Licensure

licensedprofessional licensinglicensingregistrationprofessional licensebusiness and professional licenseslicensesengineer's licenseLicencelicensed professional
Licensure means a restricted practice or a restriction on the use of an occupational title, requiring a license.wikipedia
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Practicing without a license

practicing medicine without a licenseunlicensedpracticing dentistry without a license
practicing without a license may carry civil or criminal penalties or may be perfectly legal.
Practicing without a license is the act of working without the licensure offered for that occupation, in a particular jurisdiction.

Licensed professional counselor

counselorcounsellorcounselors
Examples of professions that require licensure in some jurisdictions include: actuary, architect, certified public accountant, electrician, engineering, general contractors, financial analyst, geologists, hedge fund manager, insurance agent, interior design, investment banker, licensed professional counselor, nurse, physical therapist, plumber, private investigator, psychologist, landscape architect, lawyer, nutritionist, physician, real estate broker, speech-language pathologist, school counselor, social worker, stockbroker, surveyor, and teacher.
Licensed professional counselor (LPC) is a licensure for mental health professionals in some countries.

Profession

professionsoccupationprofessed
In the United States and Canada, licensing (the term registration is sometimes used) is usually required by law to work in a particular profession or to obtain a privilege such as to drive a car or truck.
All professions involve technical, specialized and highly skilled work often referred to as "professional expertise." Training for this work involves obtaining degrees and professional qualifications (see Licensure) without which entry to the profession is barred (occupational closure).

Professional association

professional organizationprofessional bodyprofessional society
For some occupations and professions, licensing is often granted through a professional body or a licensing board composed of practitioners who oversee the applications for licenses.
Membership of a professional body, as a legal requirement, can in some professions form the primary formal basis for gaining entry to and setting up practice within the profession; see licensure.

Regulation and licensure in engineering

Professional EngineerChartered EngineerCEng
Upon the successful attainment of a license, individuals append an acronym to their name, such as CPA (Certified Public Accountant) or LPD and PI (Private Detective and Investigator) PE (Professional Engineer).
Regulation and licensure in engineering is established by various jurisdictions of the world to encourage public welfare, safety, well-being and other interests of the general public and to define the licensure process through which an engineer becomes authorized to practice engineering and/or provide engineering professional services to the public.

Nutritionist

sports nutritionistnutritionnutritionists
Examples of professions that require licensure in some jurisdictions include: actuary, architect, certified public accountant, electrician, engineering, general contractors, financial analyst, geologists, hedge fund manager, insurance agent, interior design, investment banker, licensed professional counselor, nurse, physical therapist, plumber, private investigator, psychologist, landscape architect, lawyer, nutritionist, physician, real estate broker, speech-language pathologist, school counselor, social worker, stockbroker, surveyor, and teacher.
In many countries, a person can claim to be a nutritionist even without any training, education, or professional license, in contrast to a dietitian, who has a university degree, professional license, and certification for professional practice.

Occupational closure

into true professions, licensing fast became the method of choice in obtaining the occupational closure required by barring competition from entry to the rites and privileges of a professional group.
This can be achieved by licensure, through barring entry to all except those who have passed certain entrance examinations and grades of training, or by allowing entry only to those who have gained membership of a specific professional body.

License

licensinglicencelicensed
Licensure means a restricted practice or a restriction on the use of an occupational title, requiring a license.

Academic degree

degreedegreesuniversity degree
In many cases, an individual must complete certain steps, such as training, acquiring an academic degree in a particular area of study, and/or passing an exam, before becoming eligible to receive their license.
It is not an academic degree but a government licensing examination that future doctors, dentists, teachers, lawyers (solicitors), judges, public prosecutors, patent attorneys and pharmacists have to pass in order to be eligible to work in their profession.

Social work

social workersocial servicessocial service
Examples of professions that require licensure in some jurisdictions include: actuary, architect, certified public accountant, electrician, engineering, general contractors, financial analyst, geologists, hedge fund manager, insurance agent, interior design, investment banker, licensed professional counselor, nurse, physical therapist, plumber, private investigator, psychologist, landscape architect, lawyer, nutritionist, physician, real estate broker, speech-language pathologist, school counselor, social worker, stockbroker, surveyor, and teacher.
A number of countries and jurisdictions require registration or licensure of people working as social workers, and there are mandated qualifications.

Test (assessment)

examinationexamtest
In many cases, an individual must complete certain steps, such as training, acquiring an academic degree in a particular area of study, and/or passing an exam, before becoming eligible to receive their license.
Performance tests are commonly used in workplace and professional applications, such as professional certification and licensure.

Professional degree

first professional degreeprofessionaldegree
A professional degree, formerly known in the US as a first professional degree, is a degree that prepares someone to work in a particular profession, often, but not always, meeting the academic requirements for licensure or accreditation.

North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners v. FTC

North Carolina Board of Dental Examiners v. Federal Trade Commission
However, the 2015 decision in North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners v. FTC held that a state occupational licensing board that was primarily composed of persons active in the market it regulates has immunity from antitrust law only when it is actively supervised by the state.
North Carolina legislation had designated the North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners (NCBDE) to be "the agency of the State for the regulation of the practice of dentistry" and required that six of the eight members of the Board must be licensed, practicing dentists.

Racing secretary

Occupations of or affected by the gambling industry, may be restricted by licensure, such as a racing secretary in horseracing, or people in the boxing, mixed martial arts, and professional wrestling industry.
The secretary is typically licensed by the government and is responsible for the custody and safekeeping of horse papers and ownership documents, forming races, compiling a list of entries, keeping a complete record of all races, publishing and printing an accurate race program, writing the condition book, providing records for the media, and communicating with the racing commission and/or other government oversight agencies.

Nevada Athletic Commission

Nevada State Athletic CommissionNSACKeith Kizer
The Nevada Athletic Commission (popularly known as the Nevada State Athletic Commission or NSAC) regulates all contests and exhibitions of unarmed combat within the state of Nevada, including licensure and supervision of promoters, boxers, kickboxers, mixed martial arts fighters, seconds, ring officials, managers, and matchmakers.

Professional development

continuing professional developmentprofessional trainingcontinuing professional education
In the United Kingdom such regular upgrading of skills is often termed continuous professional development, or CPD.

Physician

doctormedical doctorphysicians
Examples of professions that require licensure in some jurisdictions include: actuary, architect, certified public accountant, electrician, engineering, general contractors, financial analyst, geologists, hedge fund manager, insurance agent, interior design, investment banker, licensed professional counselor, nurse, physical therapist, plumber, private investigator, psychologist, landscape architect, lawyer, nutritionist, physician, real estate broker, speech-language pathologist, school counselor, social worker, stockbroker, surveyor, and teacher.
Among the English-speaking countries, this process is known either as licensure as in the United States, or as registration in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and Ireland.

Doctorate

doctoraldoctoral degreedoctorate degree
In the US, professional doctorates (formally "doctor's degree – professional practice" in government classifications) are defined by the US Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics as degrees that require a minimum of six years of university-level study (including any pre-professional bachelor's or associate degree) and meet the academic requirements for professional licensure in the discipline.

Massage

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People whose occupations put them in physical contact with the public might also be restricted by licensure, including a barber, cosmetologist, or massage therapist.
In the US, licensure is the highest level of regulation and this restricts anyone without a license from practicing massage therapy or by calling themselves that protected title.

Occupational licensing

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Occupational licensing has the strongest public support for activities whose incompetent execution would be a health or safety threat to the public, such as practicing medicine.

Floristry

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Licensing of low-risk businesses like florists and hair braiding salons is more controversial because licensing is inherently a form of restraint of trade.

Braid

braidsbraidingplaited
Licensing of low-risk businesses like florists and hair braiding salons is more controversial because licensing is inherently a form of restraint of trade.