Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberalsBritish Liberal PartyCoalition LiberalLibBritish LiberalLiberal politicianLeader of the Liberal PartyUK Liberal Party
The Liberal Party was one of the two major parties in the United Kingdom with the opposing Conservative Party in the 19th and early 20th centuries.wikipedia
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List of political parties in the United Kingdom

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The Liberal Party was one of the two major parties in the United Kingdom with the opposing Conservative Party in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
By the mid 19th century, the Tories had evolved into the Conservative Party, and the Whigs had evolved into the Liberal Party.

William Ewart Gladstone

GladstoneWilliam GladstoneW. E. Gladstone
By the end of the 19th century, it had formed four governments under William Gladstone.
William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British statesman and Liberal Party politician.

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
The Liberal Party was one of the two major parties in the United Kingdom with the opposing Conservative Party in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
The Conservative Party was founded in 1834 from the Tory Party—giving rise to the Conservatives' colloquial name of Tories—and was one of two dominant political parties in the nineteenth century, along with the Liberal Party.

H. H. Asquith

AsquithAsquithianHerbert Henry Asquith
Under Prime Ministers Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman (1905–1908) and H. H. Asquith (1908–1916), the Liberal Party passed the welfare reforms that created a basic British welfare state.
Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith, (12 September 1852 – 15 February 1928), generally known as H. H. Asquith, was a British statesman and Liberal Party politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916.

1906 United Kingdom general election

19061906 general election1906 election
Despite being divided over the issue of Irish Home Rule, the party returned to government in 1905 and then won a landslide victory in the following year's general election.
The Liberals, led by Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman, won a landslide majority at the election.

David Lloyd George

Lloyd GeorgeRt Hon. David Lloyd GeorgeBritish Prime Minister David Lloyd George
Although Asquith was the party's leader, its dominant figure was David Lloyd George.
David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor, (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman and Liberal Party politician.

Radicals (UK)

RadicalRadicalsEnglish Radical
The party arose from an alliance of Whigs and free trade Peelites and Radicals favourable to the ideals of the American and French Revolutions in the 1850s.
The Radicals were a loose parliamentary political grouping in Great Britain and Ireland in the early to mid-19th century, who drew on earlier ideas of radicalism and helped to transform the Whigs into the Liberal Party.

Lloyd George ministry

coalition governmentCoalitionCoalition Liberal
The government of Lloyd George was dominated by the Conservative Party, which finally deposed him in 1922.
Those Liberals who continued to support Asquith served as the Official Opposition.

Labour Party (UK)

Labour PartyLabourBritish Labour Party
By the end of the 1920s, the Labour Party had replaced the Liberals as the Conservatives' main rival.
It overtook the Liberal Party to become the main opposition to the Conservative Party in the early 1920s, forming minority governments under Ramsay MacDonald in 1924 and from 1929 to 1931.

Peelite

Liberal ConservativesPeelite ConservativePeelite Conservatives
The party arose from an alliance of Whigs and free trade Peelites and Radicals favourable to the ideals of the American and French Revolutions in the 1850s.
The Peelites were a breakaway dissident political faction of the British Conservative Party from 1846 to 1859 who joined with the Whigs and Radicals to form the Liberal Party.

Asquith coalition ministry

Asquith Coalitioncoalition governmentCoalition
Asquith was overwhelmed by the wartime role of coalition Prime Minister and Lloyd George replaced him as Prime Minister in late 1916, but Asquith remained as Liberal Party leader.

1983 United Kingdom general election

19831983 general election1983 election
At the 1983 general election, the Alliance won over a quarter of the vote, but only 23 of the 650 seats it contested.
Several moderate Labour MPs had defected from the party to form the Social Democratic Party (SDP); they then formed the SDP–Liberal Alliance with the existing Liberal Party.

Liberal Party (UK, 1989)

Liberal PartyLiberalLiberals
A splinter group reconstituted the Liberal Party in 1989.
The Liberal Party (Plaid Ryddfrydol) is a British political party that was founded in 1989 by members of the original Liberal Party opposed to its merger with the Social Democratic Party (SDP) to form the Liberal Democrats.

Liberal Democrats (UK)

Liberal DemocratsLiberal DemocratLib Dem
At the 1987 general election, its share of the vote fell below 23% and the Liberal and Social Democratic parties merged in 1988 to form the Liberal Democrats.
The Liberal Democrats (often referred to as the Lib Dems) are a liberal British political party formed in 1988 from a merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party (SDP), a splinter group from the Labour Party which had formed the SDP–Liberal Alliance from 1981.

1987 United Kingdom general election

19871987 general election1987 election
At the 1987 general election, its share of the vote fell below 23% and the Liberal and Social Democratic parties merged in 1988 to form the Liberal Democrats.
The Alliance between the SDP and the Liberal Party was renewed but co-leaders David Owen and David Steel could not agree whether to support either major party in the event of a hung parliament.

SDP–Liberal Alliance

AllianceLiberal-SDP AllianceSDP–Lib
Apart from notable by-election victories, its fortunes did not improve significantly until it formed the SDP–Liberal Alliance with the newly formed Social Democratic Party (SDP) in 1981.
Formed by the Social Democratic Party (SDP) and the Liberal Party, the Alliance was established in 1981, contesting the 1983 general election, 1984 European election and 1987 general election.

John Stuart Mill

MillJ. S. MillJS Mill
Prominent intellectuals associated with the Liberal Party include the philosopher John Stuart Mill, the economist John Maynard Keynes and social planner William Beveridge.
A member of the Liberal Party, he was also the second Member of Parliament to call for women's suffrage after Henry Hunt in 1832.

Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston

Lord PalmerstonPalmerstonThe Viscount Palmerston
In the years after Grey's retirement, the party was led first by Lord Melbourne, a fairly traditional Whig, and then by Lord John Russell, the son of a Duke but a crusading radical, and by Lord Palmerston, a renegade Irish Tory and essentially a conservative, although capable of radical gestures.
He began his parliamentary career as a Tory, defected to the Whigs in 1830, and became the first Prime Minister of the newly formed Liberal Party in 1859.

John Russell, 1st Earl Russell

Lord John RussellLord RussellJohn Russell
In the years after Grey's retirement, the party was led first by Lord Melbourne, a fairly traditional Whig, and then by Lord John Russell, the son of a Duke but a crusading radical, and by Lord Palmerston, a renegade Irish Tory and essentially a conservative, although capable of radical gestures.
John Russell, 1st Earl Russell, (18 August 1792 – 28 May 1878), known by his courtesy title Lord John Russell before 1861, was a leading Whig and Liberal politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on two occasions during the early Victorian era.

John Bright

BrightJohn Bright MPJ. Bright
The leading Radicals were John Bright and Richard Cobden, who represented the manufacturing towns which had gained representation under the Reform Act.
John Bright (16 November 1811 – 27 March 1889) was a British Radical and Liberal statesman, one of the greatest orators of his generation and a promoter of free trade policies.

Richard Cobden

CobdenRichard Cobden MP
The leading Radicals were John Bright and Richard Cobden, who represented the manufacturing towns which had gained representation under the Reform Act.
Richard Cobden (3 June 1804 – 2 April 1865) was an English manufacturer and Radical and Liberal statesman, associated with two major free trade campaigns, the Anti-Corn Law League and the Cobden–Chevalier Treaty.

Social Democratic Party (UK)

Social Democratic PartySDPSocial Democrat
Apart from notable by-election victories, its fortunes did not improve significantly until it formed the SDP–Liberal Alliance with the newly formed Social Democratic Party (SDP) in 1981.
For the 1983 and 1987 General Elections, the SDP formed a political and electoral alliance with the Liberal Party, the SDP–Liberal Alliance.

National Liberal Federation

NLF
The establishment of the party as a national membership organisation came with the foundation of the National Liberal Federation in 1877.
The National Liberal Federation (1877–1936) was the union of all English and Welsh (but not Scottish) Liberal Associations.

Benjamin Disraeli

DisraeliLord BeaconsfieldBeaconsfield
In the 1874 general election Gladstone was defeated by the Conservatives under Benjamin Disraeli during a sharp economic recession.
Disraeli is remembered for his influential voice in world affairs, his political battles with the Liberal Party leader William Ewart Gladstone, and his one-nation conservatism or "Tory democracy".

Elementary Education Act 1870

1870 Education ActEducation ActEducation Act of 1870
One major achievement was the Elementary Education Act of 1870, which provided England with an adequate system of elementary schools for the first time.
The law was drafted by William Forster, a Liberal MP, and it was introduced on 17 February 1870 after campaigning by the National Education League, although not entirely to their requirements.