Library Company of Philadelphia

Library CompanyLibrary Hallthe Library Company of PhiladelphialibraryRidgway Library
The Library Company of Philadelphia (LCP) is a non-profit organization based in Philadelphia.wikipedia
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Benjamin Franklin

FranklinBen FranklinFranklin, Benjamin
Founded in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin as a library, the Library Company of Philadelphia has accumulated one of the most significant collections of historically valuable manuscripts and printed material in the United States. The Library Company was an offshoot of the Junto, a discussion group in colonial Philadelphia, that gravitated around Benjamin Franklin.
He founded many civic organizations, including the Library Company, Philadelphia's first fire department and the University of Pennsylvania.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
The Library Company of Philadelphia (LCP) is a non-profit organization based in Philadelphia.
Philadelphia is the birthplace of the United States Marine Corps, and is also the home of many U.S. firsts, including the first library (1731), hospital (1751), medical school (1765), national capital (1774), stock exchange (1790), zoo (1874), and business school (1881).

Subscription library

subscription librariesproprietary librarysocial library
Therefore, "the Mother of all American subscription libraries" was established, and a list of desired books compiled in part by James Logan, "the best Judge of Books in these parts," was sent to London and by autumn the first books were on the shelves.
In the American colonies, the Library Company of Philadelphia was started in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin in Philadelphia, PA.

Library

librariesreading roomreference library
Founded in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin as a library, the Library Company of Philadelphia has accumulated one of the most significant collections of historically valuable manuscripts and printed material in the United States.
In the American colonies, the Library Company of Philadelphia was started in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin in Philadelphia.

Junto (club)

JuntoJunto Club
The Library Company was an offshoot of the Junto, a discussion group in colonial Philadelphia, that gravitated around Benjamin Franklin.
Jones was a Philadelphia Quaker, a neighbor of Franklin's, and later a founding member of the Library Company of Philadelphia.

The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

AutobiographyHis AutobiographyBenjamin Franklin - Autobiography
Members of the Library Company soon opened their own book presses to make donations: A Collection of Several Pieces, by John Locke; Logic: or, the Art of Thinking, by the Port Royalists Antoine Arnauld and Pierre Nicole, which Franklin in his autobiography said he had read at the age of 16; Plutarch's Moralia translated by Philemon Holland; Lewis Roberts' Merchants Mappe of Commerce, and others.
In 1730 he marries Deborah Read, and after this, with the help of the Junto, he draws up proposals for Library Company of Philadelphia.

Louis Timothee

Lewis Timothy
The first librarian they hired was Louis Timothee, America's first.
In 1732 also Franklin arranged for Timothy to serve as a part-time librarian for the Library Company of Philadelphia, one of Franklin's first philanthropic projects.

Peter Stretch

It was a disappointing turnout: all but John Sober and the hatter Joseph Stretch (son of Peter Stretch), who later became a Pennsylvania assemblyman, were officers.
Joseph Stretch was a founding member of the Library Company of Philadelphia, which was established through the influence of Benjamin Franklin in 1741.

James Logan (statesman)

James LoganLogan
Therefore, "the Mother of all American subscription libraries" was established, and a list of desired books compiled in part by James Logan, "the best Judge of Books in these parts," was sent to London and by autumn the first books were on the shelves.
Franklin and the other members of the Junto considered Logan the "best Judge of Books in these parts" and chose him to select the first 43 titles for the Library Company of Philadelphia.

Liberty Displaying the Arts and Sciences

For the new library Samuel Jennings, an expatriate Philadelphian living in London, painted a large picture, "Liberty Displaying the Arts and Sciences."
The Library Company of Philadelphia, a private lending library founded by Benjamin Franklin in the mid-18th century, commissioned Jennings (an ex-Philadelphian relocated to London) to create a work depicting "the figure of Liberty (with her cap and proper Insignia) displaying the arts" as a representation of slavery and a symbol of the abolitionist movement.

Carpenters' Hall

Carpenters' Company of PhiladelphiaCarpenters' Company hall
The Library absorbed smaller lending libraries and outgrew its rooms, renting larger space on the second floor of the new Carpenters' Company hall in 1773.
The meeting hall served as a hospital for both British and American troops in the Revolutionary War, and other institutions in Philadelphia have held meetings in Carpenters' Hall, including Franklin's Library Company of Philadelphia, the American Philosophical Society, and the First and Second Banks of the United States.

Peter Collinson (botanist)

Peter CollinsonCollinsonPeter Collinson, F.R.S.
The Company's agent in London was Peter Collinson, Fellow of the Royal Society, the Quaker mercer-naturalist of London, who corresponded with John Bartram.
He also served for many years as the purchasing agent for the Library Company of Philadelphia.

History of public library advocacy

History of Public Library Advocacy
In 1731, Benjamin Franklin and his fellow members of the Junto established the Library Company of Philadelphia.

William Thornton

Dr. William Thornton
A competition for the design of a building was won by an amateur of architecture, Dr. William Thornton, with a plan for a Palladian red-brick structure with white pilasters and a pediment interrupting a balustraded roof.
In 1789, after briefly practicing medicine and pursuing an interest in steamboats, Thornton submitted a design to the architectural competition for the Library Company of Philadelphia's new hall.

Frank Furness

Furness & HewittFurnessFurness & Evans
A new, more centrally located, library designed by Frank Furness opened its doors in 1880 at Juniper and Locust Street.
The 2012 centenary of Furness's death was observed with exhibitions at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University, the Library Company of Philadelphia, the Athenaeum of Philadelphia, the Delaware Historical Society, the First Unitarian Church of Philadelphia, and elsewhere.

Life in Philadelphia

Life in Philadelphia
Life in Philadelphia is held in the collection of The Library Company of Philadelphia.

Public library advocacy

advocacyadvocatesLibrary Book Cart Drill Team Championship
Public Library Advocacy
Library Company of Philadelphia

Nonprofit organization

non-profitnon-profit organizationnonprofit
The Library Company of Philadelphia (LCP) is a non-profit organization based in Philadelphia.

Manuscript

manuscriptsMSscript
Founded in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin as a library, the Library Company of Philadelphia has accumulated one of the most significant collections of historically valuable manuscripts and printed material in the United States.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
Founded in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin as a library, the Library Company of Philadelphia has accumulated one of the most significant collections of historically valuable manuscripts and printed material in the United States.

Mayflower Compact

CompactMayflower'' CompactPilgrim Compact
The current collection size is about 500,000 books and 70,000 other items, including 2,150 items that once belonged to Franklin, the Mayflower Compact, major collections of 17th-century and Revolution-era pamphlets and ephemera, maps, and whole libraries assembled in the 18th and 19th centuries.

American Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary WarRevolutionary
The current collection size is about 500,000 books and 70,000 other items, including 2,150 items that once belonged to Franklin, the Mayflower Compact, major collections of 17th-century and Revolution-era pamphlets and ephemera, maps, and whole libraries assembled in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Pamphlet

pamphletsleafletleaflets
The current collection size is about 500,000 books and 70,000 other items, including 2,150 items that once belonged to Franklin, the Mayflower Compact, major collections of 17th-century and Revolution-era pamphlets and ephemera, maps, and whole libraries assembled in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Ephemera

ephemeral itemspaper ephemera
The current collection size is about 500,000 books and 70,000 other items, including 2,150 items that once belonged to Franklin, the Mayflower Compact, major collections of 17th-century and Revolution-era pamphlets and ephemera, maps, and whole libraries assembled in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Map

mapspolitical mapmap reading
The current collection size is about 500,000 books and 70,000 other items, including 2,150 items that once belonged to Franklin, the Mayflower Compact, major collections of 17th-century and Revolution-era pamphlets and ephemera, maps, and whole libraries assembled in the 18th and 19th centuries.