Leopold and Loeb

Richard LoebBobby FranksNathan LeopoldNathan Leopold and Richard LoebRichard Loeb and Nathan Leopold, Jr.Nathan F. Leopold and Richard LoebNathan Freudenthal Leopold, Jr.Nathan Leopold Jr.Richard A. Loeb1920s murder case
Nathan Freudenthal Leopold Jr. (November 19, 1904 – August 29, 1971) and Richard Albert Loeb (June 11, 1905 – January 28, 1936), usually referred to collectively as Leopold and Loeb, were two wealthy students at the University of Chicago who in May 1924 kidnapped and murdered 14-year-old Bobby Franks in Chicago.wikipedia
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Clarence Darrow

DarrowClarence and Ruby DarrowClarence Seward Darrow
After the two men were arrested, Loeb's family retained Clarence Darrow as lead counsel for their defense.
Clarence Seward Darrow (April 18, 1857 – March 13, 1938) was an American lawyer who became famous in the early 20th century for his involvement in the Leopold and Loeb murder trial and the Scopes "Monkey" Trial.

Swoon (film)

SwoonSwoon'' (film)
Later works, such as Compulsion (1959), adapted from Meyer Levin's 1957 novel; Swoon (1992); and Murder by Numbers (2002) were also based on the crime. Other works influenced by the case include Richard Wright's 1940 novel Native Son, the Canadian Television show Murdoch Mysteries, Tom Kalin's 1992 film Swoon, Michael Haneke's 1997 Austrian film Funny Games and the 2008 International remake, the 2002 black comedy R.S.V.P., Barbet Schroeder's Murder by Numbers (2002), Daniel Clowes's 2005 graphic novel Ice Haven, and Stephen Dolginoff's 2005 Off-Broadway musical Thrill Me: The Leopold and Loeb Story.
It is an account of the 1924 Leopold and Loeb murder case, focusing more on the homosexuality of the killers than other films based on the case.

Compulsion (1959 film)

Compulsion1959 film1959 screen adaptation
Later works, such as Compulsion (1959), adapted from Meyer Levin's 1957 novel; Swoon (1992); and Murder by Numbers (2002) were also based on the crime.
The film is based on the 1956 novel of the same name by Meyer Levin, which in turn was a fictionalized account of the Leopold and Loeb murder trial.

Rope (play)

RopeRope's End1929 play of the same name
The Franks murder has been the inspiration for several dramatic works, including Patrick Hamilton's 1929 play Rope and Alfred Hitchcock's 1948 film of the same name.
The story, thought to be based loosely on the Leopold and Loeb murder case in 1924, concerns two young university students, Wyndham Brandon and Charles Granillo (whom Brandon calls "Granno"), who have murdered fellow student Ronald Kentley as an expression of their supposed intellectual superiority.

Rope (film)

Ropefilm of the same namemovie
The Franks murder has been the inspiration for several dramatic works, including Patrick Hamilton's 1929 play Rope and Alfred Hitchcock's 1948 film of the same name.
The original play was said to be inspired by the real-life murder of 14-year-old Bobby Franks in 1924 by University of Chicago students Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb.

Murder by Numbers

Later works, such as Compulsion (1959), adapted from Meyer Levin's 1957 novel; Swoon (1992); and Murder by Numbers (2002) were also based on the crime. Other works influenced by the case include Richard Wright's 1940 novel Native Son, the Canadian Television show Murdoch Mysteries, Tom Kalin's 1992 film Swoon, Michael Haneke's 1997 Austrian film Funny Games and the 2008 International remake, the 2002 black comedy R.S.V.P., Barbet Schroeder's Murder by Numbers (2002), Daniel Clowes's 2005 graphic novel Ice Haven, and Stephen Dolginoff's 2005 Off-Broadway musical Thrill Me: The Leopold and Loeb Story.
It is loosely based on the Leopold and Loeb case.

Albert Henry Loeb

Albert Loeb
Richard Loeb was born on June 11, 1905, in Chicago to the family of Anna Henrietta (née Bohnen) and Albert Henry Loeb, a wealthy lawyer and retired vice president of Sears, Roebuck & Company.
Albert Henry Loeb (February 18, 1868 – October 27, 1924) was a Chicago attorney and an executive of Sears, Roebuck and Co. Loeb was also the father of convicted murderer Richard Albert Loeb of the infamous Leopold and Loeb.

Alfred Hitchcock

HitchcockHitchcockianSir Alfred Hitchcock
The Franks murder has been the inspiration for several dramatic works, including Patrick Hamilton's 1929 play Rope and Alfred Hitchcock's 1948 film of the same name.
It was inspired by the Leopold and Loeb case of the 1920s.

University of Chicago

The University of ChicagoChicagoChicago University
Nathan Freudenthal Leopold Jr. (November 19, 1904 – August 29, 1971) and Richard Albert Loeb (June 11, 1905 – January 28, 1936), usually referred to collectively as Leopold and Loeb, were two wealthy students at the University of Chicago who in May 1924 kidnapped and murdered 14-year-old Bobby Franks in Chicago.
Three students from the university have been prosecuted in notable court cases: the infamous thrill killers Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb and high school science teacher John T. Scopes who was tried in the Scopes Monkey Trial for teaching evolution.

Robert E. Crowe

The state's attorney, Robert E. Crowe, presented over a hundred witnesses documenting details of the crime.
Robert Emmett Crowe (January 22, 1879 - January 18, 1958) was a Chicago lawyer and politician, who is best known as the prosecutor in the 1924 Leopold and Loeb murder case.

Meyer Levin

Compulsion
In the early 1950s, author Meyer Levin, a University of Chicago classmate, requested Leopold's cooperation in writing a novel based on the Franks murder.
Perhaps best known for his work on the Leopold and Loeb case, Levin worked as a journalist (for the Chicago Daily News and, from 1933–39, as an editor for Esquire).

Trial of the century

Trials of the CenturyThe Trial of the Century
The trial of Leopold and Loeb, at Chicago's Cook County Courthouse (now Courthouse Place), became a media spectacle, and the third – after those of Harry Thaw and Sacco and Vanzetti – to be labeled "the trial of the century."

Perfect crime

perfect murderPerfect murder (fiction)
They committed the murder – characterized at the time as "the crime of the century" – as a demonstration of their perceived intellectual superiority, which, they thought, enabled them to carry out a "perfect crime" and absolved them of responsibility for their actions.

Joliet Correctional Center

Joliet PrisonJolietIllinois State Penitentiary
Leopold and Loeb were initially held at Joliet Prison.
In 1924, Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb were given life sentences to be served at Joliet (after their successful defense—from the death penalty—by Clarence Darrow).

Courthouse Place

Cook County Criminal Court BuildingChicago's Criminal Courts BuildingCook County Jail
The trial of Leopold and Loeb, at Chicago's Cook County Courthouse (now Courthouse Place), became a media spectacle, and the third – after those of Harry Thaw and Sacco and Vanzetti – to be labeled "the trial of the century."
For its first 35 years, the present Courthouse Place building housed the Cook County Criminal Courts and was the site of many legendary trials, including the Leopold and Loeb murder case, the Black Sox Scandal, and the jazz age trials that formed the basis of the play and musical Chicago.

Wolf Lake (Indiana–Illinois)

Wolf LakeWolf Lake, Illinois
With the body on the floorboard out of view, they drove to their predetermined dumping spot near Wolf Lake in Hammond, Indiana, 25 mi south of Chicago.
In 1924, the body of Bobby Franks was found in a culvert just northwest of the lake.

Übermensch

supermanOvermansupermen
Leopold was particularly fascinated by Friedrich Nietzsche's concept of supermen (Übermenschen) – transcendent individuals, possessing extraordinary and unusual capabilities, whose superior intellects allowed them to rise above the laws and rules that bound the unimportant, average populace.

John Logan (writer)

John LoganDesert Wolf Productions
Never the Sinner, John Logan's 1988 play, was based on contemporary newspaper accounts of the case, and included an explicit portrayal of Leopold and Loeb's sexual relationship.
His first play, Never the Sinner, tells the story of the infamous Leopold and Loeb case.

Kenwood, Chicago

KenwoodKenwood neighborhoodK'''enwood
The two young men grew up with their respective families in the affluent Kenwood neighborhood on Chicago's South Side.

Stateville Correctional Center

Stateville PenitentiaryIllinois State PenitentiaryStateville Prison
Leopold was later transferred to Stateville Penitentiary, and Loeb was eventually transferred there as well.

Thrill Me

Thrill Me: The Leopold & Loeb Story
Other works influenced by the case include Richard Wright's 1940 novel Native Son, the Canadian Television show Murdoch Mysteries, Tom Kalin's 1992 film Swoon, Michael Haneke's 1997 Austrian film Funny Games and the 2008 International remake, the 2002 black comedy R.S.V.P., Barbet Schroeder's Murder by Numbers (2002), Daniel Clowes's 2005 graphic novel Ice Haven, and Stephen Dolginoff's 2005 Off-Broadway musical Thrill Me: The Leopold and Loeb Story.
It is based on the true story of Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb, the so-called "thrill killers" who murdered a young boy in 1924 in order to commit "the perfect crime."

Stephen Dolginoff

Other works influenced by the case include Richard Wright's 1940 novel Native Son, the Canadian Television show Murdoch Mysteries, Tom Kalin's 1992 film Swoon, Michael Haneke's 1997 Austrian film Funny Games and the 2008 International remake, the 2002 black comedy R.S.V.P., Barbet Schroeder's Murder by Numbers (2002), Daniel Clowes's 2005 graphic novel Ice Haven, and Stephen Dolginoff's 2005 Off-Broadway musical Thrill Me: The Leopold and Loeb Story.
His most notable work is Thrill Me, the musical version of the true story of Leopold and Loeb, which opened Off-Broadway at the York Theatre in 2005, featuring Dolginoff himself as Nathan Leopold.

Stateville Penitentiary Malaria Study

Malaria experiments
In 1944, Leopold volunteered for the Stateville Penitentiary Malaria Study; he was deliberately inoculated with malaria pathogens and then subjected to multiple experimental malaria treatments.
A well-known participant of the study was Nathan Leopold, who (together with Richard Loeb, who was killed after being sentenced) kidnapped and murdered a teenager, while they were students at the University of Chicago.

Ice Haven

Other works influenced by the case include Richard Wright's 1940 novel Native Son, the Canadian Television show Murdoch Mysteries, Tom Kalin's 1992 film Swoon, Michael Haneke's 1997 Austrian film Funny Games and the 2008 International remake, the 2002 black comedy R.S.V.P., Barbet Schroeder's Murder by Numbers (2002), Daniel Clowes's 2005 graphic novel Ice Haven, and Stephen Dolginoff's 2005 Off-Broadway musical Thrill Me: The Leopold and Loeb Story.
After he loans Charles a book about the Leopold and Loeb murder (the contents of which are summarized in a one-page comic strip), Charles suspects he might be involved in David Goldberg's disappearance.

Tom Kalin

Other works influenced by the case include Richard Wright's 1940 novel Native Son, the Canadian Television show Murdoch Mysteries, Tom Kalin's 1992 film Swoon, Michael Haneke's 1997 Austrian film Funny Games and the 2008 International remake, the 2002 black comedy R.S.V.P., Barbet Schroeder's Murder by Numbers (2002), Daniel Clowes's 2005 graphic novel Ice Haven, and Stephen Dolginoff's 2005 Off-Broadway musical Thrill Me: The Leopold and Loeb Story.
Swoon, Kalin's feature film debut in 1992, was based on the 1924 Leopold and Loeb murder case.