Lester Wunderman

Lester Wunderman (June 22, 1920 – January 9, 2019) was an American advertising executive widely considered the creator of modern-day direct marketing.wikipedia
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Direct marketing

direct responsedirect response marketingdirect mail
Lester Wunderman (June 22, 1920 – January 9, 2019) was an American advertising executive widely considered the creator of modern-day direct marketing.
Lester Wunderman, the founder of Wunderman, Ricotta & Kline, coined the phrase Direct Marketing in 1958.

Wunderman Thompson

WundermanWunderman, Ricotta & KlineCato Johnson
To expand the direct marketing approach, Wunderman and his brother Irving, along with two colleagues, Ed Ricotta and Harry Kline, met on August 20, 1958, in Wunderman's "office" – a $30-a-night room at the Hotel Winslow in New York City – and with combined assets of $60,000 founded their own agency, Wunderman, Ricotta & Kline. WR&K (later acquired by Young & Rubicam and eventually called Wunderman) was responsible for developing and/or promoting the Columbia Record Club, the 1-800 toll-free number for businesses (developed for a Toyota campaign), the magazine subscription card, and the postal ZIP code system.
In 1958, Lester Wunderman, alongside his brother Irving Wunderman, and colleagues Ed Ricotta and Harry Kline, opened Wunderman, Ricotta & Klein (WRK).

Young & Rubicam

Young and RubicamY&RSudler & Hennessey
WR&K (later acquired by Young & Rubicam and eventually called Wunderman) was responsible for developing and/or promoting the Columbia Record Club, the 1-800 toll-free number for businesses (developed for a Toyota campaign), the magazine subscription card, and the postal ZIP code system.
Lester Wunderman, the founder of Wunderman, Ricotta & Kline, in 1958 coined the phrase Direct Marketing to describe the new type of advertising he was practicing.

American Advertising Federation Hall of Fame

Advertising Hall of FameAAF Advertising Hall of FameAAF Hall of Fame
He identified, named, and defined the term "direct marketing" in a 1967 speech at MIT, and was inducted into the Advertising Hall of Fame in 1998.

Toll-free telephone number

toll-freetoll-free number800 number
His innovations included the magazine subscription card, the toll-free 1-800 number, loyalty rewards programs, and many more.

American Jews

JewishJewish AmericanJewish-American
Wunderman was born on June 20, 1920 to a Jewish family in the Bronx, the son of Dorothy (Horowitz) and Harry Wunderman, and was educated at New York City public schools.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Wunderman was born on June 20, 1920 to a Jewish family in the Bronx, the son of Dorothy (Horowitz) and Harry Wunderman, and was educated at New York City public schools.

Columbia House

Columbia Record ClubBMG Music ClubBMG
WR&K (later acquired by Young & Rubicam and eventually called Wunderman) was responsible for developing and/or promoting the Columbia Record Club, the 1-800 toll-free number for businesses (developed for a Toyota campaign), the magazine subscription card, and the postal ZIP code system.

Toyota

Toyota Motor CorporationToyota Motor CompanyToyota Motor
WR&K (later acquired by Young & Rubicam and eventually called Wunderman) was responsible for developing and/or promoting the Columbia Record Club, the 1-800 toll-free number for businesses (developed for a Toyota campaign), the magazine subscription card, and the postal ZIP code system.

ZIP Code

ZIP code(s)ZIP codesZIP code(s)
WR&K (later acquired by Young & Rubicam and eventually called Wunderman) was responsible for developing and/or promoting the Columbia Record Club, the 1-800 toll-free number for businesses (developed for a Toyota campaign), the magazine subscription card, and the postal ZIP code system.

American Express

American Express CompanyAmerican Express BankAmex
A long-time relationship with American Express also led to the first customer rewards program – a breakthrough means of keeping customers loyal to a brand that has since transformed the travel and retail industries as well.

Adweek

Ad WeekTVNewserAdweek Magazine
He was named one of twenty “Advertising Legends and Leaders” by AdWeek Magazine in 1998.

Columbia University

ColumbiaColumbia CollegeUniversity of Columbia
Wunderman lectured at a host of schools, including Columbia University, Fordham University, Boston University, and M.I.T. His book Being Direct: Making Advertising Pay was published in January 1997 and republished with new material in 2004.

Fordham University

FordhamFordham CollegeSt. John's College
Wunderman lectured at a host of schools, including Columbia University, Fordham University, Boston University, and M.I.T. His book Being Direct: Making Advertising Pay was published in January 1997 and republished with new material in 2004.

Boston University

BostonBUUniversity of Boston
Wunderman lectured at a host of schools, including Columbia University, Fordham University, Boston University, and M.I.T. His book Being Direct: Making Advertising Pay was published in January 1997 and republished with new material in 2004.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MITM.I.T.Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
He identified, named, and defined the term "direct marketing" in a 1967 speech at MIT, and was inducted into the Advertising Hall of Fame in 1998. Wunderman lectured at a host of schools, including Columbia University, Fordham University, Boston University, and M.I.T. His book Being Direct: Making Advertising Pay was published in January 1997 and republished with new material in 2004.

Dogon people

DogonDogonsDogon country
An avid art collector, Wunderman donated nearly 300 works of Dogon artifacts to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the balance of his Dogon collection to the Musée de l'Homme in Paris, France. Fifty of his photographs of his Dogon art are part of the permanent collection of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and thirteen other museums.

The New School for Social Research

New School for Social ResearchNew SchoolThe New School
He studied photography at the New School for Social Research and then with private instructors.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Metropolitan Museum of ArtMetropolitan MuseumNew York Metropolitan Museum of Art
Fifty of his photographs of his Dogon art are part of the permanent collection of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and thirteen other museums.

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

Jacqueline KennedyJackie KennedyJacqueline
He, Jacqueline Kennedy, Karl Katz, and Cornell Capa helped found the International Center of Photography in New York.

Karl Katz

He, Jacqueline Kennedy, Karl Katz, and Cornell Capa helped found the International Center of Photography in New York.

Cornell Capa

Cornell
He, Jacqueline Kennedy, Karl Katz, and Cornell Capa helped found the International Center of Photography in New York.

International Center of Photography

International Center for PhotographyInfinity AwardICP
He, Jacqueline Kennedy, Karl Katz, and Cornell Capa helped found the International Center of Photography in New York.

What's My Line?

What's My LineWhat’s My Line?British version of ''What's My Line?
At the time of his death, lived in New York City with his second wife, Dr. Suzanne Cott (born Suzanne Oksman in 1935), who, in the 1950s and 1960s, appeared on television shows such as What's My Line as Sue Oakland, and for many years afterward, was Director of Editorials for WCBS-TV in New York.

WCBS-TV

WCBSCBS New YorkW2XAB
At the time of his death, lived in New York City with his second wife, Dr. Suzanne Cott (born Suzanne Oksman in 1935), who, in the 1950s and 1960s, appeared on television shows such as What's My Line as Sue Oakland, and for many years afterward, was Director of Editorials for WCBS-TV in New York.