Krakowska Gate in the Old Town is among the city's most recognisable landmarks.
Wawel Castle in Kraków
Union of Lublin, painting by Jan Matejko at the National Museum of Lublin
Old Town in Lublin
19th-century drawing of the Lublin Old Town by Adam Lerue
Mannerist architecture in Tarnów
German and Soviet troops in Lublin during the invasion of Poland in September 1939
The Lesser Poland Province of the Polish Crown in the widest sense – with Red Ruthenia, Podlachia, Podolia and Kiev
Monument and cemetery in Rury where the Germans massacred around 500 Poles in 1940
Palm Sunday in Lipnica Murowana.
The site of the former Majdanek concentration camp, located on the outskirts of Lublin
The 1507 Lesser Poland and Red Ruthenia Map (Polonia Minor, Russia) by Martin Waldseemüller
Marie Curie Monument near the Maria Curie-Skłodowska University (UMCS
Kazimierz Dolny on the right bank of the Vistula river.
Polish MPs in the PZL Świdnik helicopter factory
Niepołomice
Perła – Browary Lubelskie
Pieniny National Park
Lublin Airport
Będzin Castle, which guarded the western border of Lesser Poland
Lublin Główny railway station, the city's main train station
Kozłówka Palace
Lublin has one of three trolleybus systems in Poland
Palatial residence in Kurozwęki
The Centre for the Meeting of Cultures and Teatralny Square, view from the Lublin Conference Center
Pieskowa Skała
National Museum in Lublin
Members of the regional Folk Group of Wilamowice "Cepelia Fil Wilamowice"
Old Theatre in Lublin, opening night
Lachy Sądeckie are a group of ethnic Poles who live in southern Lesser Poland
Crown Tribunal in the Old Town
Broad Gauge Metallurgy Line
Historic tenement houses at the Market Square
Czarny Staw (Black Pond) in the High Tatras
Litewski Square
Nowy Wiśnicz
Krakowskie Przedmieście, one of the main streets of the historic city center
Baranów Sandomierski
Grand Hotel Lublinianka
Vistula in Sandomierz
Arena Lublin
"Peasant war" by Jan Lewicki (1795–1871)
Faculty of Biotechnology, KUL
Galizien
Faculty of Information Technology, UMCS
In the 19th century, Kraków's Jagiellonian University was a major center of Polish science and culture
Lublin City Hall
Gorals from Beskidy
Stanisław Kostka Potocki
Castle of Bobolice
Józef Ignacy Kraszewski
Wieliczka Salt Mine, a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Henryk Wieniawski
Pope John Paul II was born in Wadowice, Lesser Poland, in 1920
Juliusz Osterwa Theatre
Soldiers of Holy Cross Mountains Brigade in parade 1945
Lublin Cathedral
A fire engine made by FSC Star in Lesser Poland's Starachowice
Interior of the Cathedral
Boundary between Lesser Poland and Upper Silesia (red line) on the territory of current Silesian Voivodeship
Trinitarian Tower
Kraków is the capital of Lesser Poland
St. Stanislaus Basilica
Lublin, the second-largest city of Lesser Poland
Courtyard of the Dominican Abbey
Częstochowa, the third-largest city of Lesser Poland
UMCS Botanical Gardens
Radom, the fourth-largest city of Lesser Poland
14th-century Holy Trinity Chapel
Sosnowiec, the fifth-largest city of Lesser Poland
Frescoes inside the chapel
Folklore group in Podhale costume, Bukowina Tatrzańska, Lesser Poland, 2016
Grodzka Gate
Polish flat soda bread (known as Proziaki in podkarpacie)
A street fair in the Old Town
KS Cracovia on Independence Day 2019
440th anniversary of the Union of Lublin
A map of Polish dialects. The area where Lesser Poland's dialect is spoken is marked in orange.
Birthplace of composer Henryk Wieniawski
House of poet Sebastian Klonowic
Zemborzyce Lake
Saints Peter and Paul church
Transfiguration church
The first part of a bypass road around Lublin
Radio & TV tower in Lublin

Lublin is the ninth-largest city in Poland and the second-largest city of historical Lesser Poland.

- Lublin

As a result of this long-lasting division, many inhabitants of the northern part of Lesser Poland (including those in such cities as Lublin, Radom, Kielce and Częstochowa) do not recognize their Lesser Polish identity.

- Lesser Poland

14 related topics

Alpha

Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth

Country and federation of Poland and Lithuania ruled by a common monarch in real union, who was both King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania.

Country and federation of Poland and Lithuania ruled by a common monarch in real union, who was both King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania.

The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (green) with vassal states (light green) at their peak in 1619
The Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1526.
The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (green) with vassal states (light green) at their peak in 1619
The Union of Lublin joined the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1569.
The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth at its greatest extent in 1619.
Sigismund III Vasa was a religious zealot and an enlightened despot who presided over an era of prosperity and achievement. His reign also marked the Commonwealth's largest territorial expansion.
Sejm of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (parliment) in the early 17th century
John III Sobieski, victor over the Ottoman Turks at the Battle of Vienna in 1683.
Augustus II the Strong, King of Poland and Elector of Saxony, wearing the Order of the White Eagle which he established in 1705.
Partitions of Poland in 1772, 1793 and 1795.
Royal Castle in Warsaw was the formal residence of Polish kings after the capital was moved from Kraków in 1596
Crown Tribunal in Lublin was the highest court of appeals in the Kingdom of Poland
Palace of the Lithuanian Tribunal in Vilnius, which exclusively was the highest appeal court for the Lithuanian nobility in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania
The Republic at the Zenith of Its Power, the Royal Election of 1573
The Constitution of 3 May adopted in 1791 was the first modern constitution in Europe.
Cereals exports in the years 1619–1799. Agriculture, once extremely profitable to the nobility, became much less so after the mid-17th century.
A historical re-enactor dressed in the Polish Winged Hussars armour
Multi-stage rocket from Artis Magnæ Artilleriæ pars prima by Kazimierz Siemienowicz
Krasiczyn Castle was built between 1580-1631 in the mannerist style.
Wilanów Palace, completed in 1696, exemplifies the opulence of royal and noble residences in the Commonwealth.
Nieborów Palace designed by Dutch architect Tylman van Gameren and built in 1697
Social strata in the Commonwealth's society in 1655. From left: Jew, barber surgeon, painter, butcher, musician, tailor, barmaid, pharmacist, shoemaker, goldsmith, merchant and Armenian
Population density of the Commonwealth per each voivodeship in 1650
Saints Peter and Paul Church in Kraków was built between 1597-1619 by the Jesuit order
Original act of the Warsaw Confederation in 1573, the first act of religious freedom in Europe
First anniversary anthem of the Constitution of 3 May 1791 (1792) in Hebrew, Polish, German and French
Topographical map of the Commonwealth in 1764
Statuta Regni Poloniae in ordinem alphabeti digesta (Statutes of the Polish Kingdom, Arranged in Alphabetical Order), 1563
Grand Marshal of the Crown Łukasz Opaliński portraited with the insignium of his power in the parliament - the Marshal's cane, 1640
Rococo iconostasis in the Orthodox Church of the Holy Spirit in Vilnius, designed by Johann Christoph Glaubitz, 1753–1756
18th century amber casket. Gdańsk patronized by the Polish court flourished as the center for amber working in the 17th century.<ref name="gordon_campbell">{{cite book |author=Gordon Campbell |title=The Grove encyclopedia of decorative arts |year=2006 |page=13 |publisher=Oxford University Press US |isbn=01-95189-48-5}}</ref>
Stanisław Poniatowski, Commander of the Royal Guards and Grand Treasurer. Painted by Angelika Kauffmann in 1786.
Equestrian portrait of King Sigismund III of Poland, by Peter Paul Rubens, 1624
Tapestry with the arms of Michał Kazimierz Pac, Jan Leyniers, Brussels, 1667–1669
Silver tankard by Józef Ceypler, Kraków, 1739–1745
Example of the merchant architecture: Konopnica's tenement house in Lublin, 1575
Hussars' armours, first half of the 17th century
De republica emendanda (1554) by Andrzej Frycz Modrzewski, proposed a deep programme of reforms of the state, society and church.
Merkuriusz Polski Ordynaryjny, the first Polish newspaper published on the orders of Queen Marie Louise Gonzaga in 1661
Title page of Treny (1580) by Jan Kochanowski, a series of elegies upon the death of his beloved daughter, is an acknowledged masterpiece.
A plate from Michał Boym's Flora Sinensis (1656), the first description of an ecosystem of the Far East published in Europe<ref>{{cite book |author1=Gwei-Djen Lu |author2=Joseph Needham |author3=Vivienne Lo |title=Celestial lancets: a history and rationale of acupuncture and moxa |year=2002 |page=284 |publisher=Routledge |isbn=07-00714-58-8}}</ref>
Taurus Poniatovii, constellation originated by Marcin Poczobutt in 1777 to honor the king Stanisław II Augustus<ref>{{cite web |author=Ian Ridpath |url=http://www.ianridpath.com/startales/poniatowski.htm |title=Taurus Poniatovii - Poniatowski's bull |work=www.ianridpath.com |access-date=2009-05-18}}</ref>
Branicki Palace in Białystok, designed by Tylman van Gameren, is sometimes referred to as the "Polish Versailles."
Pažaislis Monastery in Kaunas, Pietro Puttini, built 1674–1712
Zamość City Hall, designed by Bernardo Morando, is a unique example of Renaissance architecture in Europe, consistently built in accordance with the Italian theories of an "ideal town."<ref name="unesco.org">{{cite web |url=http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/564 |title=Old City of Zamość |publisher=UNESCO World Heritage Centre |date=2009-09-23 |access-date=2011-09-15}}</ref>
Plafond Allegory of Spring, Jerzy Siemiginowski, 1680s, Wilanów Palace
Łańcut Synagogue was established by Stanisław Lubomirski, 1733.<ref>After a fire had destroyed a wooden synagogue in 1733 Stanislaw Lubomirski decided to found a new bricked synagogue building. {{cite web |author=Polin Travel |url=http://www.jewish-guide.pl/sites/lancut |title=Lancut |work=www.jewish-guide.pl|access-date=2010-09-02}}</ref>
Saints Peter and Paul Church in Kraków was built between 1597-1619 by the Jesuit order

A parliament (sejm) convened on 10 January 1569 in the city of Lublin, attended by envoys from both nations.

The average population density per square kilometer was: 24 in Mazovia, 23 in Lesser Poland, 19 in Greater Poland, 12 in Lublin palatinate, 10 in the Lwów area, 7 in Podolia and Volhynia, and 3 in the Kiev Voivodeship.

Crown of the Kingdom of Poland

Common name for the historic Late Middle Ages territorial possessions of the King of Poland, including the Kingdom of Poland proper.

Common name for the historic Late Middle Ages territorial possessions of the King of Poland, including the Kingdom of Poland proper.

Crown of the Kingdom of Poland within Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1635.
Banner of the Kingdom of Poland until the 15th century
Banner of Poland and Lithuania in the Chronicle of the Council of Constance (1416)
First page of the original Constitution
Crown of the Kingdom of Poland, 1635
Voivodeships of the Commonwealth of the Two Nations
Map showing voivodeships of the Commonwealth of the Two Nations
The Crown and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania 1386–1434
The Spiš (Zips) region. Light blue and green areas show the pawned territories, red line shows current borders, yellow former border between then Hungary and Poland and the black borders between counties

After the Union of Lublin (1569) Crown lands were divided into two provinces: Lesser Poland (Polish: Małopolska) and Greater Poland (Polish: Wielkopolska).

Lublin Voivodeship (województwo lubelskie, Lublin)

Poland

Country in Central Europe.

Country in Central Europe.

A reconstruction of a Bronze Age, Lusatian culture settlement in Biskupin, 8th century BC
Poland under the rule of Mieszko I, whose acceptance of Christianity under the auspices of the Latin Church and the Baptism of Poland marked the beginning of statehood in 966.
Casimir III the Great is the only Polish king to receive the title of Great. He built extensively during his reign, and reformed the Polish army along with the country's legal code, 1333–70.
The Battle of Grunwald was fought against the German Order of Teutonic Knights, and resulted in a decisive victory for the Kingdom of Poland, 15 July 1410.
Wawel Castle in Kraków, seat of Polish kings from 1038 until the capital was moved to Warsaw in 1596.
King John III Sobieski defeated the Ottoman Turks at the Battle of Vienna on 12 September 1683.
Stanisław II Augustus, the last King of Poland, reigned from 1764 until his abdication on 25 November 1795.
The partitions of Poland, carried out by the Kingdom of Prussia (blue), the Russian Empire (brown), and the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy (green) in 1772, 1793 and 1795.
Chief of State Marshal Józef Piłsudski was a hero of the Polish independence campaign and the nation's premiere statesman from 1918 until his death on 12 May 1935.
Polish Army 7TP tanks on military manoeuvres shortly before the invasion of Poland in 1939
Pilots of the 303 Polish Fighter Squadron during the Battle of Britain, October 1940
Map of the Holocaust in German-occupied Poland with deportation routes and massacre sites. Major ghettos are marked with yellow stars. Nazi extermination camps are marked with white skulls in black squares. The border in 1941 between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union is marked in red.
At High Noon, 4 June 1989 — political poster featuring Gary Cooper to encourage votes for the Solidarity party in the 1989 elections
Flowers in front of the Presidential Palace following the death of Poland's top government officials in a plane crash on 10 April 2010
Topographic map of Poland
Morskie Oko alpine lake in the Tatra Mountains. Poland has one of the highest densities of lakes in the world.
The wisent, one of Poland's national animals, is commonly found at the ancient and UNESCO-protected Białowieża Forest.
The Sejm is the lower house of the parliament of Poland.
The Constitution of 3 May adopted in 1791 was the first modern constitution in Europe.
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs, located in Warsaw
Polish Air Force F-16s, a single-engine multirole fighter aircraft
A Mercedes-Benz Sprinter patrol van belonging to the Polish State Police Service (Policja)
The Old City of Zamość is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
PKP Intercity Pendolino at the Wrocław railway station
Physicist and chemist Maria Skłodowska-Curie was the first person to win two Nobel Prizes.
Nicolaus Copernicus, the 16th century Polish astronomer who formulated the heliocentric model of the solar system.
Population of Poland from 1900 to 2010 in millions of inhabitants
Dolina Jadwigi — a bilingual Polish-Kashubian road sign with the village name
John Paul II, born Karol Wojtyła, held the papacy between 1978-2005 and was the first Pole to become a Roman Catholic Pope.
Jagiellonian University in Kraków
The Polish White Eagle is Poland's enduring national and cultural symbol
All Saints' Day on 1 November is one of the most important public holidays in Poland.
Lady with an Ermine (1490) by Leonardo da Vinci. It symbolises Poland's cultural heritage and identity.
Selection of hearty traditional comfort food from Poland, including bigos, gołąbki, żurek, pierogi, placki ziemniaczane, and rye bread.
Traditional polonaise dresses, 1780–1785.
Andrzej Wajda, the recipient of an Honorary Oscar, the Palme d'Or, as well as Honorary Golden Lion and Golden Bear Awards.
Headquarters of the publicly funded national television network TVP in Warsaw
The Stadion Narodowy in Warsaw, home of the national football team, and one of the host stadiums of Euro 2012.

The exonym derives from Lech, a legendary ruler of the Lechites, or from the Lendians that dwelled on the south-easternmost edge of present-day Lesser Poland region.

Other cities attracting countless tourists include Gdańsk, Poznań, Lublin, Toruń as well as the site of the German Auschwitz concentration camp in Oświęcim.

Map of Polish voivodeships since 1999 (abbreviations)

Voivodeships of Poland

Highest-level administrative division of Poland, corresponding to a province in many other countries.

Highest-level administrative division of Poland, corresponding to a province in many other countries.

Map of Polish voivodeships since 1999 (abbreviations)

Before the third and last Partition of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, which occurred in 1795, each of the main constituent regions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth—Greater Poland, Lesser Poland, Lithuania, and Royal Prussia—was sometimes idiosyncratically referred to as a "Province" (prowincja).

Lublin Voivodeship (województwo lubelskie, Lublin)

Allegory of the first partition of Poland, showing Catherine the Great of Russia (left), Joseph II of Austria and Frederick the Great of Prussia (right) quarrelling over their territorial seizures

Partitions of Poland

The Partitions of Poland were three partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth that took place toward the end of the 18th century and ended the existence of the state, resulting in the elimination of sovereign Poland and Lithuania for 123 years.

The Partitions of Poland were three partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth that took place toward the end of the 18th century and ended the existence of the state, resulting in the elimination of sovereign Poland and Lithuania for 123 years.

Allegory of the first partition of Poland, showing Catherine the Great of Russia (left), Joseph II of Austria and Frederick the Great of Prussia (right) quarrelling over their territorial seizures
Włodzimierz Tetmajer, Allegory of Dead Poland, St. Nicholas Cathedral, Kalisz
The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth after the First Partition, as a protectorate of the Russian Empire (1773–89)
Rejtan at Sejm 1773, oil on canvas by Jan Matejko, 1866, 282 x, Royal Castle in Warsaw
The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth after the Second Partition (1793)
1793 Russian campaign medal
"A map of the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania including Samogitia and Curland divided according to their dismemberments with the Kingdom of Prussia" from 1799
The partition of Poland according to the German–Soviet Pact; division of Polish territories in the years 1939–1941

To Austria fell Zator and Auschwitz (Oświęcim), part of Lesser Poland embracing parts of the counties of Kraków and Sandomir and the whole of Galicia, less the city of Kraków.

The Russian part included 120000 km² and 1.2 million people with Vilnius, the Prussian part (new provinces of New East Prussia and New Silesia) 55000 km² and 1 million people with Warsaw, and the Austrian 47000 km² with 1.2 million and Lublin and Kraków.

Lesser Poland Province, 1635 (in red)

Lesser Poland Province, Crown of the Kingdom of Poland

Administrative division of the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland from 1569 until 1795 and the biggest province of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.

Administrative division of the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland from 1569 until 1795 and the biggest province of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.

Lesser Poland Province, 1635 (in red)
The Crown Tribunal in Lublin, the highest appeal court in the province of Lesser Poland

The name of the province comes from historic land of Lesser Poland.

The locations of the Crown Tribunal for the Lesser Poland Province were initially Lublin and Łuck (Lutsk), after 1590 only Lublin, after the Convocation Sejm (1764) also Lwów (Lviv), and again after 1768 only Lublin.

Building of the Crown Tribunal in Lublin

Crown Tribunal

The highest appeal court in the Crown of the Polish Kingdom for most cases.

The highest appeal court in the Crown of the Polish Kingdom for most cases.

Building of the Crown Tribunal in Lublin

Two main locations of the Crown Tribunal were Piotrków Trybunalski (for the lands of Greater Poland, held in autumn and winter) and Lublin (for the lands of Lesser Poland, in spring and summer).

Lublin Voivodeship

Voivodeship, or region, located in southeastern Poland.

Voivodeship, or region, located in southeastern Poland.

Historic centre of Lublin
Basilica of the Birth of the Virgin Mary in Chełm
The Zamość Old Town is a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Radziwiłł Castle Complex in Biała Podlaska
Czartoryski Palace in Puławy
The Potocki Family Palace in Międzyrzec Podlaski
The town of Kazimierz Dolny is Poland's official national Historic Monument
Łukie Lake in the Polesie National Park
Echo artificial lake in the Roztocze National Park
Map of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
Lublin Voivodeship 1975–1998

The region is named after its largest city and regional capital, Lublin, and its territory is made of four historical lands: the western part of the voivodeship, with Lublin itself, belongs to Lesser Poland, the eastern part of Lublin Area belongs to Red Ruthenia, and the northeast belongs to Polesie and Podlasie.

The occupation of the Commonwealth by Sweden, Russia, Brandenburg and Khmelnytsky's Cossacks

Deluge (history)

Series of mid-17th-century campaigns in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.

Series of mid-17th-century campaigns in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The occupation of the Commonwealth by Sweden, Russia, Brandenburg and Khmelnytsky's Cossacks
Nineteenth-century reimagining of the 1655 Siege of Jasna Góra.
Swedish Siege of Kraków in 1655
The Vow of John Casimir by Jan Matejko (1838–1893) shows the Polish king in Lwów in 1655, pledging to drive out the Swedes.
Battle of Warsaw in 1656
Transylvanian–Swedish Siege of Brest in 1657, painted by E. Dahlbergh
Siege of Toruń in 1658
Charles X Gustav in skirmish with Tatars at the battle of Warsaw, July 29, 1656. Johan Philip Lemke, oil on canvas, 1684.

With the three most populated and best developed Polish provinces in his hands (Greater Poland, Lesser Poland and Mazovia), Charles Gustav decided to head back northwards to Royal Prussia, which was defended by the Voivode of Malbork, Jakub Wejher.

Soon Polish Army units began to concentrate in the area of Lwów, including militias from Red Ruthenia, Volhynia and Lublin, as well as forces under Potocki and Prince Lubomirski, together with the garrison of Kamieniec Podolski fortress.

Document, signed in Kreva on 14 August 1385

Union of Krewo

In a strict sense, the Union of Krewo or Act of Krėva (also spelled Union of Krevo, Act of Kreva; Крэўская унія; unia w Krewie; Krėvos sutartis) comprised a set of prenuptial promises made at Kreva Castle on 14 August 1385 by Jogaila, Grand Duke of Lithuania, in regard to his prospective marriage to the underage reigning Queen Jadwiga of Poland.

In a strict sense, the Union of Krewo or Act of Krėva (also spelled Union of Krevo, Act of Kreva; Крэўская унія; unia w Krewie; Krėvos sutartis) comprised a set of prenuptial promises made at Kreva Castle on 14 August 1385 by Jogaila, Grand Duke of Lithuania, in regard to his prospective marriage to the underage reigning Queen Jadwiga of Poland.

Document, signed in Kreva on 14 August 1385
Poland and Lithuania in 1387
Monument of Jadwiga and Jogaila in Kraków

Nobles from Lesser Poland, including Spytek of Melsztyn, Jan of Tarnów, and Jan Tęczyński, proposed that Jadwiga marry Jogaila, Grand Duke of Lithuania.

The election was concluded on 1 February in Lublin.