BCE.

Hagiography

hagiographieshagiographichagiographer
In the narrow Christian sense, legenda ("things to be read [on a certain day, in church]") were hagiographical accounts, often collected in a legendary.
Hagiography constituted an important literary genre in the early Christian church, providing some informational history along with the more inspirational stories and legends.

Jacobus da Varagine

Jacobus de VoragineJacopo da VaragineJacopo da Varazze
Jacob de Voragine's Legenda Aurea or "The Golden Legend" comprises a series of vitae or instructive biographical narratives, tied to the liturgical calendar of the Roman Catholic Church.
The saints' lives are full of fanciful legend, and in not a few cases contain accounts of 13th century miracles wrought at special places, particularly with reference to the Dominicans.

Verisimilitude (fiction)

verisimilitudeverisimilarverisimilitudinous
Narratives in this genre may demonstrate human values, and possess certain qualities that give the tale verisimilitude.

Realism (arts)

Realismrealistrealistic
Stories that exceed the boundaries of "realism" are called "fables". Legends may be transformed over time, in order to keep them fresh, vital, and realistic.

Brothers Grimm

GrimmGrimm Brothersthe Brothers Grimm
The Brothers Grimm defined legend as folktale historically grounded.

Loanword

loanwordsloan wordborrowed
Legend is a loanword from Old French that entered English usage circa 1340.

Old French

Frenchmedieval FrenchOF
Legend is a loanword from Old French that entered English usage circa 1340.

Medieval Latin

LatinMedievalmediaeval Latin
The Old French noun legende derives from the Medieval Latin legenda.

Protestantism

ProtestantProtestantsEvangelical
By 1613, English-speaking Protestants began to use the word when they wished to imply that an event (especially the story of any saint not acknowledged in John Foxe's Actes and Monuments) was fictitious.

Saint

saintssainthoodAll Saints
By 1613, English-speaking Protestants began to use the word when they wished to imply that an event (especially the story of any saint not acknowledged in John Foxe's Actes and Monuments) was fictitious.

John Foxe

FoxeFoxMr. Fox
By 1613, English-speaking Protestants began to use the word when they wished to imply that an event (especially the story of any saint not acknowledged in John Foxe's Actes and Monuments) was fictitious.

Foxe's Book of Martyrs

Book of MartyrsActes and MonumentsActs and Monuments
By 1613, English-speaking Protestants began to use the word when they wished to imply that an event (especially the story of any saint not acknowledged in John Foxe's Actes and Monuments) was fictitious.

Spurious

Thus, legend gained its modern connotations of "undocumented" and "spurious", which distinguish it from the meaning of chronicle.

Chronicle

chroniclerchroniclersverse chronicle
Thus, legend gained its modern connotations of "undocumented" and "spurious", which distinguish it from the meaning of chronicle.

Jacob Grimm

JacobGrimmGrimm, Jacob
In 1866, Jacob Grimm described the fairy tale as "poetic, legend historic."

Friedrich Ranke

Early scholars such as Friedrich Ranke and Will Erich Peuckert followed Grimm's example in focussing solely on the literary narrative, an approach that was enriched particularly after the 1960s, by addressing questions of performance and the anthropological and psychological insights provided in considering legends' social context.

Will Erich Peuckert

Early scholars such as Friedrich Ranke and Will Erich Peuckert followed Grimm's example in focussing solely on the literary narrative, an approach that was enriched particularly after the 1960s, by addressing questions of performance and the anthropological and psychological insights provided in considering legends' social context.