Lexicon

lexicallexicallylexiconsvocabularylexicalexical accesslexical itemslexicographicallyinformal lexiconlexical entry
A lexicon, word-hoard, wordbook, or word-stock is the vocabulary of a person, language, or branch of knowledge (such as nautical or medical).wikipedia
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Dictionary

dictionariesonline dictionaryList of English dictionaries
Dictionaries represent attempts at listing, in alphabetical order, the lexicon of a given language; usually, however, bound morphemes are not included.
A dictionary, sometimes known as a wordbook, is a collection of words in one or more specific languages, often arranged alphabetically (or by radical and stroke for ideographic languages), which may include information on definitions, usage, etymologies, pronunciations, translation, etc. or a book of words in one language with their equivalents in another, sometimes known as a lexicon.

Linguistics

linguistlinguisticlinguists
In linguistics, a lexicon is a language's inventory of lexemes.
There may be certain lexical additions (new words) that are brought into play because of the expertise of the community of people within a certain domain of specialization.

Language

languageslinguisticlinguistic diversity
A lexicon, word-hoard, wordbook, or word-stock is the vocabulary of a person, language, or branch of knowledge (such as nautical or medical).
In a language, the array of arbitrary signs connected to specific meanings is called the lexicon, and a single sign connected to a meaning is called a lexeme.

Lexicalization

lexicalizedlexicalisationborrowing, and lexical and grammatical shifts
Lexicalization is the process by which new words, having gained widespread usage, enter the lexicon.
Lexicalization is the process of adding words, set phrases, or word patterns to a language – that is, of adding items to a language's lexicon.

Collocation

collocationscollocatedcollocate
In some analyses, compound words and certain classes of idiomatic expressions and other collocations are also considered to be part of the lexicon.
Collocations can be in a syntactic relation (such as verb–object: 'make' and 'decision'), lexical relation (such as antonymy), or they can be in no linguistically defined relation.

Pragmatics

pragmaticpragmaticallylinguistic pragmatics
They can be interpreted through analogy, common sense and, most commonly, context. When linguists study a lexicon, they consider such things as what constitutes a word; the word/concept relationship; lexical access and lexical access failure; how a word's phonology, syntax, and meaning intersect; the morphology-word relationship; vocabulary structure within a given language; language use (pragmatics); language acquisition; the history and evolution of words (etymology); and the relationships between words, often studied within philosophy of language.
Unlike semantics, which examines meaning that is conventional or "coded" in a given language, pragmatics studies how the transmission of meaning depends not only on structural and linguistic knowledge (grammar, lexicon, etc.) of the speaker and listener but also on the context of the utterance, any pre-existing knowledge about those involved, the inferred intent of the speaker, and other factors.

European Portuguese

EuropeanPortuguese (Europe) Portuguese
Speakers of language variants (Brazilian Portuguese and European Portuguese, for example) may be considered to possess a single lexicon.
Portuguese and Spanish are different languages, although they share 89% of their lexicon.

Psycholinguistics

psycholinguisticpsycholinguistpsychology of language
Various models of how lexicons are organized and how words are retrieved have been proposed in psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics and computational linguistics.
Psycholinguistics is concerned with the cognitive faculties and processes that are necessary in order for grammatical forms of language to be produced from a mental grammar and the lexicon.

Lexical Markup Framework

LMFISO 24613ISO standard Lexical Markup Framework (LMF)
Language resource management - Lexical markup framework (LMF; ISO 24613:2008), is the ISO International Organization for Standardization ISO/TC37 standard for natural language processing (NLP) and machine-readable dictionary (MRD) lexicons.

Transitive verb

transitivetransitive verbstransitivity
For example, the suffix "-able" is usually only added to transitive verbs, as in "readable" but not "cryable".
Traditionally, transitivity patterns are thought of as lexical information of the verb, but recent research in construction grammar and related theories has argued that transitivity is a grammatical rather than a lexical property, since the same verb very often appears with different transitivity in different contexts.

Computational linguistics

mathematical linguisticscomputational linguistSymbolic Systems
Various models of how lexicons are organized and how words are retrieved have been proposed in psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics and computational linguistics.
To understand syntax, one had to also understand the semantics and the lexicon (or 'vocabulary'), and even something of the pragmatics of language use.

Neurolinguistics

neurolinguisticNeurocognitive Linguisticsneurolinguists
Various models of how lexicons are organized and how words are retrieved have been proposed in psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics and computational linguistics.

Etymology

etymologicaletymologicallyetymologies
When linguists study a lexicon, they consider such things as what constitutes a word; the word/concept relationship; lexical access and lexical access failure; how a word's phonology, syntax, and meaning intersect; the morphology-word relationship; vocabulary structure within a given language; language use (pragmatics); language acquisition; the history and evolution of words (etymology); and the relationships between words, often studied within philosophy of language.
The first known systematic attempt to prove the relationship between two languages on the basis of similarity of grammar and lexicon was made in 1770 by the Hungarian, János Sajnovics, when he attempted to demonstrate the relationship between Sami and Hungarian (work that was later extended to the whole Finno-Ugric language family in 1799 by his fellow countryman, Samuel Gyarmathi).

Morphology (linguistics)

morphologymorphologicalmorphologically
When linguists study a lexicon, they consider such things as what constitutes a word; the word/concept relationship; lexical access and lexical access failure; how a word's phonology, syntax, and meaning intersect; the morphology-word relationship; vocabulary structure within a given language; language use (pragmatics); language acquisition; the history and evolution of words (etymology); and the relationships between words, often studied within philosophy of language.
Lexical morphology is the branch of morphology that deals with the lexicon, which, morphologically conceived, is the collection of lexemes in a language.

Vocabulary

vocabularieslexicalactive vocabulary
A lexicon, word-hoard, wordbook, or word-stock is the vocabulary of a person, language, or branch of knowledge (such as nautical or medical).

Knowledge

knowhuman knowledgesituated knowledge
A lexicon, word-hoard, wordbook, or word-stock is the vocabulary of a person, language, or branch of knowledge (such as nautical or medical).

Navigation

nauticalnavigatenavigational
A lexicon, word-hoard, wordbook, or word-stock is the vocabulary of a person, language, or branch of knowledge (such as nautical or medical).

Medicine

medicalmedical scienceclinical medicine
A lexicon, word-hoard, wordbook, or word-stock is the vocabulary of a person, language, or branch of knowledge (such as nautical or medical).

Lexeme

lexemeslexicallexical root
In linguistics, a lexicon is a language's inventory of lexemes.

Greek language

GreekAncient GreekModern Greek
The word "lexicon" derives from the Greek λεξικόν (lexicon), neuter of λεξικός (lexikos) meaning "of or for words."

Grammar

grammaticalgrammaticallyrules of language
Linguistic theories generally regard human languages as consisting of two parts: a lexicon, essentially a catalogue of a language's words (its wordstock); and a grammar, a system of rules which allow for the combination of those words into meaningful sentences.

Bound and free morphemes

bound morphemefree morphemebound
The lexicon is also thought to include bound morphemes, which cannot stand alone as words (such as most affixes).

Affix

suffixaffixesaffixation
The lexicon is also thought to include bound morphemes, which cannot stand alone as words (such as most affixes).