Liechtenstein

Principality of LiechtensteinLIEFürstentum LiechtensteinLICulture of LiechtensteinsovereignTransport in Liechtensteincountry of the same namedetailsits army
Liechtenstein, officially the Principality of Liechtenstein (Fürstentum Liechtenstein), is a German-speaking microstate in Alpine Central Europe.wikipedia
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German language

GermanGerman-languageGerman-speaking
Liechtenstein, officially the Principality of Liechtenstein (Fürstentum Liechtenstein), is a German-speaking microstate in Alpine Central Europe.
It is the most widely spoken and official or co-official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, South Tyrol in Italy, the German-speaking Community of Belgium and Liechtenstein.

Microstate

microstatesstateletmicro-state
Liechtenstein, officially the Principality of Liechtenstein (Fürstentum Liechtenstein), is a German-speaking microstate in Alpine Central Europe.
In line with this and most other definitions, examples of microstates include Liechtenstein, Monaco, San Marino, Andorra, the Cook Islands, Niue, and the Federated States of Micronesia.

Alps

AlpineItalian Alpsthe Alps
Liechtenstein, officially the Principality of Liechtenstein (Fürstentum Liechtenstein), is a German-speaking microstate in Alpine Central Europe.
The Alps (Alpes ; Alpen ; Alpi ; Alps; Alpe ) are the highest and most extensive mountain range system that lies entirely in Europe, and stretching approximately 1200 km across eight Alpine countries (from west to east): France, Switzerland, Monaco, Italy, Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany, and Slovenia.

Switzerland

SwissSwiss ConfederationSWI
Liechtenstein is bordered by Switzerland to the west and south and Austria to the east and north.
Switzerland is a landlocked country bordered by Italy to the south, France to the west, Germany to the north, and Austria and Liechtenstein to the east.

Austria

AUTAustrianRepublic of Austria
Liechtenstein is bordered by Switzerland to the west and south and Austria to the east and north.
It is bordered by Germany and the Czech Republic to the north, Slovakia and Hungary to the east, Slovenia and Italy to the south, and Switzerland and Liechtenstein to the west.

Municipalities of Liechtenstein

municipalitymunicipalities11 communes
Divided into 11 municipalities, its capital is Vaduz, and its largest municipality is Schaan.
The principality of Liechtenstein is divided into eleven municipalities (Gemeinden, singular Gemeinde), most consisting of only a single town.

Vaduz

Vaduz, Liechtensteincountship of VaduzCounty of Vaduz
Divided into 11 municipalities, its capital is Vaduz, and its largest municipality is Schaan. Hans-Adam I was allowed to purchase the minuscule Herrschaft ("Lordship") of Schellenberg and county of Vaduz (in 1699 and 1712 respectively) from the Hohenems.
Vaduz ( or ) is the capital of Liechtenstein and also the seat of the national parliament.

Uzbekistan

UzbekUZBRepublic of Uzbekistan
Liechtenstein and Uzbekistan are the only two doubly landlocked countries in the world.
Along with Liechtenstein, it is one of the world's only two doubly landlocked countries.

Landlocked country

landlockedland-lockeddoubly landlocked
Liechtenstein and Uzbekistan are the only two doubly landlocked countries in the world.
Some landlocked countries are quite affluent, such as Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, and Austria, all of which, excluding Luxembourg, which is a founding member of NATO, frequently employ neutrality to their political advantage.

Schaan

Schaan, LiechtensteinSchaan Commune, LiechtensteinSchaan FL
Divided into 11 municipalities, its capital is Vaduz, and its largest municipality is Schaan.
Schaan is the largest municipality of Liechtenstein by population.

Principality

principalitiesprincedomecclesiastical principality
The principality is a semi-constitutional monarchy headed by the Prince of Liechtenstein.
Generally recognised surviving sovereign principalities are Liechtenstein, Monaco, and the co-principality of Andorra.

European Free Trade Association

EFTAEuropean Free Trade Association (EFTA)Member states of the European Free Trade Association
Liechtenstein is a member of the United Nations, the European Free Trade Association, and the Council of Europe, and although not a member of the European Union, it participates in both the Schengen Area and the European Economic Area.
The European Free Trade Association (EFTA) is a regional trade organization and free trade area consisting of four European states: Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, and Switzerland.

European Economic Area

EEAEuropean marketEuropean Economic Area (EEA)
Liechtenstein is a member of the United Nations, the European Free Trade Association, and the Council of Europe, and although not a member of the European Union, it participates in both the Schengen Area and the European Economic Area.
Membership has grown to 31 states as of 2016: 28 EU member states, as well as three of the four member states of the EFTA (Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway).

Schengen Area

SchengenSchengen zoneSchengen countries
Liechtenstein is a member of the United Nations, the European Free Trade Association, and the Council of Europe, and although not a member of the European Union, it participates in both the Schengen Area and the European Economic Area.

Walser

Walser migrations12th centuryBanat French
In 1300, an Alemannic population—the Walsers, who originated in Valais—entered the region and settled.
They inhabit the Alps of Switzerland and Liechtenstein, as well as the fringes of Italy and Austria.

Triesenberg

Triesenberg Commune, Liechtenstein
The mountain village of Triesenberg still preserves features of Walser dialect into the present century.
Triesenberg is a municipality in Liechtenstein with a population of 2,618.

Alemanni

AlamanniAlemannicAlamannic
In 259/60 Brigantium was destroyed by the Alemanni, a Germanic people who settled in the area in around 450 CE.
The area settled by the Alemanni corresponds roughly to the area where Alemannic German dialects remain spoken, including German Swabia and Baden, French Alsace, German-speaking Switzerland, Liechtenstein and Austrian Vorarlberg.

House of Liechtenstein

LiechtensteinPrincely Family of LiechtensteinPrincely House of Liechtenstein
This region was enfeoffed to the Counts of Hohenems until the sale to the Liechtenstein dynasty in 1699.
The House of Liechtenstein, from which the principality takes its name, is the family which reigns by constitutional, hereditary right over the nation of Liechtenstein.

Walser German

Walliser GermanWalserTöitschu
The mountain village of Triesenberg still preserves features of Walser dialect into the present century.
Walser German (Walserdeutsch) and Walliser German (Walliserdeutsch, locally Wallisertiitsch) are a group of Highest Alemannic dialects spoken in parts of Switzerland (Valais, Ticino, Grisons), Italy (Piedmont, Aosta Valley), Liechtenstein (Triesenberg, Planken), and Austria (Vorarlberg).

Schellenberg

lordship of Schellenbergmodern locationSchelleberg
Hans-Adam I was allowed to purchase the minuscule Herrschaft ("Lordship") of Schellenberg and county of Vaduz (in 1699 and 1712 respectively) from the Hohenems.
Schellenberg is a municipality in the lowland area of Liechtenstein, on the banks of the Rhine.

Central Europe

CentralMiddle EuropeCentral European
Liechtenstein, officially the Principality of Liechtenstein (Fürstentum Liechtenstein), is a German-speaking microstate in Alpine Central Europe.
Other populations include: Poland with around 38.5 million residents, Czech Republic at 10.5 million, Hungary at 10 million, Austria with 8.8 million, Switzerland with 8.5 million, Slovakia at 5.4 million, and Liechtenstein at a bit less than 40,000.

Alpine states

Alpine countriesAlpinealpine country
An Alpine country, Liechtenstein is mountainous, making it a winter sport destination.
The term Alpine states or Alpine countries refers to the territory of eight countries associated with the Alpine region, as defined by the Alpine Convention of 1991: Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Slovenia, and Switzerland.

Johann I Joseph, Prince of Liechtenstein

Johann Josef IJohann I Josef, Prince of LiechtensteinPrince Johann of Liechtenstein
In 1818, Prince Johann I granted the territory a limited constitution.
Johann I Joseph (Johann Baptist Josef Adam Johann Nepomuk Aloys Franz de Paula; 26 June 1760 – 20 April 1836) was Prince of Liechtenstein between 1805 and 1806 and again from 1814 until 1836.

European Union

EUEuropeanEurope
Liechtenstein is a member of the United Nations, the European Free Trade Association, and the Council of Europe, and although not a member of the European Union, it participates in both the Schengen Area and the European Economic Area.
The four countries forming the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) are not EU members, but have partly committed to the EU's economy and regulations: Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway, which are a part of the single market through the European Economic Area, and Switzerland, which has similar ties through bilateral treaties.

Franz Joseph II, Prince of Liechtenstein

Franz Joseph IIFranz Josef IIPrince Franz Joseph II
In March 1938, just after the annexation of Austria by Nazi Germany, Franz named as regent his 31-year-old grandnephew and heir-presumptive, Prince Franz Joseph.
Franz Joseph II (Franz Josef Maria Aloys Alfred Karl Johannes Heinrich Michael Georg Ignaz Benediktus Gerhardus Majella; 16 August 1906 – 13 November 1989) was the reigning Prince of Liechtenstein from 1938 until his death.