Leonid Gaidai

Leonid GaydayGaydayLeonid Gaiday
Leonid Iovich Gaidai (Леонид Иович Гайдай; 30 January 1923, Svobodny, Amur Oblast – 19 November 1993, Moscow) was a Soviet and Russian comedy film director who enjoyed immense popularity and broad public recognition in the former Soviet Union.wikipedia
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Nina Grebeshkova

He married the actress Nina Grebeshkova, who played minor roles in his future films. In the 1970s, Gaidai worked primarily with the comedians from his own studio group, which included Vitsin, Leonid Kuravlyov, Mikhail Pugovkin, Savely Kramarov, Natalya Seleznyova, Natalya Krachkovskaya, and his wife Nina Grebeshkova.
She was married to film director Leonid Gaidai.

A Groom from the Other World

His 1958 comedy The Dead Affair was described by Minister of Culture Nikolai Mikhailov as "a lampooning of Soviet Reality" and was cut to 47 minutes by censors as a result, and released as A Groom from the Other World.
A Groom from the Other World or is a 1958 Soviet comedy film directed by Leonid Gaidai.

Georgy Vitsin

Georgiy VitsinGeorgi VitsinGeorgy Vitsyn
In this film, Gaidai first introduced a comic trio of crooks – Georgy Vitsin, Yuri Nikulin, and Yevgeny Morgunov (aka 'ViNiMor', playing the characters Balbes, Byvaliy, and Trus), who later appeared in several of his other films.
He gained nationwide popularity in the former Soviet Union with the emergence of a series of 1960s comedies by director Leonid Gaidai.

The Diamond Arm

Brilliantovaya ruka
Following his break with Morgunov, Gaidai disbanded the trio, while casting Nikulin in what was to become the most popular Soviet comedy ever made, The Diamond Arm (1968).
The film was directed by director Leonid Gaidai and starred several famous Soviet actors, including Yuri Nikulin, Andrei Mironov, Anatoli Papanov, Nonna Mordyukova and Svetlana Svetlichnaya.

Gerasimov Institute of Cinematography

VGIKAll-Union State Institute of CinematographyState Institute of Cinematography
He subsequently attended the Moscow Institute of Cinematography, completing his studies in 1955.

Yuri Nikulin

NikulinPeople's Artist of the USSR Yuri Vladimirovich NikulinActor and clown, "People's Artist of the USSR" and "Hero of Socialist Labour" Yuri Vladimirovich Nikulin
In this film, Gaidai first introduced a comic trio of crooks – Georgy Vitsin, Yuri Nikulin, and Yevgeny Morgunov (aka 'ViNiMor', playing the characters Balbes, Byvaliy, and Trus), who later appeared in several of his other films. Following his break with Morgunov, Gaidai disbanded the trio, while casting Nikulin in what was to become the most popular Soviet comedy ever made, The Diamond Arm (1968).
He appeared in almost a dozen major features, mainly in the 1960s and 1970s, "but his ascent to star status was assured by a handful of short films directed by Leonid Gaidai."

Kidnapping, Caucasian Style

1967 film of the same nameKidnapping Caucassian StylePrisoner of the Caucasus, or Shurik's New Adventures
During these years, he filmed new adventures of the mischievous trio in The Bootleggers (1961), a film adaptation of O. Henry's short stories, Strictly Business (1962), Operation Y and Other Shurik's Adventures (1965), and Kidnapping, Caucasian Style (1966).
The film was directed by Leonid Gaidai.

Yevgeny Morgunov

Evgeniy MorgunovYevgeni MorgunovEvgeny Morgunov
In this film, Gaidai first introduced a comic trio of crooks – Georgy Vitsin, Yuri Nikulin, and Yevgeny Morgunov (aka 'ViNiMor', playing the characters Balbes, Byvaliy, and Trus), who later appeared in several of his other films. Following his break with Morgunov, Gaidai disbanded the trio, while casting Nikulin in what was to become the most popular Soviet comedy ever made, The Diamond Arm (1968).
Although his acting career was not limited to comedies, he was best known for his work in a comic trio in a series of films by Leonid Gaidai, with Yuri Nikulin as Fool (Balbes), and Georgy Vitsin as Coward (Trus).

Bootleggers (1961 film)

BootleggersBootleggers'' (1961 film)
During these years, he filmed new adventures of the mischievous trio in The Bootleggers (1961), a film adaptation of O. Henry's short stories, Strictly Business (1962), Operation Y and Other Shurik's Adventures (1965), and Kidnapping, Caucasian Style (1966).
Bootleggers or Moonshiners is a 1961 Soviet short comedy film directed by Leonid Gaidai.

Natalya Seleznyova

Natalia Selezneva
In the 1970s, Gaidai worked primarily with the comedians from his own studio group, which included Vitsin, Leonid Kuravlyov, Mikhail Pugovkin, Savely Kramarov, Natalya Seleznyova, Natalya Krachkovskaya, and his wife Nina Grebeshkova.
Her notable cinema work includes roles in films directed by Leonid Gaidai, like Operation Y and Shurik's Other Adventures and Ivan Vasilievich: Back to the Future.

It Can't Be!

All this cast was featured in his film adaptation of Mikhail Zoshchenko's short stories, It Can't Be! (1975).
«It Can't Be!» is a 1975 Soviet comedy film directed by Leonid Gaidai.

Ivan Vasilievich: Back to the Future

Ivan VasilyevichIvan Vasilievich Changes His ProfessionIvan Vasilievich Changes Profession
He also filmed a play by Mikhail Bulgakov, Ivan Vasilievich: Back to the Future (1973), Ilf and Petrov's The Twelve Chairs (1971), Nikolai Gogol's Incognito from St. Petersburg (1977), and Borrowing Matchsticks (1980), a story by the Finnish author Maiju Lassila.
Ivan Vasilievich Changes Profession is a Soviet comic science fiction film directed by Leonid Gaidai in 1973.

The Twelve Chairs (1971 film)

The Twelve Chairs1971a film in 1971
He also filmed a play by Mikhail Bulgakov, Ivan Vasilievich: Back to the Future (1973), Ilf and Petrov's The Twelve Chairs (1971), Nikolai Gogol's Incognito from St. Petersburg (1977), and Borrowing Matchsticks (1980), a story by the Finnish author Maiju Lassila.
The Twelve Chairs (12 стульев) is a 1971 Soviet comedy film directed by Leonid Gaidai.

Mikhail Pugovkin

Comic actor Mikhail Ivanovich Pugovkin
In the 1970s, Gaidai worked primarily with the comedians from his own studio group, which included Vitsin, Leonid Kuravlyov, Mikhail Pugovkin, Savely Kramarov, Natalya Seleznyova, Natalya Krachkovskaya, and his wife Nina Grebeshkova.
His roles in Leonid Gaidai's comedies, such as Operation Y and Other Shurik's Adventures (1965), Twelve Chairs (1971), Ivan Vasilievich: Back to the Future (1973) and Borrowing Matchsticks (1980) made him one of the most popular comedians of the former Soviet Union.

Svobodny, Amur Oblast

SvobodnySvobodnenskySvobodny in Amur Oblast
Leonid Iovich Gaidai (Леонид Иович Гайдай; 30 January 1923, Svobodny, Amur Oblast – 19 November 1993, Moscow) was a Soviet and Russian comedy film director who enjoyed immense popularity and broad public recognition in the former Soviet Union.
The town is the birthplace of the movie director Leonid Gaidai, whose memorial was unveiled in September 2006.

Incognito from St. Petersburg

He also filmed a play by Mikhail Bulgakov, Ivan Vasilievich: Back to the Future (1973), Ilf and Petrov's The Twelve Chairs (1971), Nikolai Gogol's Incognito from St. Petersburg (1977), and Borrowing Matchsticks (1980), a story by the Finnish author Maiju Lassila.
Incognito from St. Petersburg is a 1977 Soviet comedy film directed by Leonid Gaidai.

Leonid Kuravlyov

Leonid Kuravlev
In the 1970s, Gaidai worked primarily with the comedians from his own studio group, which included Vitsin, Leonid Kuravlyov, Mikhail Pugovkin, Savely Kramarov, Natalya Seleznyova, Natalya Krachkovskaya, and his wife Nina Grebeshkova.
Even though Kuravlyov was adept at playing serious dramatic roles, he is still best known for his leading roles in top-grossing comedy movies such as Afonya (1975) by Georgiy Daneliya (15th highest-grossing Soviet film with 62.2 mln viewers), Leonid Gaidai's Ivan Vasilievich: Back to the Future (1973, 17th highest-grossing film with 60.7 mln viewers) and It Can't Be! (1975, 46th highest-grossing film with 46.9 mln viewers), The Most Charming and Attractive (1985) by Gerald Bezhanov (56th highest-grossing film with 44.9 mln viewers) and others.

Ilf and Petrov

andIlya Ilf and Yevgeny PetrovElie Ilf
He also filmed a play by Mikhail Bulgakov, Ivan Vasilievich: Back to the Future (1973), Ilf and Petrov's The Twelve Chairs (1971), Nikolai Gogol's Incognito from St. Petersburg (1977), and Borrowing Matchsticks (1980), a story by the Finnish author Maiju Lassila.
The Twelve Chairs was adapted for ca. twenty movies, in the USSR (by Leonid Gaidai and by Mark Zakharov), in the US (in particular by Mel Brooks), and in other countries.

Thrice Resurrected

Thrice Resurrected is a 1960 Soviet drama film directed by Leonid Gaidai.

Operation Y and Shurik's Other Adventures

Operation Y and Other Shurik's AdventuresOperation YOperation Y and Other Adventures of Shurik
During these years, he filmed new adventures of the mischievous trio in The Bootleggers (1961), a film adaptation of O. Henry's short stories, Strictly Business (1962), Operation Y and Other Shurik's Adventures (1965), and Kidnapping, Caucasian Style (1966).
Operation Y and Shurik's Other Adventures - (Operatsiya „Y“ i drugie priklyucheniya Shurika) is a 1965 Soviet slapstick comedy film directed by Leonid Gaidai, starring Aleksandr Demyanenko, Natalya Seleznyova, Yuri Nikulin, Georgy Vitsin and Yevgeny Morgunov.

A Weary Road

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A Weary Road is a 1956 Soviet drama film directed by Leonid Gaidai and Valentin Nevzorov.

Strictly Business (1962 film)

Strictly BusinessStrictly Business'' (1962 film)
Strictly Business (alternate name Business People, Деловые люди) is a 1962 Soviet black-and-white comedy film directed by Leonid Gaidai, based on three short stories by O. Henry: "The Roads We Take", "Makes the Whole World Kin", and "The Ransom of Red Chief".

Dog Barbos and Unusual Cross

Gaidai's international recognition included a nomination for best short film at the 1961 Cannes Film Festival for Dog Barbos and Unusual Cross.
Dog Barbos and Unusual Cross or is a 1961 Soviet short comedy film directed by Leonid Gaidai.

Sportloto-82

Sportloto-82 (Спортлото-82) is a comedy film, directed by Leonid Gaidai and released in 1982.