Liberalism in the United States

liberalliberalsliberalismAmerican liberalismAmerican liberalAmerican liberalsLiberal CaucusPaleoliberalismliberal-leaningpolitically liberal
Liberalism in the United States is a broad political philosophy centered on what many see as the unalienable rights of the individual.wikipedia
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Modern liberalism in the United States

liberalliberalsLiberalism
Modern liberalism in the United States includes issues such as same-sex marriage, reproductive and other women's rights, voting rights for all adult citizens, civil rights, environmental justice and government protection of freedom from want.
Modern liberalism in the United States is the dominant version of liberalism in the United States.

Liberalism

liberalliberalssocially liberal
The fundamental liberal ideals of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion for all belief systems and the separation of church and state, right to due process and equality under the law are widely accepted as a common foundation across the spectrum of liberal thought.
The 19th century saw liberal governments established in nations across Europe and South America, whereas it was well-established alongside republicanism in the United States.

Libertarianism in the United States

libertarianlibertarianslibertarianism
Some American liberals, who call themselves classical liberals, fiscal conservatives, or libertarians, support fundamental liberal ideals, but diverge from modern liberal thought, holding that economic freedom is more important than equality and that providing for the general welfare exceeds the legitimate role of government.
There are two principal traditions within libertarianism, namely the libertarianism developed by anarcho-capitalist author Murray Rothbard, who based it off out of 19th-century libertarianism and American individualist anarchists such as Benjamin Tucker and Lysander Spooner while rejecting their labor theory of value, substituting it with Austrian School economics and the subjective theory of value; and the libertarianism that developed as a revival of classical liberalism in the United States after liberalism became associated with the New Deal, including politicians like David Nolan and Ron Paul.

Liberalism by country

List of liberal partiesLiberalism worldwideliberal party
According to Louis Hartz, liberalism in the United States differs from liberalism elsewhere in the world because the United States never had a resident hereditary aristocracy and as such avoided much of the class warfare that swept Europe.
In the United States, the two major political forces, the Republican Party and the Democratic Party, are to some extent, liberal (see Liberalism in the United States and Modern liberalism in the United States).

Social liberalism

social liberalsocial-liberalliberal
It is a form of social liberalism, whose accomplishments include the Works Progress Administration and the Social Security Act in 1935, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
In the United States, the term social liberalism was used to differentiate it from classical liberalism or laissez-faire, which dominated political and economic thought for a number of years until the term branched off from it around the Great Depression and the New Deal.

Age of Enlightenment

Enlightenmentthe EnlightenmentFrench Enlightenment
The origins of American liberalism lie in the political ideals of the Age of Enlightenment.
During the Enlightenment there was a great emphasis upon liberty, republicanism and religious tolerance.

Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic Party
Freedom from want could justify positive government action to meet economic needs, an idea more associated with the concepts of Abraham Lincoln's Republican Party, Henry Clay's Whig Party and Alexander Hamilton's economic principles of government intervention and subsidy than the more radical socialism and social democracy of European thinkers, or with prior versions of classical liberalism as represented by Thomas Jefferson's Democratic-Republican Party and Andrew Jackson's Democratic Party.
The economically activist philosophy of Franklin D. Roosevelt, which has strongly influenced American liberalism, shaped much of the party's economic agenda after 1932.

New Deal

The New DealHundred Days Congressfirst hundred days
Since the 1930s, the term liberalism (without a qualifier) usually refers in the United States to modern liberalism, a political philosophy exemplified by Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal and later Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society.

Republican Party (United States)

RepublicanRepublican PartyR
Freedom from want could justify positive government action to meet economic needs, an idea more associated with the concepts of Abraham Lincoln's Republican Party, Henry Clay's Whig Party and Alexander Hamilton's economic principles of government intervention and subsidy than the more radical socialism and social democracy of European thinkers, or with prior versions of classical liberalism as represented by Thomas Jefferson's Democratic-Republican Party and Andrew Jackson's Democratic Party.
In 2018, Gallup polling found that 69% of Republicans described themselves as "conservative", while 25% opted for the term "moderate" and another 5% self-identified as "liberal".

The New Republic

New RepublicBruce BlivenJoshua Kurlantzick
He effectively combined classical liberal theory with progressive philosophy and founded the periodical The New Republic to present his ideas.
The magazine's politics were liberal and progressive, and as such concerned with coping with the great changes brought about by middle-class reform efforts designed to remedy the weaknesses in America's changing economy and society.

Four Freedoms

Four Freedoms speech1941 State of the Union Addressfour essential freedoms
The essential tenets of Cold War liberalism can be found in Roosevelt's Four Freedoms (1941).

George McGovern

George S. McGovernMcGovernMcGovern, George
While the civil rights movement isolated liberals from the working class and Southern Democrats, the Vietnam War threw another wedge into the liberal ranks, dividing pro-war "hawks" such as Senator Henry M. Jackson from "doves" such as Senator and 1972 presidential candidate George McGovern.
Nevertheless, he refused to believe that American liberalism was dead in the time of Reagan; remaining active in politics, in January 1981 he founded the political organization Americans for Common Sense.

Laissez-faire

laissez fairelaissez-faire capitalismlaissez-faire economics
Classical liberalism in the United States, also called laissez-faire liberalism, is the belief that a free-market economy is the most productive.
Historian Kathleen G. Donohue argues that in the 19th century liberalism in the United States had distinctive characteristics and that "at the center of classical liberal theory [in Europe] was the idea of laissez-faire. To the vast majority of American classical liberals, however, laissez-faire did not mean "no government intervention" at all. On the contrary, they were more than willing to see government provide tariffs, railroad subsidies, and internal improvements, all of which benefited producers".

Robert F. Kennedy

Robert KennedyBobby KennedyRobert
After Johnson refused to run again, assassination removed Robert F. Kennedy from contention and noted liberal Vice President Hubert Humphrey emerged from the disastrous 1968 Democratic National Convention with the presidential nomination of a deeply divided party.
Kennedy's (and to a lesser extent his older brother's) ideas about using government authority to assist less fortunate peoples became central to American liberalism as a tenet of the "Kennedy legacy".

Political philosophy

political theorypolitical philosopherpolitical theorist
Liberalism in the United States is a broad political philosophy centered on what many see as the unalienable rights of the individual.

Natural rights and legal rights

natural rightslegal rightsnatural right
Liberalism in the United States is a broad political philosophy centered on what many see as the unalienable rights of the individual.

Individual

individualityindividualshuman identity
Liberalism in the United States is a broad political philosophy centered on what many see as the unalienable rights of the individual.

Freedom of speech

free speechfreedom of expressionfree expression
The fundamental liberal ideals of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion for all belief systems and the separation of church and state, right to due process and equality under the law are widely accepted as a common foundation across the spectrum of liberal thought.

Freedom of the press

press freedompressfreedom of press
The fundamental liberal ideals of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion for all belief systems and the separation of church and state, right to due process and equality under the law are widely accepted as a common foundation across the spectrum of liberal thought.

Freedom of religion

religious freedomreligious libertyfreedom of worship
The fundamental liberal ideals of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion for all belief systems and the separation of church and state, right to due process and equality under the law are widely accepted as a common foundation across the spectrum of liberal thought.

Separation of church and state

disestablishmentchurch and stateseparation of religion and state
The fundamental liberal ideals of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion for all belief systems and the separation of church and state, right to due process and equality under the law are widely accepted as a common foundation across the spectrum of liberal thought.

Due process

due process of lawDue Process Clausejudicial procedure
The fundamental liberal ideals of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion for all belief systems and the separation of church and state, right to due process and equality under the law are widely accepted as a common foundation across the spectrum of liberal thought.

Equality before the law

equalityequal rightsequality under the law
The fundamental liberal ideals of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion for all belief systems and the separation of church and state, right to due process and equality under the law are widely accepted as a common foundation across the spectrum of liberal thought.

Same-sex marriage in the United States

same-sex marriageUnited Statesgay marriage
Modern liberalism in the United States includes issues such as same-sex marriage, reproductive and other women's rights, voting rights for all adult citizens, civil rights, environmental justice and government protection of freedom from want.