Lemuel Shaw

Chief Justice ShawElizabeth "Lizzie" ShawJustice Lemuel ShawShawShaw CJ
Lemuel Shaw (January 9, 1781 – March 30, 1861) was an American jurist who served as Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (1830–1860).wikipedia
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Herman Melville

MelvilleMelville, Herman Herman Melville
In 1847 Shaw became the father-in-law of author Herman Melville.
Both were successful and they gave him the financial basis to marry Elizabeth "Lizzie" Shaw, a daughter of a prominent Boston family.

West Barnstable, Massachusetts

West BarnstableWest Barnstable, MAWhelden Memorial Library
Shaw was born in West Barnstable, Massachusetts, the second son of Oakes Shaw and his second wife Susanna, who was a daughter of John H. Hayward of Braintree.
Lemuel Shaw, another native of the village, held the important post of chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court from 1830 to 1860 and earned the reputation of a leading jurist in the nation's formative constitutional history.

Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court

Supreme Judicial Court of MassachusettsMassachusetts Supreme CourtSupreme Judicial Court
Lemuel Shaw (January 9, 1781 – March 30, 1861) was an American jurist who served as Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (1830–1860).

Antoine Jay

Jay
Meanwhile, he learned French proficiently from a refugee, Antoine Jay, afterwards a founder in France of the liberal newspaper Le Constitutionnel.
He travelled to Canada and the United States between 1795 and 1802 to escape the French Revolution, making friends with Thomas Jefferson and teaching French to Lemuel Shaw.

Commonwealth v. Aves

In 1836 his court ruled in Commonwealth v. Aves that a slave brought voluntarily into Massachusetts, a free state, was a "sojourner," or a journeyer, and not taking domicile in that state.
In August 1836, Chief Justice Lemuel Shaw ruled that slaves brought to Massachusetts "for any temporary purpose of business or pleasure" were entitled to freedom.

Levi Lincoln Jr.

Levi Lincoln, Jr.Levi LincolnLevi
On the death of Chief State Justice Isaac Parker, Governor Levi Lincoln offered Shaw the appointment.
Following the death of Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Isaac Parker, Lincoln offered the post to Lemuel Shaw, a lawyer with a solid reputation who had been at Harvard with him and had served with him in the legislature.

Commonwealth v. Hunt

Commonwealth v Hunt
In Commonwealth v. Hunt (1842), Shaw provided an important precedent in labor relations by arguing that members of labor unions were not engaging in criminal conspiracies against their employers.
In March 1842, Chief Justice Lemuel Shaw ruled that labor combinations were legal provided that they were organized for a legal purpose and used legal means to achieve their goals.

Commonwealth v. Alger

His decision in Commonwealth v. Alger (1851) was an early and influential attempt to define the limits of state police power.
The majority opinion was written by Justice Lemuel Shaw.

Washington Goode

Shaw presided over several cases that would help shape American law and jurisprudence including the case of Washington Goode, a black seaman convicted on circumstantial evidence of murdering a fellow black mariner in 1849 Boston.
His trial was presided over by Justice Lemuel Shaw who the following year would sentence Professor John White Webster to death for the murder of Harvard Medical School benefactor, George Parkman, another trial that would capture Boston's imagination and blur the lines of distinction between opponents and advocates of capital punishment.

Parkman–Webster murder case

Parkman-Webster murder casea highly publicized caseCommonwealth v. Webster
Other cases that were socially notable were the 1847 divorce case of Henry Cobb against his wife Augusta Adams Cobb, for joining the Mormons and eventually marrying Brigham Young in a polygamous marriage (Cobb v. Cobb); and that in 1850 of Professor John White Webster for murdering George Parkman (Commonwealth v. Webster).
The trial began on March 19, 1850, with Chief Justice Lemuel Shaw (Harvard class of 1800) of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court presiding.

Roberts v. City of Boston

Roberts v. BostonSarah Roberts v. BostonBenjamin F. Roberts
His ruling in favor of the constitutionality of school segregation in Roberts v. City of Boston (1849) established "separate but equal" as a legal doctrine in the state.
The defendant's attorney was Peleg Chandler, the plaintiff's attorneys were Charles Sumner and Robert Morris (one of the country's first African-American lawyers), and the judge was Lemuel Shaw.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Lemuel Shaw (January 9, 1781 – March 30, 1861) was an American jurist who served as Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (1830–1860).

Braintree, Massachusetts

BraintreeSouth Braintree, MassachusettsSouth Braintree
Shaw was born in West Barnstable, Massachusetts, the second son of Oakes Shaw and his second wife Susanna, who was a daughter of John H. Hayward of Braintree.

Halifax, West Yorkshire

HalifaxHalifax, YorkshireHalifax, England
The Shaws were descendants of Abraham Shaw (January 2, 1590 – November 2, 1638), who left Halifax, England in 1636 and settled in Dedham.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
The Shaws were descendants of Abraham Shaw (January 2, 1590 – November 2, 1638), who left Halifax, England in 1636 and settled in Dedham.

Dedham, Massachusetts

DedhamDedham, MATown of Dedham
The Shaws were descendants of Abraham Shaw (January 2, 1590 – November 2, 1638), who left Halifax, England in 1636 and settled in Dedham.

Congregational church

CongregationalCongregationalistCongregationalists
Oakes Shaw, a Congregationalist minister, was pastor of the West Church in Barnstable for forty-seven years.

Harvard College

HarvardHarvard Universityhouses
Educated at home by his father except for a few months at Braintree, he entered Harvard in 1796.

Boston Gazette

Boston ''GazetteThe Boston Gazette and Country Journal
After graduating with high honors in 1800, he taught for a year in a Boston public school, and wrote articles and read proof for the Boston Gazette, a Federalist newspaper.

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
Meanwhile, he learned French proficiently from a refugee, Antoine Jay, afterwards a founder in France of the liberal newspaper Le Constitutionnel.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
Meanwhile, he learned French proficiently from a refugee, Antoine Jay, afterwards a founder in France of the liberal newspaper Le Constitutionnel.

Le Constitutionnel

Constitutionnel
Meanwhile, he learned French proficiently from a refugee, Antoine Jay, afterwards a founder in France of the liberal newspaper Le Constitutionnel.

Amherst, New Hampshire

AmherstAmherst, NHNashua, New Hampshire
In 1802, he moved with Everett to Amherst, New Hampshire, where besides doing legal work he contributed a poem on dancing and translations from French to the Farmers' Cabinet, a local newspaper.

Thomas Melvill (American patriot)

Thomas MelvillThomas Melville
He became engaged to Nancy Melvill, daughter of Maj. Thomas Melvill of Boston (the subject of Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr.'s poem "The Last Leaf") but she died soon afterward.

Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

Hillsborough CountyHillsboroughManchester-Nashua, NH Metropolitan Statistical Area
Admitted to the bar in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, in September 1804, and in Plymouth County, Massachusetts that November, Shaw began practice in Boston.