Library of America

Nonprofit publisher of classic American literature.

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Phillip Lopate

American film critic, essayist, fiction writer, poet, and teacher.

American film critic, essayist, fiction writer, poet, and teacher.

He edited a massive anthology of American film criticism from the silent era to present day, entitled American Movie Critics: From Silents Until Now, was published in March 2006 for Library of America.

Cover of a 1921 libretto for Giordano's Andrea Chénier

J. D. McClatchy

American poet, opera librettist and literary critic.

American poet, opera librettist and literary critic.

Cover of a 1921 libretto for Giordano's Andrea Chénier

American Writers at Home, photographs by Erica Lennard (Library of America, 240 pages, October 2004)

John W. Sterling, namesake of the title

David Bromwich

Sterling Professor of English at Yale University.

Sterling Professor of English at Yale University.

John W. Sterling, namesake of the title

American Sonnets: An Anthology (New York, NY: Library of America, 2007). Editor.

Wright in a 1939 photograph by Carl Van Vechten

Richard Wright (author)

American author of novels, short stories, poems, and non-fiction.

American author of novels, short stories, poems, and non-fiction.

Wright in a 1939 photograph by Carl Van Vechten
A historic marker in Natchez, Mississippi, commemorating Richard Wright, who was born near the city
Canada Lee as Bigger Thomas in the Orson Welles production of Native Son (1941)
Plaque commemorating Wright's residence in Paris, at 14, rue Monsieur le Prince.
Banned Books Week reading of Black Boy at Shimer College in 2013

American Hunger, which was published posthumously in 1977, was originally intended by Wright as the second volume of Black Boy. The Library of America edition of 1991 finally restored the book to its original two-volume form.

Samuel Menashe

American poet.

American poet.

The award was also to include a book to be published by the Library of America, which turned out to be a "Selected Poems" edited by Ricks.

A page of a birth register for Jews from 1859

Brenda Wineapple

American nonfiction writer, literary critic, and essayist who has written several books on nineteenth-century American writers.

American nonfiction writer, literary critic, and essayist who has written several books on nineteenth-century American writers.

A page of a birth register for Jews from 1859

She serves as literary advisor for the Guggenheim Foundation and the Library of America, and she is on the advisor board of Lapham's Quarterly and The American Scholar.

Dust-jacket illustration of Tarzan of the Apes.

Tarzan of the Apes

1912 story by American writer Edgar Rice Burroughs.

1912 story by American writer Edgar Rice Burroughs.

Dust-jacket illustration of Tarzan of the Apes.

In April 2012, in advance of the novel's centennial anniversary, the Library of America published a hardcover edition based on Burroughs' original novel, with an introduction by Thomas Mallon.(ISBN: 978-1-59853-164-0).

Bill Littlefield

The host of National Public Radio and WBUR's Only A Game program from its beginning in 1993 to July 2018, covering mainstream and offbeat United States and international sports.

The host of National Public Radio and WBUR's Only A Game program from its beginning in 1993 to July 2018, covering mainstream and offbeat United States and international sports.

“Take Me Out”, Bill’s collection of sport-and-games-related doggerel, was published in 2014, and in January 2015, Library of America published The Best of W.C. Heinz, which Bill edited, and for which he wrote the introduction.

Hawthorne in the 1860s

Nathaniel Hawthorne

American novelist, dark romantic, and short story writer.

American novelist, dark romantic, and short story writer.

Hawthorne in the 1860s
Portrait of Nathaniel Hawthorne by Charles Osgood, 1841 (Peabody Essex Museum)
Nathaniel Hawthorne's childhood home in Raymond, ME
Boston Custom House, Custom House Street, where Hawthorne worked ca.1839–40
Sophia Peabody Hawthorne (1809–1871)
Una, Julian, and Rose ca. 1862
Daguerrotype of Hawthorne, Whipple & Black, 1848
Grave of Nathaniel Hawthorne
Statue of Hawthorne in Salem, Massachusetts, by Bela Lyon Pratt and dedicated in 1925
William H. Getchell's 1861 photograph of Hawthorne which inspired the sculpture
The Midas myth, from A Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys. Illustration by Walter Crane for the 1893 edition.

In 2008, the Library of America selected Hawthorne's "A show of wax-figures" for inclusion in its two-century retrospective of American True Crime.

Fearing c. 1940

Kenneth Fearing

American poet and novelist.

American poet and novelist.

Fearing c. 1940
The Big Clock first appeared in an abridged form in The American Magazine as "The Judas Picture" (October 1946)

A selection of Fearing's poems has been published as part of the Library of America's American Poets Project.