Liberal Party (Hong Kong)

First logo used from 1993 to 2004
Second logo used from 2003 to 2011

Pro-Beijing, pro-business, and conservative political party in Hong Kong.

- Liberal Party (Hong Kong)

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District councils of Hong Kong

The district councils, formerly district boards until 1999, are the local councils for the 18 districts of Hong Kong.

Map of district councils

These included 41 from various political parties, namely the Liberal Party, the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong (DAB), and the Hong Kong Progressive Alliance.

James Tien (politician)

James Tien in the 2016 Legislative Council election

James Tien Pei-chun, GBS, OBE, JP (born 8 January 1947) is the former Chairman and Leader of the Liberal Party (LP) and former member of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (Legco).

Legislative Council of Hong Kong

Unicameral legislature of Hong Kong.

The Legislative Council Building (1985–2011)
Central Government Offices, home to Legco from the 1950s to 1985
The French Mission Building housed LegCo in the 1840s
Andrew Leung, the incumbent President of the Legislative Council.
Vote share of the Legislative Council elections by party since 1991.
Seating plan of the Legislative Council.

Due to the indirectly elected trade-based functional constituencies which largely favour business interests — represented by the Liberal Party and subsequently the Business and Professionals Alliance for Hong Kong (BPA) — the pro-Beijing camp has been able to keep the majority in the legislature despite receiving fewer votes than the pro-democracy bloc in the direct elections.

2008 Hong Kong legislative election

Held on 7 September 2008 for the 4th Legislative Council since the establishment of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

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Results of the election: the party with the plurality of votes by each polling station.
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Ring charts of the election results showing popular vote against seats won, coloured in green (Pro-democracy camp) and red (Pro-Beijing camp) on the left and the party colours on the right. Seats won in the election (outer ring) against number of votes (inner ring).

The Democratic Alliance for the Betterment of Hong Kong (DAB) remained the largest single party in the Legislative Council with 13 seats if including the two members of the Hong Kong Federation of Trade Unions (FTU) while the pro-business Liberal Party suffered a big defeat by losing the two heavyweights, chairman James Tien and vice-chairwoman Selina Chow lost their seats in the New Territories East and the New Territories West.

2016 Hong Kong legislative election

Held on 4 September 2016 for the 6th Legislative Council of Hong Kong .

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Pro-democrats' results in 18 districts.
Pro-Beijing camp's results in 18 districts.

Many veteran pro-Beijing incumbents, including the LegCo president Jasper Tsang, also Chan Kam-lam and Tam Yiu-chung of the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong's (DAB) and Chan Yuen-han of the Hong Kong Federation of Trade Unions (FTU) decided to step down, while pan-democrat heavyweights, including Civic Party leader Alan Leong, Democratic Party chairwoman Emily Lau and veterans Albert Ho and Sin Chung-kai, as well as pro-Beijing Liberal Party honorary chairman James Tien, chose to stand as second candidate to get their party's newcomers elected.

Pro-Beijing camp (Hong Kong)

The pro-Beijing camp, pro-establishment camp, pro-government camp or pro-China camp refers to a political alignment in Hong Kong which generally supports the policies of the Beijing central government and the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) towards Hong Kong.

To counter the pro-democracy influence in the legislature, the British-appointed unofficial members of the Legislative Council launched the Co-operative Resources Centre (CRC) in 1991 which transformed into the pro-business conservative Liberal Party in 1993, becoming the arch rival of the United Democrats.

Hong Kong Basic Law Article 23

Article in the Basic Law of Hong Kong.

The cover of the Basic Law, published by the Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Bureau

In the aftermath, Liberal Party chairman James Tien resigned from the Executive Council and the bill was withdrawn after it became clear that it would not get the necessary support from the Legislative Council for it to be passed.

1994 Hong Kong electoral reform

Set of significant constitutional changes in the last years of British colonial rule in Hong Kong before the handover of its sovereignty to the People's Republic of China on 1 July 1997.

The Old Supreme Court Building was the home of the Legislative Council in the final years of the colonial period.
Chris Patten, the last Governor of Hong Kong who took the leading role in the electoral reform.
Martin Lee, leader of the pro-democracy camp and supporter of the electoral reform.
Allen Lee, the leader of the Liberal Party, was the major opponent to the reform proposals in the Legislative Council.

The bill secured a dramatic narrow passage after surviving Liberal Party Allen Lee's hostile amendment by one vote 29 to 28 and was eventually passed with the support of the pro-democracy camp.

2004 Hong Kong legislative election

Held on 12 September 2004 for members of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong .

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Ring charts of the election results showing popular vote against seats won, coloured in green (Pro-democracy camp) and red (Pro-Beijing camp) on the left and the party colours on the right. Seats won in the election (outer ring) against number of votes (inner ring).

Despite the increase in the number of seats returned by geographical constituencies and the record turnout, the Democratic Party lost the status of being the largest political party in the Legislative Council to the pro-government Democratic Alliance for Betterment of Hong Kong, DAB, who secured 12 seats if including the two members who ran under the banner of the Hong Kong Federation of Trade Unions, and pro-business Liberal Party who secured 10 seats, thereby becoming only the third-largest party.

Felix Chung

Felix Chung in 2020
Chung in 2015

Felix Chung Kwok-pan (, born 4 November 1963) is a former member of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong for the Textiles and Garment constituency, representing the Liberal Party.