Leo Sternbach

Leo H. SternbachLeo Henryk Sternbach
Leo Sternbach (May 7, 1908 – September 28, 2005) was an American chemist who is credited with first synthesizing benzodiazepines, the main class of tranquilizers.wikipedia
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Jagiellonian University

University of KrakówKraków AcademyUniversity of Krakow
He received his master's degree in pharmacy in 1929 and his doctoral degree in organic chemistry in 1931 from the Jagiellonian University in Krakow.

Moses Wolf Goldberg

With Moses Wolf Goldberg, Sternbach also developed "the first commercially applicable" method for synthesizing biotin.
Dr Moses Wolf Goldberg (June 30, 1905 – February 17, 1964) was an Estonian-Jewish chemist who, along with Leo Henryk Sternbach, developed a process for the synthesis of biotin (a B vitamin) in 1949.

Benzodiazepine

benzodiazepinesbenzodiazapinesbenzo
Leo Sternbach (May 7, 1908 – September 28, 2005) was an American chemist who is credited with first synthesizing benzodiazepines, the main class of tranquilizers.
The first such drug, chlordiazepoxide (Librium), was discovered accidentally by Leo Sternbach in 1955, and made available in 1960 by Hoffmann–La Roche, which, since 1963, has also marketed the benzodiazepine diazepam (Valium).

New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame

New Jersey Inventor's Hall of Fame
He is present in the New Jersey Inventor's Hall of Fame; and was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in February 2005, a few months before his death.

Flunitrazepam

Rohypnolroofiesroofie
He is credited with the discovery of chlordiazepoxide (Librium), diazepam (Valium), flurazepam (Dalmane), nitrazepam (Mogadon), flunitrazepam (Rohypnol), clonazepam (Klonopin), and trimethaphan (Arfonad).
Flunitrazepam was discovered at Roche as part of the benzodiazepine work led by Leo Sternbach; the patent application was filed in 1962 and it was first marketed in 1974.

Diazepam

ValiumDizacCANA
He is credited with the discovery of chlordiazepoxide (Librium), diazepam (Valium), flurazepam (Dalmane), nitrazepam (Mogadon), flunitrazepam (Rohypnol), clonazepam (Klonopin), and trimethaphan (Arfonad).
Diazepam was the second benzodiazepine invented by Leo Sternbach of Hoffmann-La Roche at the company's Nutley, New Jersey, facility following chlordiazepoxide (Librium), which was approved for use in 1960.

Gustav Sorge

His killer was Gustav Sorge.
Among the many people who were murdered at Sachsenhausen by Sorge was Leon Sternbach, a professor of classical philology at the Jagiellonian University and the paternal uncle of famed chemist, Leo Sternbach.

Upper Montclair, New Jersey

Upper MontclairUpper Montclair Business DistrictMontclair
Sternbach was a longtime resident of Upper Montclair, New Jersey, from 1943 to 2003.

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Chapel HillChapel Hill, NCChapel Hill, N.C.
He then moved to Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where he died in 2005.

Chemistry

chemistchemicalApplied Chemistry
Leo Sternbach (May 7, 1908 – September 28, 2005) was an American chemist who is credited with first synthesizing benzodiazepines, the main class of tranquilizers.

Tranquilizer

tranquilizerstranquillisertranquiliser
Leo Sternbach (May 7, 1908 – September 28, 2005) was an American chemist who is credited with first synthesizing benzodiazepines, the main class of tranquilizers.

Opatija

AbbaziaOpatija, CroatiaAbbázia
Sternbach was born on May 7, 1908, in Opatija, to an upper middle class Jewish family.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
Sternbach was born on May 7, 1908, in Opatija, to an upper middle class Jewish family.

Przemyśl

PrzemyslPeremyshlPeremyshl`
His father Michael Abracham Sternbach was from Polish city of Przemyśl in Galicia (then part of Austria-Hungary), and his mother Piroska (née Cohn) Sternbach was from Orosháza, Hungary.

Galicia (Eastern Europe)

GaliciaGalicianHalychyna
His father Michael Abracham Sternbach was from Polish city of Przemyśl in Galicia (then part of Austria-Hungary), and his mother Piroska (née Cohn) Sternbach was from Orosháza, Hungary.

Maiden and married names

néemaiden namemarried name
His father Michael Abracham Sternbach was from Polish city of Przemyśl in Galicia (then part of Austria-Hungary), and his mother Piroska (née Cohn) Sternbach was from Orosháza, Hungary.

Orosháza

His father Michael Abracham Sternbach was from Polish city of Przemyśl in Galicia (then part of Austria-Hungary), and his mother Piroska (née Cohn) Sternbach was from Orosháza, Hungary.

Hungary

HungarianHUNRepublic of Hungary
His father Michael Abracham Sternbach was from Polish city of Przemyśl in Galicia (then part of Austria-Hungary), and his mother Piroska (née Cohn) Sternbach was from Orosháza, Hungary.

Villach

Villach, AustriaLandskronSanctium
Sternbach attended a private German school in Opatija until it was closed in 1920, and—since he could not speak Italian—continued his schooling in Villach, Graz, and Bielitz.

Graz

Graz, AustriaGratzGratz, Austria
Sternbach attended a private German school in Opatija until it was closed in 1920, and—since he could not speak Italian—continued his schooling in Villach, Graz, and Bielitz.

Bielsko

BielitzBielsko (Bielitz)
Sternbach attended a private German school in Opatija until it was closed in 1920, and—since he could not speak Italian—continued his schooling in Villach, Graz, and Bielitz.

Kraków

KrakowCracowKraków, Poland
In 1926, Sternbach moved with his family to Krakow, Poland.

Scarlet fever

scarlatinascarletinascarlatiniform rash
In the same year, his younger brother died of scarlet fever, at the age of fifteen.

Vienna

Vienna, AustriaWienViennese
In Vienna he worked with Wolfgang Joseph Pauli (Sr.) and Sigmund Fränkel; after which he worked with Leopold Ružička at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich.

Sigmund Fraenkel

Sigmund Fränkel
In Vienna he worked with Wolfgang Joseph Pauli (Sr.) and Sigmund Fränkel; after which he worked with Leopold Ružička at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich.