Life unworthy of life

unworthy of lifeLebensunwertes LebenLife Unworthy of Livingincapable of workinglives unworthy of lifeLives unworthy of life.unworthy lives
The phrase "life unworthy of life" (in "Lebensunwertes Leben") was a Nazi designation for the segments of the populace which, according to the Nazi regime of the time, had no right to live.wikipedia
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The Holocaust

HolocaustShoahNazi Holocaust
This concept formed an important component of the ideology of Nazism and eventually helped lead to the Holocaust.
The Nazis used the phrase Lebensunwertes Leben (life unworthy of life) in reference to the disabled and mentally ill. On 14 July 1933, the Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Diseased Offspring (Gesetz zur Verhütung erbkranken Nachwuchses), the Sterilization Law, was passed, allowing for compulsory sterilization.

Aktion T4

Action T4T-4 Euthanasia Programeuthanasia
It grew in extent and scope from Aktion T4 ending officially in 1941 when public protests stopped the program, through the Action 14f13 against concentration camp inmates.
Hitler was in favour of killing those whom he judged to be lebensunwertes Leben (Life unworthy of life).

Karl Binding

The expression first appeared in print via the title of a 1920 book, Die Freigabe der Vernichtung Lebensunwerten Lebens (Allowing the Destruction of Life Unworthy of Life) by two professors, the jurist Karl Binding (retired from the University of Leipzig) and psychiatrist Alfred Hoche from the University of Freiburg.
His influential book, Die Freigabe der Vernichtung lebensunwerten Lebens ("Allowing the Destruction of Life Unworthy of Living"), written together with the psychiatrist Alfred Hoche, was used by the Nazis to justify their T-4 Euthanasia Program.

Untermensch

Untermenschensubhumansubhumans
It is similar to but more restrictive than the concept of "Untermensch", subhumans, as not all "subhumans" were considered unworthy of life (Slavs, for instance, were deemed useful for slave labor).
It is related to the concept of "life unworthy of life", a more specific term which originally referred to the severely disabled who were involuntarily euthanised in Action T4, and was eventually applied to the extermination of the Jews.

Extermination camp

death campsdeath campextermination camps
The methods used initially at German hospitals such as lethal injections and bottled gas poisoning were expanded to form the basis for the creation of extermination camps where the gas chambers were built from scratch to conduct the extermination of the Jews, Romani, communists, anarchists, and political dissidents.
After the invasion of Poland in September 1939, the secret Aktion T4 euthanasia programme – the systematic murder of German, Austrian and Polish hospital patients with mental or physical disabilities – was initiated by the SS in order to eliminate "life unworthy of life" (Lebensunwertes Leben), a Nazi designation for people who had no right to life.

Nazi eugenics

eugenicseugeniceugenics programme
It also justified various human experimentation and eugenics programs, as well as Nazi racial policies.
Those humans targeted for destruction under Nazi eugenics policies were largely living in private and state-operated institutions, identified as "life unworthy of life" (Lebensunwertes Leben), including prisoners, "degenerates", dissidents, people with congenital cognitive and physical disabilities (including people who were "feeble-minded", epileptic, schizophrenic, manic-depressive, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, deaf, blind) (erbkranken), homosexual, idle, insane, and the weak, for elimination from the chain of heredity.

Alfred Hoche

Alfred Erich Hoche
The expression first appeared in print via the title of a 1920 book, Die Freigabe der Vernichtung Lebensunwerten Lebens (Allowing the Destruction of Life Unworthy of Life) by two professors, the jurist Karl Binding (retired from the University of Leipzig) and psychiatrist Alfred Hoche from the University of Freiburg.
Allowing the destruction of life unworthy of living (life unworthy of life).

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
The euthanasia of people with disabilities continued more discreetly until the end of World War II.
Nazi Germany was responsible for the Holocaust (killing approximately 6million Jews), as well as for killing 2.7 million ethnic Poles and 4million others who were deemed "unworthy of life" (including the disabled and mentally ill, Soviet prisoners of war, Romani, homosexuals, Freemasons, and Jehovah's Witnesses) as part of a programme of deliberate extermination, in effect becoming a "genocidal state".

Nazism and race

Nazi racial ideologyAryanNazi racial theories
An Untermensch would be stripped of all his/her rights, treated as an animal, deemed to have a Lebensunwertes Leben (life unworthy of living) and fit only for enslavement and extermination.

Glossary of Nazi Germany

SelektionKommandanturAltreich
The phrase "life unworthy of life" (in "Lebensunwertes Leben") was a Nazi designation for the segments of the populace which, according to the Nazi regime of the time, had no right to live.

Right to life

right-to-lifeliferight to live
The phrase "life unworthy of life" (in "Lebensunwertes Leben") was a Nazi designation for the segments of the populace which, according to the Nazi regime of the time, had no right to live.

Involuntary euthanasia

forced euthanasiaeuthanasiainvoluntarily euthanised
Those individuals were targeted to be euthanized by the state, usually through the compulsion or deception of their caretakers.

Informed consent

consentPrior Informed Consentconsensual
Those individuals were targeted to be euthanized by the state, usually through the compulsion or deception of their caretakers.

Ideology

ideologicalideologiespolitical ideology
This concept formed an important component of the ideology of Nazism and eventually helped lead to the Holocaust.

Nazism

NaziNazisNational Socialism
This concept formed an important component of the ideology of Nazism and eventually helped lead to the Holocaust.

Adolf Hitler

HitlerFührerthe leader
The euthanasia program was officially adopted in 1939 and came through the personal decision of Adolf Hitler.

Action 14f13

14f13Aktion 14f1314f13” murder campaign
It grew in extent and scope from Aktion T4 ending officially in 1941 when public protests stopped the program, through the Action 14f13 against concentration camp inmates.

Nazi concentration camps

Nazi concentration campconcentration campconcentration camps
It grew in extent and scope from Aktion T4 ending officially in 1941 when public protests stopped the program, through the Action 14f13 against concentration camp inmates.

Carbon monoxide

COcarbon monoxide (CO)carbon monoxide poisoning
The methods used initially at German hospitals such as lethal injections and bottled gas poisoning were expanded to form the basis for the creation of extermination camps where the gas chambers were built from scratch to conduct the extermination of the Jews, Romani, communists, anarchists, and political dissidents.

Gas chamber

gas chambersgassedlethal gas
The methods used initially at German hospitals such as lethal injections and bottled gas poisoning were expanded to form the basis for the creation of extermination camps where the gas chambers were built from scratch to conduct the extermination of the Jews, Romani, communists, anarchists, and political dissidents.

Leipzig University

University of LeipzigLeipzigKarl Marx University
The expression first appeared in print via the title of a 1920 book, Die Freigabe der Vernichtung Lebensunwerten Lebens (Allowing the Destruction of Life Unworthy of Life) by two professors, the jurist Karl Binding (retired from the University of Leipzig) and psychiatrist Alfred Hoche from the University of Freiburg.

University of Freiburg

FreiburgFreiburg UniversityAlbert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
The expression first appeared in print via the title of a 1920 book, Die Freigabe der Vernichtung Lebensunwerten Lebens (Allowing the Destruction of Life Unworthy of Life) by two professors, the jurist Karl Binding (retired from the University of Leipzig) and psychiatrist Alfred Hoche from the University of Freiburg.

Nazi human experimentation

human experimentationmedical experimentshuman experiments
It also justified various human experimentation and eugenics programs, as well as Nazi racial policies.

Racial policy of Nazi Germany

Nazi racial policiesNazi racial policyracial policies
It also justified various human experimentation and eugenics programs, as well as Nazi racial policies. The term included people with serious medical problems and those considered grossly inferior according to the racial policy of Nazi Germany.

Psychiatrist

psychiatristsclinical psychiatristconsultant psychiatrist
According to the author of Medical Killing and the Psychology of Genocide psychiatrist Robert Jay Lifton, the policy went through a number of iterations and modifications: