Lewis Carroll

Carroll, LewisCharles Lutwidge DodgsonCarrollCharles DodgsonCharles Dodgson ('Lewis Carroll')Charles L. DodgsonCharles L. Dodgson / Lewis CarrollLewis CarrolAliceC. L. Dodgson
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English writer of world-famous children's fiction, notably Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass.wikipedia
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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice in WonderlandAliceWonderland
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English writer of world-famous children's fiction, notably Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (commonly shortened to Alice in Wonderland) is an 1865 novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll.

Through the Looking-Glass

Alice Through the Looking GlassThrough the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found ThereThrough the Looking Glass
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English writer of world-famous children's fiction, notably Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass.
Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There (1871 ) (also known as "Alice through the Looking-Glass" or simply "Through the Looking-Glass") is a novel by Lewis Carroll and the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865).

Jabberwocky

Jabberwockgalumphingslithy
The poems Jabberwocky and The Hunting of the Snark are classified in the genre of literary nonsense.
"Jabberwocky" is a nonsense poem written by Lewis Carroll about the killing of a creature named "the Jabberwock".

The Hunting of the Snark

Snark IslandThe Hunting of the Snark. An Agony in Eight Fits
The poems Jabberwocky and The Hunting of the Snark are classified in the genre of literary nonsense. Gertrude Chataway's name appears in this form at the beginning of The Hunting of the Snark, and it is not suggested that this means that any of the characters in the narrative are based on her.
The Hunting of the Snark (An Agony in 8 Fits) is a poem written by English writer Lewis Carroll.

Pen name

nom de plumepen-namenom-de-plume
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English writer of world-famous children's fiction, notably Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass.
Similarly, an author who writes both fiction and non-fiction (such as the mathematician and fantasy writer Charles Dodgson, who wrote as Lewis Carroll) may use a pseudonym for fiction writing.

Literary nonsense

nonsensenonsensicalnonsense literature
The poems Jabberwocky and The Hunting of the Snark are classified in the genre of literary nonsense.
Lewis Carroll continued this trend, making literary nonsense a worldwide phenomenon with Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking-Glass (1871).

Charles Dodgson (priest)

Charles DodgsonCharles
The older of these sons – yet another Charles Dodgson – was Carroll's father.
He was the father of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, better known as Lewis Carroll.

Christ Church, Oxford

Christ ChurchChrist Church CollegeStudent
Carroll came from a family of high church Anglicans, and developed a long relationship with Christ Church, Oxford, where he lived for most of his life as a scholar and teacher.
Christ Church has many notable alumni including thirteen British prime ministers (more than any other Oxbridge college), King Edward VII, King William II of the Netherlands, seventeen Archbishops, writers Lewis Carroll (Alice in Wonderland) and W.H. Auden, philosopher John Locke, and scientist Robert Hooke.

Henry Liddell

LiddellLiddell, Henry GeorgeHenry George Liddell
Alice Liddell, daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, Henry Liddell, is widely identified as the original for Alice in Wonderland, though Carroll always denied this.
Lewis Carroll wrote Alice's Adventures in Wonderland for Henry Liddell's daughter Alice.

Daresbury

Daresbury Grammar SchoolDaresbury, England
Dodgson was born in the small parsonage at Daresbury in Cheshire near the towns of Warrington and Runcorn, the eldest boy but already the third child.
Daresbury was the birthplace of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland author Lewis Carroll.

George MacDonald

G. MacDonaldGeorge MacDonald (1824–1905)
He knew fairy-tale author George MacDonald well – it was the enthusiastic reception of Alice by the young MacDonald children that persuaded him to submit the work for publication.
He was a pioneering figure in the field of fantasy literature and the mentor of fellow writer Lewis Carroll.

Martin Gardner

Gardner, MartinGardnerConfessions of a Psychic: The Secret Notebooks of Uriah Fuller
Martin Gardner labels Dodgson as a Tory who was "awed by lords and inclined to be snobbish towards inferiors."
Martin Gardner (October 21, 1914 – May 22, 2010) was an American popular mathematics and popular science writer, with interests also encompassing scientific skepticism, micromagic, philosophy, religion, and literature—especially the writings of Lewis Carroll, L. Frank Baum, and G. K. Chesterton.

What the Tortoise Said to Achilles

In 1895, he developed a philosophical regressus-argument on deductive reasoning in his article "What the Tortoise Said to Achilles", which appeared in one of the early volumes of Mind.
"What the Tortoise Said to Achilles", written by Lewis Carroll in 1895 for the philosophical journal Mind, is a brief allegorical dialogue on the foundations of logic.

Alice Liddell

AliceA Boat Beneath a Sunny SkyAlice Hargreaves
He was widely assumed for many years to have derived his own "Alice" from Alice Liddell; the acrostic poem at the end of Through the Looking-Glass spells out her name in full, and there are also many superficial references to her hidden in the text of both books.
Alice Pleasance Hargreaves, née Liddell (4 May 1852 – 16 November 1934), was, in her childhood, an acquaintance and photography subject of Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson).

John Tenniel

Sir John TennielTenniel John Tenniel
The illustrations this time were by Sir John Tenniel; Dodgson evidently thought that a published book would need the skills of a professional artist.
Tenniel is remembered especially as the principal political cartoonist for Punch magazine for over 50 years, and for his illustrations to Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There (1871).

Dodo (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland)

DodoThe Dodofeatured as a character
Many children of his acquaintance remembered the stammer, while many adults failed to notice it. Dodgson himself seems to have been far more acutely aware of it than most people whom he met; it is said that he caricatured himself as the Dodo in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, referring to his difficulty in pronouncing his last name, but this is one of the many "facts" often repeated for which no first-hand evidence remains.
The Dodo is a fictional character appearing in Chapters 2 and 3 of the book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson).

Cheshire Cat

The Cheshire Catappears and disappears at willCheshire Cookie Cat
The folder was then put into a slipcase decorated with a picture of Alice on the front and the Cheshire Cat on the back.
The Cheshire Cat ( or ) is a fictional cat popularised by Lewis Carroll in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and known for its distinctive mischievous grin.

Gertrude Chataway

Gertrude Chataway's name appears in this form at the beginning of The Hunting of the Snark, and it is not suggested that this means that any of the characters in the narrative are based on her.
Gertrude Chataway (1866–1951) was the most important child-friend in the life of the author Lewis Carroll, after Alice Liddell.

Marionette

marionettesmarionettistpuppet
Sometime after 1850, he did write puppet plays for his siblings' entertainment, of which one has survived: La Guida di Bragia.
Lewis Carroll composed marionette operas and plays for his siblings' entertainment.

Cheshire

ChesterCounty of ChesterCheshire, England
Dodgson was born in the small parsonage at Daresbury in Cheshire near the towns of Warrington and Runcorn, the eldest boy but already the third child.
The county has also been home to several writers, including Hall Caine (1853–1931), popular romantic novelist and playwright; Alan Garner; Victorian novelist Elizabeth Gaskell, whose novel Cranford features her home town of Knutsford; and most famously Lewis Carroll, born and raised in Daresbury, hence the Cheshire Cat (a fictional cat popularised by Carroll in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and known for its distinctive mischievous grin).

Charles Dodgson (bishop)

Charles Dodgson
His great-grandfather, also named Charles Dodgson, had risen through the ranks of the church to become the Bishop of Elphin.
Captain Dodgson was the father of Charles Dodgson (Archdeacon of Richmond) and the grandfather of Lewis Carroll.

Mischmasch

From a young age, Dodgson wrote poetry and short stories, contributing heavily to the family magazine Mischmasch and later sending them to various magazines, enjoying moderate success.
Mischmasch is a periodical that Lewis Carroll wrote and illustrated for the amusement of his family from 1855 to 1862.

Word ladder

doublet
He appears to have invented – or at least certainly popularized – the "doublet" (see word ladder), a form of brain-teaser that is still popular today, changing one word into another by altering one letter at a time, each successive change always resulting in a genuine word.
Word ladder (also known as Doublets, word-links, change-the-word puzzles, paragrams, laddergrams, or Word golf) is a word game invented by Lewis Carroll.

Rugby School

RugbyOld Rugbeians
In 1846, Dodgson entered Rugby School where he was evidently unhappy, as he wrote some years after leaving:
There have been a number of notable including the purported father of the sport of Rugby William Webb Ellis, the inventor of Australian rules football Tom Wills, the war poets Rupert Brooke and John Gillespie Magee, Jr., Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, author and mathematician Lewis Carroll, poet and cultural critic Matthew Arnold, the author and social critic Salman Rushdie (who said of his time there: "Almost the only thing I am proud of about going to Rugby school was that Lewis Carroll went there too."

Eight or Nine Wise Words about Letter-Writing

It intended to organize stamps wherever one stored their writing utensils; Carroll expressly notes in Eight or Nine Wise Words About Letter-Writing it is not intended to be carried in a pocket or purse, as the most common individual stamps could easily be carried on their own.
Eight or Nine Wise Words about Letter-Writing is an essay by Lewis Carroll on useful tips for composing, writing, mailing, and recording letters.