A report on WorldWideWeb and Libwww

WorldWideWeb, c. undefined 1994
WorldWideWeb, c. undefined 1994

In 1991 and 1992, Tim Berners-Lee and a student at CERN named Jean-François Groff rewrote various components of the original WorldWideWeb browser for the NeXTstep operating system in portable C code, in order to demonstrate the potential of the World Wide Web.

- Libwww

Berners-Lee and Groff later adapted many of WorldWideWeb's components into a C programming language version, creating the libwww API.

- WorldWideWeb
WorldWideWeb, c. undefined 1994

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Line Mode Browser displaying the German Wikipedia

Line Mode Browser

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Second web browser ever created.

Second web browser ever created.

Line Mode Browser displaying the German Wikipedia
Line Mode Browser displaying the German Wikipedia

The browser was developed starting in 1990, and then supported by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) as an example and test application for the libwww library.

In 1990, Tim Berners-Lee had already written the first browser, WorldWideWeb (later renamed to Nexus), but that program only worked on the proprietary software of NeXT computers, which were in limited use.

NCSA Mosaic 2.7 for Unix

Mosaic (web browser)

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Discontinued web browser, one of the first to be widely available.

Discontinued web browser, one of the first to be widely available.

NCSA Mosaic 2.7 for Unix
Mosaic 1.0 running under System 7.1, displaying the Mosaic Communications Corporation (later Netscape) website.

It is often described as the first graphical web browser, though it was preceded by WorldWideWeb, the lesser-known Erwise, and ViolaWWW.

Mosaic is based on the libwww library and thus supported a wide variety of Internet protocols included in the library: Archie, FTP, gopher, HTTP, NNTP, telnet, WAIS.