Lime (material)

limeLime (mineral)calcareousliminglimycallime pitlime-richlimestonebog lime
Lime is a calcium-containing inorganic mineral composed primarily of oxides, and hydroxide, usually calcium oxide and/ or calcium hydroxide.wikipedia
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Calcium

CaCa 2+ calcium ions
Lime is a calcium-containing inorganic mineral composed primarily of oxides, and hydroxide, usually calcium oxide and/ or calcium hydroxide.
The name derives from Latin calx "lime", which was obtained from heating limestone.

Concrete

admixturesworkabilitypoured concrete
These materials are still used in large quantities as building and engineering materials (including limestone products, cement, concrete, and mortar), as chemical feedstocks, and for sugar refining, among other uses.
Concrete is a composite material composed of fine and coarse aggregate bonded together with a fluid cement (cement paste) that hardens over time—most frequently in the past a lime-based cement binder, such as lime putty, but sometimes with other hydraulic cements, such as a calcium aluminate cement or with Portland cement to form Portland cement concrete (for its visual resemblance to Portland stone).

Cement

hydraulic cementcement plantcement factory
These materials are still used in large quantities as building and engineering materials (including limestone products, cement, concrete, and mortar), as chemical feedstocks, and for sugar refining, among other uses.
Cements used in construction are usually inorganic, often lime or calcium silicate based, and can be characterized as either hydraulic or non-hydraulic, depending on the ability of the cement to set in the presence of water (see hydraulic and non-hydraulic lime plaster).

Limestone

limestonescalcareouslime
It is also the name for calcium oxide which occurs as a product of coal-seam fires and in altered limestone xenoliths in volcanic ejecta. In the lime industry, limestone is a general term for rocks that contain 80% or more of calcium or magnesium carbonates, including marble, chalk, oolite, and marl. Uses include lime mortar, lime plaster, lime render, lime-ash floors, tabby concrete, whitewash, silicate mineral paint, and limestone blocks which may be of many types.
Limestone has numerous uses: as a building material, an essential component of concrete (Portland cement), as aggregate for the base of roads, as white pigment or filler in products such as toothpaste or paints, as a chemical feedstock for the production of lime, as a soil conditioner, or as a popular decorative addition to rock gardens.

Lime kiln

limekilnlime kilnslime burning
Burning (calcination) of these minerals in a lime kiln converts them into the highly caustic material burnt lime, unslaked lime or quicklime (calcium oxide) and, through subsequent addition of water, into the less caustic (but still strongly alkaline) slaked lime or hydrated lime (calcium hydroxide, Ca(OH) 2 ), the process of which is called slaking of lime.
A lime kiln is a kiln used for the calcination of limestone (calcium carbonate) to produce the form of lime called quicklime (calcium oxide).

Calcination

calcinedcalciningcalcine
Burning (calcination) of these minerals in a lime kiln converts them into the highly caustic material burnt lime, unslaked lime or quicklime (calcium oxide) and, through subsequent addition of water, into the less caustic (but still strongly alkaline) slaked lime or hydrated lime (calcium hydroxide, Ca(OH) 2 ), the process of which is called slaking of lime.
The process of calcination derives its name from the Latin calcinare (to burn lime) due to its most common application, the decomposition of calcium carbonate (limestone) to calcium oxide (lime) and carbon dioxide, in order to create cement.

Calcium oxide

quicklimelimeCaO
Lime is a calcium-containing inorganic mineral composed primarily of oxides, and hydroxide, usually calcium oxide and/ or calcium hydroxide. Burning (calcination) of these minerals in a lime kiln converts them into the highly caustic material burnt lime, unslaked lime or quicklime (calcium oxide) and, through subsequent addition of water, into the less caustic (but still strongly alkaline) slaked lime or hydrated lime (calcium hydroxide, Ca(OH) 2 ), the process of which is called slaking of lime.
The broadly used term "lime" connotes calcium-containing inorganic materials, in which carbonates, oxides and hydroxides of calcium, silicon, magnesium, aluminium, and iron predominate.

Marl

marlstonemarlsMergel
In the lime industry, limestone is a general term for rocks that contain 80% or more of calcium or magnesium carbonates, including marble, chalk, oolite, and marl.
Marl or marlstone is a calcium carbonate or lime-rich mud or mudstone which contains variable amounts of clays and silt.

Agricultural lime

limeagriculturalfarmers
When the term is encountered in an agricultural context, it usually refers to agricultural lime, which is crushed limestone, not a product of a lime kiln.
Unlike the types of lime called quicklime (calcium oxide) and slaked lime (calcium hydroxide), powdered limestone does not require lime burning in a lime kiln; it only requires milling.

Calcite

calcareouscalciticcalcite crystals
Uncommon sources of lime include coral, sea shells, calcite and ankerite.
Calcite is derived from the German Calcit, a term coined in the 19th century from the Latin word for lime, calx (genitive calcis) with the suffix -ite used to name minerals.

Carbonate

carbonatescarbonaceousCO 3
In the lime industry, limestone is a general term for rocks that contain 80% or more of calcium or magnesium carbonates, including marble, chalk, oolite, and marl.
Carbonates are widely used in industry, e.g. in iron smelting, as a raw material for Portland cement and lime manufacture, in the composition of ceramic glazes, and more.

Lime mortar

limemortarlime-based mortar
Uses include lime mortar, lime plaster, lime render, lime-ash floors, tabby concrete, whitewash, silicate mineral paint, and limestone blocks which may be of many types.
Lime mortar is composed of lime and an aggregate such as sand, mixed with water.

Dolomite (rock)

dolomitedolomiticmagnesian limestone
Further classification is by composition as high calcium, argillaceous (clayey), silicious, conglomerate, magnesian, dolomite, and other limestones.
Most dolomites formed as a magnesium replacement of limestone or lime mud before lithification.

Silicate mineral paint

Silicate paintsilicate paintswater-glass painting
Uses include lime mortar, lime plaster, lime render, lime-ash floors, tabby concrete, whitewash, silicate mineral paint, and limestone blocks which may be of many types.
Two relevant mineral binders play a role in the field of colors: Lime and silicate.

Tabby concrete

tabbytapiaTabby cement
Uses include lime mortar, lime plaster, lime render, lime-ash floors, tabby concrete, whitewash, silicate mineral paint, and limestone blocks which may be of many types.
Tabby is a type of concrete made by burning oyster shells to create lime, then mixing it with water, sand, ash and broken oyster shells.

Lime render

Uses include lime mortar, lime plaster, lime render, lime-ash floors, tabby concrete, whitewash, silicate mineral paint, and limestone blocks which may be of many types.
Lime render is the first coat of lime "plaster or the like" applied to the external surfaces of traditionally-built stone or brick buildings.

Hydraulic lime

hydrauliclimenatural hydraulic lime
Hydraulic lime is also called water lime.
Hydraulic lime (HL) is a general term for varieties of lime (calcium oxide), or slaked lime (calcium hydroxide), used to make lime mortar which set through hydration.

Lime-ash floor

lime-ash plaster
Uses include lime mortar, lime plaster, lime render, lime-ash floors, tabby concrete, whitewash, silicate mineral paint, and limestone blocks which may be of many types.

Stucco

renderedrenderstuccoed
Type S lime is almost always dolomitic lime, hydrated under heat and pressure in an autoclave, and used in mortar, render, stucco, and plaster.
Until the latter part of the nineteenth century, it was common that plaster, which was used inside a building, and stucco, which was used outside, would consist of the same primary materials: lime and sand (which are also used in mortar).

Pozzolana

pozzolanpozzolanic ashpozzolanic cement
Artificial hydraulic lime is made by adding forms of silica or alumina such as clay to the limestone during firing, or by adding a pozzolana to pure lime.
Typically it was very thoroughly mixed two-to-one with lime just prior to mixing with water.

Calcisol

Calcisols
A Calcisol in the World Reference Base for Soil Resources (WRB) is a soil with a substantial secondary accumulation of lime.

Plasterwork

plasteringplasteredplaster
The Romans used mixtures of lime and sand to build up preparatory layers over which finer applications of gypsum, lime, sand and marble dust were made; pozzolanic materials were sometimes added to produce a more rapid set.

Soda–lime glass

soda-lime glasssoda lime glasssoda glass
To provide for better chemical durability, the "lime" is also added.

Animal glue

hide gluefish glueglue
The stock is then treated with lime to break down the hides.

Sascab

It was used by the ancient Maya in place of (or as a partial replacement for) lime in some applications, without needing to be "burned."