Liberty Bell

Liberty Bell CenterBellCentennial BellL. BellLibertyLiberty Bell Pavilionsame namethe bellThe Liberty Bellthe symbol of the American Revolution
The Liberty Bell is an iconic symbol of American independence, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.wikipedia
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Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
The Liberty Bell is an iconic symbol of American independence, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Several other key events occurred in Philadelphia during the Revolutionary War including the First Continental Congress, the preservation of the Liberty Bell, the Battle of Germantown, and the Siege of Fort Mifflin.

Independence National Historical Park

Independence MallIndependence Mall EastIndependence Hall area
Once placed in the steeple of the Pennsylvania State House (now renamed Independence Hall), the bell today is located in the Liberty Bell Center in Independence National Historical Park.
Across the street from Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell, an iconic symbol of American independence, is displayed in the Liberty Bell Center.

Whitechapel Bell Foundry

Mears and StainbankMears & StainbankWhitechapel
The bell was commissioned in 1752 by the Pennsylvania Provincial Assembly from the London firm of Lester and Pack (known subsequently as the Whitechapel Bell Foundry), and was cast with the lettering "Proclaim LIBERTY Throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants Thereof", a Biblical reference from the Book of Leviticus.
The foundry was notable for being the original manufacturer of the Liberty Bell, a famous symbol of American independence, and for re-casting Big Ben, which rings from the north clock tower (the Elizabeth Tower) at the Houses of Parliament in London.

Independence Hall

Pennsylvania State HouseState HouseIndependence Square
Once placed in the steeple of the Pennsylvania State House (now renamed Independence Hall), the bell today is located in the Liberty Bell Center in Independence National Historical Park.
The acquisition of the original clock and bell by the Pennsylvania Colonial Assembly is closely related to the acquisition of the Liberty Bell.

Independence Mall (Philadelphia)

Independence Mall5th Street (Philadelphia)
It was moved from its longtime home in Independence Hall to a nearby glass pavilion on Independence Mall in 1976, and then to the larger Liberty Bell Center adjacent to the pavilion in 2003.
Buildings and structures on the Mall include the National Constitution Center (3rd block); the Independence Visitor Center and the Free Quaker Meetinghouse (2nd Block); and the President's House Memorial and the Liberty Bell Center (1st Block).

Province of Pennsylvania

PennsylvaniaPennsylvania ColonyPennsylvania Provincial Assembly
The bell was commissioned in 1752 by the Pennsylvania Provincial Assembly from the London firm of Lester and Pack (known subsequently as the Whitechapel Bell Foundry), and was cast with the lettering "Proclaim LIBERTY Throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants Thereof", a Biblical reference from the Book of Leviticus.
Likewise in 1751, the Pennsylvania State House ordered a new bell which would become known as the Liberty Bell for the new bell tower being built in the Pennsylvania State House in Philadelphia.

Allentown, Pennsylvania

AllentownAllentown, PACity of Allentown
Local wagoneers transported the bell to the Zion German Reformed Church in Northampton Town, now Allentown, where it waited out the British occupation of Philadelphia under the church floor boards.
Allentown holds historical significance as the location where the Liberty Bell (then known as the Pennsylvania State House bell) was successfully hidden from the British during the American Revolutionary War.

St. Augustine Church (Philadelphia)

St. Augustine ChurchSt. Augustine's ChurchSt. Augustine
In 1828, the city sold the second Lester and Pack bell to St. Augustine's Roman Catholic Church that was burned down by an anti-Catholic mob in the Philadelphia Nativist Riots of 1844.
The first Order of Hermits of St. Augustine church founded in the United States, the original St Augustine housed the Liberty Bell's "Sister Bell".

Andrew McNair

If the bell was rung, it would have been most likely rung by Andrew McNair, who was the doorkeeper both of the Assembly and of the Congress, and was responsible for ringing the bell.
A member of the Masonic Order, he served as official ringer of the Liberty Bell from 1759 to 1776, and he likely rang it to announce independence, on July 8, 1776 (the announcement was delayed four days to allow the Declaration of Independence to be printed).

John Marshall

Chief Justice MarshallMarshallChief Justice John Marshall
The bell acquired its distinctive large crack some time in the early 19th century—a widespread story claims it cracked while ringing after the death of Chief Justice John Marshall in 1835.
The Liberty Bell was rung following his death—a widespread story claims that this was when the bell cracked, never to be rung again.

The Liberty Bell (march)

The Liberty BellLiberty Bell MarchLiberty Bell
On July 4, 1893, in Chicago, the bell was serenaded with the first performance of The Liberty Bell March, conducted by "America's Bandleader", John Philip Sousa.
Shortly afterwards, while attending the Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Sousa and his band manager George Hinton watched the spectacle "America", in which a backdrop depicting the Liberty Bell was lowered.

George Lippard

A great part of the modern image of the bell as a relic of the proclamation of American independence was forged by writer George Lippard.
After the document was signed, Lippard claimed, independence was announced to the people by the ringing of the Liberty Bell on the 4th of July, causing its fabled crack, though this event did not happen.

Panama–Pacific International Exposition

Panama-Pacific International ExpositionPanama-Pacific ExpositionPanama Pacific International Exposition
) When, in 1912, the organizers of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition requested the bell for the 1915 fair in San Francisco, the city was reluctant to let it travel again.
The Liberty Bell traveled by train on a nationwide tour from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to attend the exposition.

High German Evangelical Reformed Church

Old Zion Reformed ChurchZion German Reformed ChurchZion United Church of Christ
Local wagoneers transported the bell to the Zion German Reformed Church in Northampton Town, now Allentown, where it waited out the British occupation of Philadelphia under the church floor boards.
In 1777, while the British occupied Philadelphia, this church was used to hide the Liberty Bell as well as the chimes from Philadelphia's Christ Church.

Justice Bell (Valley Forge)

Justice BellJustice Bell ''(Women's Liberty Bell)Justice Bell" (aka "Women's Liberty Bell")
In addition to the replicas that are seen at Independence National Historical Park, early replicas of the Liberty Bell include the so-called Justice Bell or Women's Liberty Bell, commissioned in 1915 by suffragists to advocate for women's suffrage.
The Justice Bell (The Women's Liberty Bell) is a replica of the Liberty Bell made in 1915.

Liberty Bell Pavilion

Rizzo's view prevailed, and the bell was moved to a glass-and-steel Liberty Bell Pavilion, about 200 yd from its old home at Independence Hall, as the Bicentennial year began.
The Liberty Bell Pavilion (demolished) was a building within Independence National Historical Park (INHP) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, that housed the Liberty Bell from January 1, 1976 to October 9, 2003.

Bernard Cywinski

The Olin Partnership was hired to create a new master plan for Independence Mall; its team included architect Bernard Cywinski, who ultimately won a limited design competition to design what was called the Liberty Bell Center (LBC).
His works include the Liberty Bell Center at Independence National Historical Park and the G. Wayne Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Villanova University

VillanovaVillanova CollegeVillanova Wildcats
The remains of the bell were recast; the new bell is now located at Villanova University.
Villanova University was home to the Liberty Bell's "Sister Bell", the replacement bell ordered from the Whitechapel Bell Foundry after the original bell cracked in 1753.

1939 New York World's Fair

New York World's Fair1939 World's FairWorld's Fair
Chicago tried again, with a petition signed by 3.4 million schoolchildren, for the 1933 Century of Progress Exhibition and New York presented a petition to secure a visit from the bell for the 1939 New York World's Fair.
The interior had a "Diplomat room", which featured a reproduction of the Liberty Bell made out of Japanese pearls and diamonds, worth $1 million.

Franklin half dollar

FranklinFull Bell Linescoin
Its first use on a circulating coin was on the reverse side of the Franklin half dollar, struck between 1948 and 1963.
The fifty-cent piece pictures Founding Father Benjamin Franklin on the obverse and the Liberty Bell on the reverse.

Liberty Square (Magic Kingdom)

Liberty Square
Walt Disney World has a replica of the Liberty Bell that is located in Liberty Square in the Magic Kingdom.
Themed after colonial America, replicas of both the Liberty Bell and Liberty Tree can be seen here.

President's House (Philadelphia)

President's HousePresident's House in Philadelphiaexecutive mansion
Significantly larger than the existing pavilion, allowing for exhibit space and an interpretive center, the proposed LBC building also would cover about 15% of the footprint of the long-demolished President's House, the "White House" of George Washington and John Adams.
In late 2000, during excavation for the new Liberty Bell Center, foundations of the President's House were uncovered.

United States Bicentennial coinage

Bicentennialbicentennial quarter1976 Bicentennial
It also appeared on the Bicentennial design of the Eisenhower dollar, superimposed against the moon.
A nationwide competition resulted in designs of a Colonial drummer for the quarter, Independence Hall for the half dollar and the Liberty Bell superimposed against the Moon for the dollar.

Liberty Belle (comics)

Liberty BelleLibby LawrenceLibby Lawrence-Chambers
Her powers of enhanced speed, strength, and stamina were linked to the ringing of the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia.

Liberty Bell Ruby

It weighs four pounds, is eight and a half thousand carats, and is sculpted into a miniature form of the Liberty Bell.