Liberalism in the United States

liberalliberalsliberalismAmerican liberalismAmerican liberalsLiberal CaucusAmerican liberalliberal-leaningpolitically liberalleft
Liberalism in the United States is a broad political philosophy centered on what many see as the unalienable rights of the individual.wikipedia
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Liberalism

liberalliberalssocially liberal
The fundamental liberal ideals of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion for all belief systems, and the separation of church and state, right to due process, and equality under the law are widely accepted as a common foundation across the spectrum of liberal thought.
The 19th century saw liberal governments established in nations across Europe and South America, whereas it was well-established alongside republicanism in the United States.

Social liberalism

social liberalsocial-liberalliberal
Some American liberals, who call themselves classical liberals, fiscal conservatives, or libertarians, support fundamental liberal ideals but disagree with modern liberal thought, holding that economic freedom is more important than equality, and that providing for the general welfare exceeds the legitimate role of government.
Social liberalism (also known as modern liberalism in the United States, and "left liberalisn" in Germany) is a political ideology and a variety of liberalism that endorses a regulated free market economy and the expansion of civil and political rights.

Libertarianism

libertarianlibertarianslibertarian state
Some American liberals, who call themselves classical liberals, fiscal conservatives, or libertarians, support fundamental liberal ideals but disagree with modern liberal thought, holding that economic freedom is more important than equality, and that providing for the general welfare exceeds the legitimate role of government.
Libertarianism in the United States has been described as conservative on economic issues and liberal on personal freedom (for common meanings of conservative and liberal in the United States) and it is also often associated with a foreign policy of non-interventionism.

Liberalism by country

liberal partyliberalliberal democratic
According to Louis Hartz, liberalism in the United States differs from liberalism elsewhere in the world because America never had a resident hereditary aristocracy, and as such, avoided much of the "class warfare" that swept Europe.
In the United States, the two major political forces, the Republican Party and the Democratic Party, are to some extent, liberal (see Liberalism in the United States and Modern liberalism in the United States).

American Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary WarRevolutionary
From the time of the American Revolution to the present day, America has extended liberty to ever broader classes of people.
The Patriot leadership professed the political philosophies of liberalism and republicanism to reject monarchy and aristocracy, and they proclaimed that all men are created equal.

The New Republic

New Republicthe ''New RepublicBruce Bliven
He effectively combined classical liberal theory with progressive philosophy and founded the periodical The New Republic to present his ideas.
The magazine's politics were liberal and progressive, and as such concerned with coping with the great changes brought about by middle-class reform efforts designed to remedy the weaknesses in America's changing economy and society.

Age of Enlightenment

Enlightenmentthe Enlightenment18th-century philosophy
The origins of American liberalism lie in the political ideals of the Enlightenment.
During the Enlightenment there was a great emphasis upon liberty, republicanism and religious tolerance.

Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic Party
The Democratic Party had two wings: on the one hand, Northern and Western liberals, on the other generally conservative Southern whites.
The economically activist philosophy of Franklin D. Roosevelt, which has strongly influenced American liberalism, shaped much of the party's economic agenda after 1932.

New Deal

the New DealFirst 100 Daysfirst hundred days
Since the 1930s, without a qualifier the term "liberalism" in the United States usually refers to "modern liberalism", a political philosophy exemplified by Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal and, later, Lyndon Johnson's Great Society.
Liberalism in the United States

Republican Party (United States)

RepublicanRepublican PartyR
Some historians have divided the Republican Party into liberal Wall Street and conservative Main Street factions; others have noted that the GOP's conservatives came from landlocked states (Robert Taft of Ohio and Barry Goldwater of Arizona) and the liberals tended to come from California (Earl Warren and Paul N. "Pete" McCloskey), New York (Nelson Rockefeller), and other coastal states.
In 2018, Gallup polling found that 69% of Republicans described themselves as 'conservative' while 25% opted for the term 'moderate' and another 5% self-identified as 'liberal' according to the survey results.

Supreme Court of the United States

Supreme CourtUnited States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme Court
An opposing view, offered by Cass R. Sunstein, in The Second Bill of Rights (Basic Books, 2004, ISBN: 0-465-08332-3) argues that Nixon, through his Supreme Court appointments, effectively ended a decades-long expansion under U.S. law of economic rights along the lines of those put forward in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted in 1948 by the United Nations General Assembly.
In modern discourse, the justices are often categorized as having conservative, moderate, or liberal philosophies of law and of judicial interpretation.

Four Freedoms

Four Freedoms Speech1941 State of the Union Addressfour essential freedoms
The essential tenets of Cold War liberalism can be found in Roosevelt's Four Freedoms (1941): of these, freedom of speech and of religion were classic liberal freedoms, as was "freedom from fear" (freedom from tyrannical government), but "freedom from want" was another matter.
Liberalism in the United States

Libertarianism in the United States

libertarianlibertariansLibertarianism
Libertarianism in the United States
Most of them would have described themselves as "liberals" before the New Deal, but by the mid-1930s that word had been widely used to mean social liberalism.

George McGovern

McGovernGeorge S. McGovernMcGovern, George
While the civil rights movement isolated liberals from the working class and southern Democrats, the Vietnam War threw another wedge into the liberal ranks, dividing pro-war "hawks" such as Senator Henry M. Jackson from "doves" such as Senator (and 1972 presidential candidate) George McGovern.
Nevertheless, he refused to believe that American liberalism was dead in the time of Reagan; remaining active in politics, in January 1981 he founded the political organization Americans for Common Sense.

Robert F. Kennedy

Robert KennedyRobertBobby Kennedy
After Johnson refused to run again, assassination removed Robert Kennedy from contention and noted liberal Vice President Hubert Humphrey emerged from the disastrous 1968 Democratic National Convention with the presidential nomination of a deeply divided party.
Kennedy's (and to a lesser extent his older brother's) ideas about using government authority to assist less fortunate peoples became central to American liberalism as a tenet of the "Kennedy legacy".

The New York Times

New York TimesNY TimesTimes
While it is difficult to gather demographic information on ideological groups, recent surveys by the New York Times and CBS News indicate that between 18% and 27% of American adults identify as liberal, versus moderate or conservative.
The New York Times editorial page is often regarded as liberal.

Conservatism in the United States

conservativeconservativesConservatism
Conservatism in the United States
Liberalism and progressivism in the United States

Natural and legal rights

natural rightsnatural rightlegal rights
Liberalism in the United States is a broad political philosophy centered on what many see as the unalienable rights of the individual.

Freedom of speech

free speechfreedom of expressionfree expression
The fundamental liberal ideals of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion for all belief systems, and the separation of church and state, right to due process, and equality under the law are widely accepted as a common foundation across the spectrum of liberal thought. The essential tenets of Cold War liberalism can be found in Roosevelt's Four Freedoms (1941): of these, freedom of speech and of religion were classic liberal freedoms, as was "freedom from fear" (freedom from tyrannical government), but "freedom from want" was another matter.

Freedom of the press

press freedompressfreedom of press
The fundamental liberal ideals of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion for all belief systems, and the separation of church and state, right to due process, and equality under the law are widely accepted as a common foundation across the spectrum of liberal thought.

Freedom of religion

religious freedomreligious libertyreligion
The fundamental liberal ideals of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion for all belief systems, and the separation of church and state, right to due process, and equality under the law are widely accepted as a common foundation across the spectrum of liberal thought. The essential tenets of Cold War liberalism can be found in Roosevelt's Four Freedoms (1941): of these, freedom of speech and of religion were classic liberal freedoms, as was "freedom from fear" (freedom from tyrannical government), but "freedom from want" was another matter.

Separation of church and state

disestablishmentchurch and stateseparation of religion and state
The fundamental liberal ideals of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion for all belief systems, and the separation of church and state, right to due process, and equality under the law are widely accepted as a common foundation across the spectrum of liberal thought.

Due process

due process of lawDue Process Clausejudicial procedure
The fundamental liberal ideals of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion for all belief systems, and the separation of church and state, right to due process, and equality under the law are widely accepted as a common foundation across the spectrum of liberal thought.

Equality before the law

equalityequal rightsequality under the law
The fundamental liberal ideals of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion for all belief systems, and the separation of church and state, right to due process, and equality under the law are widely accepted as a common foundation across the spectrum of liberal thought.

Modern liberalism in the United States

liberalliberalsLiberalism
Modern liberalism in the United States includes issues such as same-sex marriage, reproductive and other women's rights, voting rights for all adult citizens, civil rights, environmental justice, and government protection of freedom from want.