Leontyne Price

Leontine PricePrice
Mary Violet Leontyne Price (born February 10, 1927) is an American soprano.wikipedia
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List of recipients of the National Medal of Arts

National Medal of ArtsNational Medal of the ArtsPresidential Medal for the Arts
Among her many honors are the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1964), the Spingarn Medal (1965), the Kennedy Center Honors (1980), the National Medal of Arts (1985), numerous honorary degrees, and 19 Grammy Awards for operatic and song recitals and full operas, and a special Lifetime Achievement Award in 1989, more than any other classical singer.

Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award

Lifetime Achievement AwardLifetime AchievementLifetime Achievement Grammy
Among her many honors are the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1964), the Spingarn Medal (1965), the Kennedy Center Honors (1980), the National Medal of Arts (1985), numerous honorary degrees, and 19 Grammy Awards for operatic and song recitals and full operas, and a special Lifetime Achievement Award in 1989, more than any other classical singer.

Kennedy Center Honors

Kennedy Center HonorThe Kennedy Center HonorsThe Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts
Among her many honors are the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1964), the Spingarn Medal (1965), the Kennedy Center Honors (1980), the National Medal of Arts (1985), numerous honorary degrees, and 19 Grammy Awards for operatic and song recitals and full operas, and a special Lifetime Achievement Award in 1989, more than any other classical singer.

Metropolitan Opera

New York Metropolitan OperaMetropolitan Opera OrchestraThe Metropolitan Opera
Born and raised in Laurel, Mississippi, she rose to international acclaim in the 1950s and 1960s, and was the first African American to become a leading performer, or prima donna, at the Metropolitan Opera, and one of the most popular American classical singers of her generation.
Marian Anderson's historic 1955 debut was followed by the introduction of a gifted generation of African American artists led by Leontyne Price (who inaugurated the new house at Lincoln Center), Reri Grist, Grace Bumbry, Shirley Verrett, Martina Arroyo, George Shirley, Robert McFerrin, and many others.

Porgy and Bess

Porgy & BessThe Gershwins' Porgy and BessI Got Plenty o' Nuttin
Meanwhile, she had auditioned and been cast as Bess in the third major production of George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess, directed by Robert Breen, who had also hear her in Falstaff. Bereft returned from France, she sang the opening night of Porgy at the State Fair of Texas on June 9, 1952 to rave reviews.
This production's original cast featured Americans Leontyne Price as Bess, William Warfield as Porgy, and Cab Calloway as Sportin' Life, a role that Gershwin had composed with him in mind.

William Warfield

On the eve of the European tour, Price married her Porgy, the noted concert singer, bass-baritone William Warfield, at the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem, with many of the cast in attendance.
He went on to produce a highly acclaimed album of selections from Porgy and Bess with Leontyne Price in 1963.

David Garvey

Garvey
(She would make her European debut under his baton in 1958.) Over the next three seasons, Price crossed the U.S. in recitals with her longtime accompanist, David Garvey.
He is known as the regular accompanist of Leontyne Price and other performers, including violinists Itzhak Perlman, Michael Rabin and Wanda Wiłkomirska.

Spingarn Medal

Spingarn AwardNAACP Spingarn Medal
Among her many honors are the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1964), the Spingarn Medal (1965), the Kennedy Center Honors (1980), the National Medal of Arts (1985), numerous honorary degrees, and 19 Grammy Awards for operatic and song recitals and full operas, and a special Lifetime Achievement Award in 1989, more than any other classical singer.

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaPittsburgh, PACity of Pittsburgh
The Breen-Davis production toured Chicago, Pittsburgh, and Washington, D.C., and then Europe (Vienna, Berlin, London and Paris), under the sponsorship of the U.S. State Department.
This led to the prominence of African-American singers like Leontyne Price in the world of opera.

John La Montaine

John LaMontaine
She also premiered new works by Lou Harrison and John La Montaine.
His works have been performed by Leontyne Price, Jessye Norman, Adele Addison, Donald Graham, Eleanor Steber and Jorge Bolet.

Dialogues of the Carmelites

Dialogues des CarmélitesDialogues des CarmelitesLe Dialogue des carmélites
Price sang in three later NBC Opera broadcasts, as Pamina in The Magic Flute (1956), Madame Lidoine in Poulenc's Dialogues of the Carmelites (1957), and Donna Anna in Don Giovanni (1960).
The United States premiere took place three months later, on 20 September, in English, at San Francisco Opera; this featured the opera stage debut of Leontyne Price (as Madame Lidoine).

Mississippi

MSState of MississippiGeography of Mississippi
Born and raised in Laurel, Mississippi, she rose to international acclaim in the 1950s and 1960s, and was the first African American to become a leading performer, or prima donna, at the Metropolitan Opera, and one of the most popular American classical singers of her generation.
From opera star Leontyne Price to the alternative rock band 3 Doors Down, to gulf and western singer Jimmy Buffett, modern rock/jazz/world music guitarist-producer Clifton Hyde, to rappers David Banner, Big K.R.I.T. and Afroman, Mississippi musicians have been significant in all genres.

Marian Anderson

Marion AndersonMarian Anderson AwardMarian Anderson Singing Competition
At 14, she was taken on a school trip to hear Marian Anderson sing in Jackson, an experience she later said was inspirational.
She was an example and an inspiration to both Leontyne Price and Jessye Norman.

Dionne Warwick

DionneDionne WarrickDionne Warwicke
In her 2011 autobiography, My Life, as I See It, Dionne Warwick notes that Price is her maternal cousin.

Antony and Cleopatra (opera)

Antony and CleopatraAntonio e CleopatraAntony and Cleopatra'' (opera)
Over the next five seasons, Price added seven more roles at the Met: (in chronological order) Elvira in Verdi's Ernani, Pamina in Mozart's The Magic Flute, Fiordiligi in Mozart's Così fan tutte, Tatyana in Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin, Cleopatra in Barber's Antony and Cleopatra, Amelia in Un ballo in maschera, and Leonora in La forza del destino.
The team included revolutionary choreographer Alvin Ailey, conductor Thomas Schippers and a top rate cast headed by Leontyne Price as Cleopatra.

Joan Sutherland

Dame Joan SutherlandSutherlandJoan Alston Sutherland
In 1964, according to the Met archives, Leontyne Price received $2,750 per performance, on a par with Joan Sutherland, Maria Callas and Renata Tebaldi.
On my personal color scale, which runs from a voluptuous red (Tebaldi) or blood-orange (Leontyne Price) or purple (Caballé) or red-purple (Troyanos) to white-hot (Rysanek) or runny yellow-green (Sills), Sutherland is among the "blue" sopranos – which has nothing to do with "blues" in the pop sense of the term.

Mattiwilda Dobbs

(In 1958, Mattiwilda Dobbs had sung Elvira, the secondary soprano role in Rossini's L'italiana in Algeri.)
Her successful, high-profile European career is considered significant in setting an example to younger black female singers such as Leontyne Price, Shirley Verrett, Jessye Norman and Kathleen Battle.

Hermit Songs

Hermit Songs'', Op. 29
Amid performances of Porgy, she sang the premiere of Hermit Songs, a song cycle by Samuel Barber, at the Library of Congress.
The Hermit Songs received their premiere in 1953 at the Library of Congress, with soprano Leontyne Price and Barber himself as pianist.

Anita Cerquetti

Cerquetti
After her European debut, as Aida, at the Vienna Staatsoper on May 24, 1958, she made noted debuts at London's Royal Opera House (replacing Anita Cerquetti), and at the Arena di Verona, both as Aida.
She was replaced by Leontyne Price.

Take My Hand, Precious Lord

Precious Lord, Take My HandPrecious LordPrecious Lord (Part 1)
In January 1973, she sang "Precious Lord, Take My Hand" and "Onward, Christian Soldiers" at the state funeral of President Lyndon B. Johnson, at whose 1965 inauguration she had sung.
Opera singer Leontyne Price sang it at the state funeral of President Lyndon B. Johnson in January 1973, and Aretha Franklin sang it at Mahalia Jackson's funeral in 1972.

Samuel Barber

BarberBarber, Samuel Barber
The next milestone in her career was September 16, 1966, when she sang Cleopatra in Antony and Cleopatra by American composer Samuel Barber, a new opera commissioned to open the Met's new house at Lincoln Center.
Many of his compositions were commissioned or first performed by such noted artists as Vladimir Horowitz, Eleanor Steber, Raya Garbousova, John Browning, Leontyne Price, Pierre Bernac, Francis Poulenc, and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau.

Aida (musical)

AidaAida'' (musical)Aïda
In 1997, at the suggestion of RCA Victor, she wrote a children's book version of Aida, which became the basis for the hit Broadway musical by Elton John and Tim Rice in 2000.
The musical originated from a children's storybook version of Verdi's opera written by the soprano Leontyne Price.

A Salute to American Music

A Salute to American Music'' (Richard Tucker Music Foundation Gala XVI, 1991)A Salute to American Music (Richard Tucker Music Foundation Gala XVI, 1991)A Salute to American Music'' (Richard Tucker Music Foundation Gala XVI), RCA Victor Red Seal, 1992.
* A Salute to American Music (Richard Tucker Music Foundation Gala XVI, 1991)
A Salute to American Music is a 113-minute live album of music, both classical and popular, performed by Steven Blier, Renée Fleming, Paul Groves, Jerry Hadley, Karen Holvik, Marilyn Horne, Jeff Mattsey, Robert Merrill, Sherrill Milnes, Maureen O'Flynn, Phyllis Pancella, Leontyne Price, Samuel Ramey, Daniel Smith, Frederica von Stade, Tatiana Troyanos, Carol Vaness and Denise Woods with the Collegiate Chorale and members of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra under the direction of James Conlon.

Jessye Norman

The sopranos Renée Fleming, Kiri Te Kanawa, Jessye Norman, Leona Mitchell, Barbara Bonney, Sondra Radvanovsky, the mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves, bass-baritone José van Dam, and the countertenor David Daniels, have talked about Price as an early inspiration.
She started listening to recordings of Marian Anderson and Leontyne Price, both of whom Norman credited as inspiring figures in her career.

Ernani

ElviraErnani InvolamiErnani, involami
Over the next five seasons, Price added seven more roles at the Met: (in chronological order) Elvira in Verdi's Ernani, Pamina in Mozart's The Magic Flute, Fiordiligi in Mozart's Così fan tutte, Tatyana in Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin, Cleopatra in Barber's Antony and Cleopatra, Amelia in Un ballo in maschera, and Leonora in La forza del destino.