Liberal Democrats (UK)

Liberal DemocratsLiberal DemocratLib DemLib DemsLDLiberal Democrat PartySLDSocial and Liberal DemocratsL.D.LibDem
The Liberal Democrats (often referred to as the Lib Dems) are a liberal British political party formed in 1988 from a merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party (SDP), a splinter group from the Labour Party which had formed the SDP–Liberal Alliance from 1981.wikipedia
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Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
At the 2010 general election, the Lib Dems led by Nick Clegg won 57 seats, making them the third-largest party in the House of Commons behind the Conservatives with 306 and Labour with 258.
It is currently the governing party, having been so since the 2010 general election, where a coalition government with the Liberal Democrats was formed.

2010 United Kingdom general election

2010 general election20102010 election
At the 2010 general election, the Lib Dems led by Nick Clegg won 57 seats, making them the third-largest party in the House of Commons behind the Conservatives with 306 and Labour with 258.
Coalition talks began immediately between the Conservatives and the Liberal Democrats, and lasted for five days.

List of United Kingdom Liberal Democrat MPs (2015–17)

eight Members of Parliamenteight MPsfemale Liberal Democrat MP
At the 2015 general election, the Liberal Democrats were reduced to eight MPs and became the fourth largest party in the House of Commons, behind the SNP leading to Nick Clegg's resignation.
Eight Liberal Democrat Members of Parliament (MPs) were elected to the House of Commons of the United Kingdom at the 2015 general election.

2015 United Kingdom general election

2015 general election20152015 UK general election
At the 2015 general election, the Liberal Democrats were reduced to eight MPs and became the fourth largest party in the House of Commons, behind the SNP leading to Nick Clegg's resignation.
Having governed in coalition with the Liberal Democrats since 2010, the Conservatives won 330 seats and 36.9% of the vote, this time winning a working majority of twelve seats.

Nick Clegg

CleggNick Clegg MPCleggmania
At the 2010 general election, the Lib Dems led by Nick Clegg won 57 seats, making them the third-largest party in the House of Commons behind the Conservatives with 306 and Labour with 258.
After his election to the House of Commons in 2005, Clegg served in a variety of leadership roles in the Liberal Democrats, most notably as Spokesperson for Home Affairs, before being elected to succeed Menzies Campbell as party leader in 2007.

List of United Kingdom Liberal Democrat MPs (2017–)

current Liberal Democrat MPstwelve MPs
At the 2017 general election, the party returned twelve MPs, becoming the third-largest UK-wide party in terms of votes cast but remaining fourth largest by number of MPs.
Twelve Liberal Democrat Members of Parliament (MPs) were elected to the House of Commons of the United Kingdom at the 2017 general election.

Tim Farron

Tim Farron MPFarronTim '''Farron
Sir Vince Cable succeeded Tim Farron as party leader.
Timothy James Farron (born 27 May 1970) is a British politician who was the Leader of the Liberal Democrats between July 2015 and July 2017.

2017 United Kingdom general election

2017 general election20172017 UK general election
At the 2017 general election, the party returned twelve MPs, becoming the third-largest UK-wide party in terms of votes cast but remaining fourth largest by number of MPs.
The Scottish National Party (SNP) and the Liberal Democrats, the third- and fourth-largest parties, both lost vote share; media coverage characterised the election as a return to two-party politics.

Roy Jenkins

The Lord Jenkins of HillheadLord JenkinsRoy Jenkins, Baron Jenkins of Hillhead
The Alliance was led by David Steel (Liberal) and Roy Jenkins (SDP); Jenkins was replaced by David Owen.
Roy Harris Jenkins, Baron Jenkins of Hillhead, (11 November 1920 – 5 January 2003) was a British Labour Party, SDP and Liberal Democrat politician, and biographer of British political leaders.

Social Democratic Party (UK)

Social Democratic PartySDPSocial Democrat
The Liberal Democrats (often referred to as the Lib Dems) are a liberal British political party formed in 1988 from a merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party (SDP), a splinter group from the Labour Party which had formed the SDP–Liberal Alliance from 1981.
The party merged with the Liberal Party in 1988 to form the Social and Liberal Democrats, now the Liberal Democrats, although a minority left to form a continuing SDP led by David Owen.

SDP–Liberal Alliance

AllianceLiberal-SDP AllianceSDP–Lib
The Liberal Democrats (often referred to as the Lib Dems) are a liberal British political party formed in 1988 from a merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party (SDP), a splinter group from the Labour Party which had formed the SDP–Liberal Alliance from 1981.
The Alliance ceased to exist in 1988, when the two component parties merged to form the Social and Liberal Democrats, later renamed the Liberal Democrats.

1983 United Kingdom general election

19831983 general election1983 election
The two parties had their own policies and emphases, but produced a joint manifesto for the 1983 and 1987 general elections.
Changing the electoral system had been a long-running Liberal Party campaign plank and would later be adopted by the Liberal Democrats.

Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
The Liberal Democrats (often referred to as the Lib Dems) are a liberal British political party formed in 1988 from a merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party (SDP), a splinter group from the Labour Party which had formed the SDP–Liberal Alliance from 1981.
At the 1987 general election, its share of the vote fell below 23% and the Liberal and Social Democratic parties merged in 1988 to form the Liberal Democrats.

Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Deputy Prime MinisterShadow Deputy Prime MinisterBritish Deputy Prime Minister
With no party having an overall majority, the party formed a coalition government with the Conservatives, with Clegg becoming Deputy Prime Minister and others taking up ministerial positions.
In a coalition government, such as the 2010–2015 coalition government between the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats, the appointment of the leader of the smaller party (in the 2010 case, Nick Clegg, leader of the Liberal Democrats) as Deputy Prime Minister is done to give that person more authority within the Cabinet to enforce the coalition's agreed-upon agenda.

1987 United Kingdom general election

19871987 general election1987 election
The two parties had their own policies and emphases, but produced a joint manifesto for the 1983 and 1987 general elections.
This led to the two parties eventually merging completely to become the Liberal Democrats.

Liberal Party (UK, 1989)

Liberal PartyLiberalLiberals
The minority of the SDP who rejected the merger remained under Owen's leadership in a rump SDP; the minority of the Liberal Party divided, with some retiring from politics immediately and others (led by former Liberal MP Michael Meadowcroft) creating a new 'Liberal Party' that claimed to be the continuation of the Liberal Party which had just dissolved itself.
The Liberal Party (Plaid Ryddfrydol) is a British political party that was founded in 1989 by members of the original Liberal Party opposed to its merger with the Social Democratic Party (SDP) to form the Liberal Democrats.

Charles Kennedy

Charles Kennedy MPCharlie KennedyKennedy
Ashdown retired as leader in 1999 and the party elected Charles Kennedy as his replacement.
Charles Peter Kennedy (25 November 1959 – 1 June 2015) was a Scottish Liberal Democrat politician who was Leader of the Liberal Democrats from 1999 to 2006, and a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1983 to 2015, latterly for the Ross, Skye and Lochaber constituency.

1997 United Kingdom general election

1997 general election19971997 election
This Lib-Lab pact failed to form because Labour's massive majority after the 1997 general election made it an irrelevance for Labour, and because Labour were not prepared to consider the introduction of proportional representation and other Lib Dem conditions.
The Liberal Democrats, under Paddy Ashdown, returned 46 MPs to parliament, the most for any third party since 1929 and more than double the number of seats it got in 1992, despite a drop in popular vote, in part due to tactical voting by anti-Conservative voters supporting it in lieu of Labour in areas where that party had little strength.

Scottish National Party

SNP SNP Scottish National
At the 2015 general election, the Liberal Democrats were reduced to eight MPs and became the fourth largest party in the House of Commons, behind the SNP leading to Nick Clegg's resignation.
Since 18 September 2014 (the day of the Scottish independence referendum), party membership has more than quadrupled (from 25,642), surpassing the Liberal Democrats and Conservatives to become the second-largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of membership.

1994 European Parliament election in the United Kingdom

19941994 European Parliament election1994 election
In the 1994 European Elections, the party gained its first two Members of European Parliament.
This was the first European election contested by the recently formed UK Independence Party and the first European election in which the Liberal Democrats won seats.

2005 United Kingdom general election

2005 general election20052005 election
At the 2005 general election, the Lib Dems gained their highest share of the vote since the SDP–Liberal Alliance (22%) and won 62 seats.
The Liberal Democrats, led by Charles Kennedy, were opposed to the Iraq War, given that there had been no second UN resolution, and collected votes from disenchanted Labour voters.

Liberal International

LIPresident of the Liberal Internationalfull member of Liberal International
The party is a member of the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe and Liberal International.

2001 United Kingdom general election

2001 general election20012001 election
The party improved on their 1997 results at the 2001 general election, increasing their number of seats to 52 and their share of the vote to 18.3%.
The Liberal Democrats gained six seats.

Menzies Campbell

Sir Menzies CampbellThe Lord Campbell of PittenweemWalter Menzies Campbell
In a statement on 5 January 2006 Charles Kennedy admitted to a long battle with alcoholism and announced a leadership election in which he intended to stand for re-election, while Sir Menzies Campbell took over as acting leader.
Walter Menzies Campbell, Baron Campbell of Pittenweem, (born 22 May 1941), often known as Ming Campbell, is a British Liberal Democrat politician, advocate and former athlete.

1992 United Kingdom general election

1992 general election19921992 election
At their first election in 1992 (which ended in a fourth successive Conservative win), they won 17.8% of the vote and twenty seats.
This was the first general election for the newly formed Liberal Democrats, a party formed by the formal merger of the SDP-Liberal Alliance.