Lesser Poland

Wawel Castle in Kraków
Old Town in Lublin
Mannerist architecture in Tarnów
The Lesser Poland Province of the Polish Crown in the widest sense – with Red Ruthenia, Podlachia, Podolia and Kiev
Palm Sunday in Lipnica Murowana.
The 1507 Lesser Poland and Red Ruthenia Map (Polonia Minor, Russia) by Martin Waldseemüller
Kazimierz Dolny on the right bank of the Vistula river.
Niepołomice
Pieniny National Park
Będzin Castle, which guarded the western border of Lesser Poland
Kozłówka Palace
Palatial residence in Kurozwęki
Pieskowa Skała
Members of the regional Folk Group of Wilamowice "Cepelia Fil Wilamowice"
Lachy Sądeckie are a group of ethnic Poles who live in southern Lesser Poland
Broad Gauge Metallurgy Line
Czarny Staw (Black Pond) in the High Tatras
Nowy Wiśnicz
Baranów Sandomierski
Vistula in Sandomierz
"Peasant war" by Jan Lewicki (1795–1871)
Galizien
In the 19th century, Kraków's Jagiellonian University was a major center of Polish science and culture
Gorals from Beskidy
Castle of Bobolice
Wieliczka Salt Mine, a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Pope John Paul II was born in Wadowice, Lesser Poland, in 1920
Soldiers of Holy Cross Mountains Brigade in parade 1945
A fire engine made by FSC Star in Lesser Poland's Starachowice
Boundary between Lesser Poland and Upper Silesia (red line) on the territory of current Silesian Voivodeship
Kraków is the capital of Lesser Poland
Lublin, the second-largest city of Lesser Poland
Częstochowa, the third-largest city of Lesser Poland
Radom, the fourth-largest city of Lesser Poland
Sosnowiec, the fifth-largest city of Lesser Poland
Folklore group in Podhale costume, Bukowina Tatrzańska, Lesser Poland, 2016
Polish flat soda bread (known as Proziaki in podkarpacie)
KS Cracovia on Independence Day 2019
A map of Polish dialects. The area where Lesser Poland's dialect is spoken is marked in orange.

Historical region situated in southern and south-eastern Poland.

- Lesser Poland

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Sejmik in a church, by Jean-Pierre Norblin de La Gourdaine (1745–1830)

Sejmik

One of various local parliaments in the history of Poland and history of Lithuania.

One of various local parliaments in the history of Poland and history of Lithuania.

Sejmik in a church, by Jean-Pierre Norblin de La Gourdaine (1745–1830)
Nobility fighting at a sejmik, Jean-Pierre Norblin de La Gourdaine

General (Polish: generalny, Latin conventiones generales), held in western Poland (Greater Poland) at Koło, in southern Poland (Little Poland) at Nowe Miasto Korczyn, in Masovia at Warsaw, in Red Ruthenia at Sądowa Wisznia (Sudova Vyshnia), and in Lithuania at Wołkowysk (Vawkavysk). The General Sejmiks were composed of delegates elected at the provincial sejmiks, and of Senators. Their goal was to agree on a position for the General Sejm (Sejm Walny) and issue instructions for the deputies on how they were supposed to vote during the General Sejm. The competences of the general sejmiks were defined by precedent and custom rather than law; on rare instances when external circumstances prevented a national Sejm from being convened (such as 1511, 1513 and 1577), the general sejmiks were seen as competent to legislate on national matters. In the 15th century some general sejmiks reserved the right to accept or reject national legislation. In the 16th century they were tasked with preparing drafts of legislation to be discussed at Sejms. Around the 17th century general sejmiks were mostly abandoned (with the exceptions of those in Royal Prussia, see Prussian estates); instead, provincial deputies would meet in special sessions during the Sejm proper.

Red Ruthenia

Term used since the Middle Ages for the south-western principalities of the Kievan Rus', namely the Principality of Peremyshl and the Principality of Belz.

Term used since the Middle Ages for the south-western principalities of the Kievan Rus', namely the Principality of Peremyshl and the Principality of Belz.

Lemkos in folk costumes from Mokre, near Sanok
Pogórzanie folk costumes
The ducal seal of Vladislaus II of Opole (Władysław Opolczyk): "Ladislaus Dei Gracia Dux Opoliensis Wieloniensis et Terre Russie Domin et Heres" (c. 1387)
The 1507 Lesser Poland and Red Ruthenia Map (Polonia Minor; Russia) by Martin Waldseemüller
Village of Markowa, about 150-200 km southeast of Kraków. Its 18th- and 19th-century Upper Lusatian houses evoked the mountains of Saxony.
Bieszczady Mountains

It has also sometimes included parts of Lesser Poland, Podolia, "Right-bank Ukraine" and Volhynia.

Lesser Poland Voivodeship

Voivodeship (province), in southern Poland.

Voivodeship (province), in southern Poland.

The Wieliczka Salt Mine is a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Kraków, capital of Lesser Poland
Tarnów
Nowy Sącz
Oświęcim
Chrzanów
Olkusz
Nowy Targ
Bochnia
The spa town of Szczawnica in the Pieniny Mountains
Czarny Staw in the High Tatras

The province's name recalls the traditional name of a historic Polish region, Lesser Poland, or in Polish: Małopolska.

Masovian Voivodeship

Largest and most populous of the 16 Polish provinces, or voivodeships.

Largest and most populous of the 16 Polish provinces, or voivodeships.

Population density by gmina (at 2007-01-01)
A moose in the Kampinos National Park (a UNESCO-designated biosphere reserve)
Koleje Mazowieckie (Masovian Railways)
Płock Cathedral, burial site of Polish monarchs
Warsaw Old Town, a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Liw Castle
Saint Catherine of Alexandria church in Radom
Palace in Otwock Wielki
Szydłowiec Town Hall
Wilanów Palace in Warsaw
Łyszkiewicz Apartment in Warsaw, birthplace of Marie Curie, presently a museum of the Nobel Prize winner
Birthplace of Frédéric Chopin in Żelazowa Wola, presently a museum of the composer
Modlin Fortress

However, southern part of the voivodeship, with Radom, historically belongs to Lesser Poland, while Łomża and its surroundings, even though historically part of Mazovia, now is part of Podlaskie Voivodeship.

Saint Wenceslaus church, the city's oldest church

Radom

City in east-central Poland, located approximately 100 km south of the capital, Warsaw.

City in east-central Poland, located approximately 100 km south of the capital, Warsaw.

Saint Wenceslaus church, the city's oldest church
Saint John the Baptist church, founded by King Casimir III the Great in the 14th century
Plaque at the Radom Castle commemorating the adoption of the Nihil novi act in Radom in 1505
Piarist College in the 19th century
City map from 1919
Former seat of the Gestapo and NKVD during the occupation
Monument and cemetery in Firlej where the Germans murdered around 15,000 Poles and Jews
Radom in the 1970s
Radom Cathedral
Building of the former Land Credit Society
Jacek Malczewski Museum and Polish Legions monument
Polish Basketball League match between Rosa Radom and Trefl Sopot in Radom in 2014
Transport in Radom
Radom University
Public Library
Headquarters of Polish Armaments Group
MSBS rifle from Łucznik Arms Factory
Courthouse
Jan Kochanowski monument
Jacek Malczewski monument
Leszek Kołakowski monument
Radom Airport
Bus Solaris Urbino 12
Main railway station
Biking in Radom

Despite being part of the Masovian Voivodeship, the city historically belongs to Lesser Poland.

Tarnów

City in southeastern Poland with 107,498 inhabitants and a metropolitan area population of 269,000 inhabitants.

City in southeastern Poland with 107,498 inhabitants and a metropolitan area population of 269,000 inhabitants.

Polish Gothic-styled Cathedral of the Nativity located in the Old Town district
Casimir the Great Square
Tarnów Cathedral preserved one of the most extraordinary examples of renaissance and mannerist tomb monuments in the country.
Market Square in Tarnów in 1800, painting by Zygmunt Vogel
Tomb of General Józef Bem, national hero of Poland, Hungary and the former Ottoman Empire
First transport of Polish captives deported from Tarnów to Auschwitz concentration camp during German AB-Aktion in Poland, June 1940
Ludwik Solski Theatre
Jewish men humiliated and tortured by German policemen
Existing remains of the old synagogue
Grupa Azoty headquarters in Tarnów's industrial district Mościce
Railway station in Tarnów (1906) was registered as historical monument of Art Nouveau (1975).
Railway station in Tarnów Mościce (1976) was registered as historical monument of modern architecture (2021).
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Market Square with historic and colourful tenements
PWSZT College in Tarnów
Unia Tarnów speedway team in 2007
Gothic Revival Church of the Holy Family
Józef Bem
Józef Cyrankiewicz
Michał Heller
Jan Amor Tarnowski

The settlement was probably destroyed in the 1030s or the 1050s, during either a popular rebellion against Christianity (see Baptism of Poland), or Czech invasion of Lesser Poland.

Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship

One of the 16 voivodeships (provinces) into which Poland is divided.

One of the 16 voivodeships (provinces) into which Poland is divided.

Kielce is the capital of the voivodeship
Ostrowiec Świętokrzyski is the second most populous city
Sandomierz is one of the main tourist destinations in the Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship
Kurozwęki Palace
Świętokrzyski National Park

It is situated in southeastern Poland, in the historical region of Lesser Poland, and takes its name from the Świętokrzyskie (Holy Cross) mountain range.

EC Będzin power-plant and panorama

Dąbrowa Basin

Geographical and historical region in southern Poland.

Geographical and historical region in southern Poland.

EC Będzin power-plant and panorama
Defensive castle in Będzin from the Middle Ages
The memorial forest in memory of the Jews of Zagłębie, near the city of Modiin in Israel

It forms western part of Lesser Poland, though it shares some cultural and historical features with the neighbouring Upper Silesia.

Sandomierz

Historic town in south-eastern Poland with 23,863 inhabitants (2017), situated in the Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship (Holy Cross Province) since 1999.

Historic town in south-eastern Poland with 23,863 inhabitants (2017), situated in the Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship (Holy Cross Province) since 1999.

Opatów Gate
Historic coat of arms of the Sandomierz Province
Aerial view of the Old Town in winter
Baroque Saint Michael the Archangel's Church
Blood libel. Sandomierz Cathedral, ca. 1750.
1914. Wounded in action Austro-Hungarian soldiers in Sandomierz during World War I
Memorial plaque at the site of the former secret printing house of the Polish resistance movement
Virgin and Child with Saint Catherine of Alexandria, (1518-1520) by Lucas Cranach the Elder in the Diocesan Museum
Collegium Gostomianum, one of the oldest schools in Poland
Mikołaj Trąba, first Primate of Poland
Town Hall
Market Square (Rynek)
Sandomierz Royal Castle
Church of the Conversion of Saint Paul
St. Jacob's Church, 13th–14th century
Cathedral
Cathedral, interior
Jan Długosz house
Historic well at the main square
Church of St. Michael
Townhouses at the main market square
Bishops' Palace
Post office
House at 31 Rynek

In the past, Sandomierz used to be one of the most important urban centers not only of Lesser Poland, but also of the whole country.

Będzin

City in Zagłębie Dąbrowskie, southern Poland.

City in Zagłębie Dąbrowskie, southern Poland.

Medieval Holy Trinity Church
19th-century view of the Będzin Castle
Early 20th-century view of Będzin
Pre-war tenement houses in Będzin
Mizrachi Synagogue

Even though part of Silesian Voivodeship, Będzin belongs to historic Lesser Poland, and it is one of the oldest towns of this province.