Limes Germanicus

LimesRhine frontierGerman frontierGermanic Limesnorthern borderRoman LimesUpper Germanic & Rhaetian LimesUpper Germanic-Rhaetian LimesDanube frontierDonau-Iller-Rhine-Limes
The Limes Germanicus (Latin for Germanic frontier) is the name given in modern times to a line of frontier (limes) fortifications that bounded the ancient Roman provinces of Germania Inferior, Germania Superior and Raetia, dividing the Roman Empire and the unsubdued Germanic tribes from the years 83 to about 260 AD.wikipedia
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Rhine

Rhine RiverRiver RhineRhine Valley
At its height, the Limes Germanicus stretched from the North Sea outlet of the Rhine to near Regensburg (Castra Regina) on the Danube.
The Rhine and the Danube formed most of the northern inland frontier of the Roman Empire and, since those days, the Rhine has been a vital and navigable waterway carrying trade and goods deep inland.

Limes

Frontiers of the Roman EmpireRoman LimesLimes Romanus
The Limes Germanicus (Latin for Germanic frontier) is the name given in modern times to a line of frontier (limes) fortifications that bounded the ancient Roman provinces of Germania Inferior, Germania Superior and Raetia, dividing the Roman Empire and the unsubdued Germanic tribes from the years 83 to about 260 AD.

Germania Superior

Upper GermanyGermania PrimaSuperior
The Limes Germanicus (Latin for Germanic frontier) is the name given in modern times to a line of frontier (limes) fortifications that bounded the ancient Roman provinces of Germania Inferior, Germania Superior and Raetia, dividing the Roman Empire and the unsubdued Germanic tribes from the years 83 to about 260 AD.
It comprised the Middle Rhine, bordering on the Limes Germanicus, and on the Alpine province of Raetia to the south-east.

Raetia

RhaetiaRaetia primaCount of Raetia
The Limes Germanicus (Latin for Germanic frontier) is the name given in modern times to a line of frontier (limes) fortifications that bounded the ancient Roman provinces of Germania Inferior, Germania Superior and Raetia, dividing the Roman Empire and the unsubdued Germanic tribes from the years 83 to about 260 AD.
Later the Limes Germanicus marked the northern boundary, stretching for 166 km north of the Danube.

Netherlands

DutchThe NetherlandsHolland
Notable towns would arise along the Limes Germanicus: Nijmegen and Voorburg.

Miltenberg

Miltenberg (Germany)Miltenberg am MainMiltenberg-am-Main
In the 150s, the Roman Empire pushed outwards its fortified border in Germania, establishing the Upper Germanic-Rhaetian Limes which replaced the Odenwald-Neckar-Limes.

Upper Germanic-Rhaetian Limes

Rhaetian LimesLimesUpper Germanic Limes
Originally there were numerous Limes walls, which were then connected to form the Upper Germanic Limes along the Rhine and the Rhaetian Limes along the Danube.
Together with the Lower Germanic Limes it forms part of the Limes Germanicus.

Kromme Rijn

Along its banks the Romans built their frontier castella part of the Limes Germanicus.

Saalburg

SaalburgmuseumRoman Empire Army Camp SaalburgSaalburg Castle
The Saalburg is a reconstructed fortification and museum of the Limes near Frankfurt. Among the blockhouses was one which by various enlargements and refoundations grew into the well-known Saalburg fort on the Taunus near Bad Homburg.
It is a cohort fort, part of the Limes Germanicus, the Roman linear border fortification of the German provinces.

Nederrijn

Lower RhineNether RhineRhine
The once-important but now small Kromme Rijn branch (in Roman times part of the Limes Germanicus and border river of the Roman Empire) carries the name "Rhine" towards the city of Utrecht.

Lorch (Württemberg)

Lorch
During the Roman Era, it served as a vital link in the Limes Germanicus.

Navis lusoria

navis lusoriae
Support was provided to some degree by fast river boats, the navis lusoria being the standard type, that could reach outposts or points of crisis quickly.
Nimble, graceful, and of shallow draft, such a vessel was used on northern rivers close to the Limes Germanicus, the Germanic border, and thus saw service on the Rhine and the Danube.

Germanic peoples

GermanicGermanic tribesGermanic tribe
The Limes Germanicus (Latin for Germanic frontier) is the name given in modern times to a line of frontier (limes) fortifications that bounded the ancient Roman provinces of Germania Inferior, Germania Superior and Raetia, dividing the Roman Empire and the unsubdued Germanic tribes from the years 83 to about 260 AD.
The parts south of the Germanic limes came under Latin influence in the early centuries CE but were swiftly conquered by Germanic groups such as the Alemanni after the fall of the Western Roman Empire.

Lower Germanic Limes

Together with the Upper Germanic-Rhaetian Limes, the Lower Germanic Limes forms part of the Limes Germanicus

Kaiseraugst

Castrum RauracenseAsphardAugst
Watch towers were in sight contact and heavily fortified castra placed at important passes (e.g. Castrum Rauracense instead of the previously unwalled Augusta Raurica near to Basel) and in the hinterland of the frontier (e.g. Vindonissa in today's Switzerland).
About AD 300, following the loss of the Limes Germanicus and the right bank of the Rhine, the Roman army built a fort near the city of Augusta Raurica.

Utrecht

Utrecht, NetherlandsUtrecht (city)city of Utrecht
To consolidate the border, the Limes Germanicus defense line was constructed along the main branch of the river Rhine, which at that time flowed through a more northern bed compared to today (what is now the Kromme Rijn).

Matilo

Positioned on the southern banks of the Oude Rijn, it served to protect the Roman borders in the province of Germania inferior (Limes Germanicus).

Traiectum (Utrecht)

Traiectum
In the Roman Empire Traiectum was one of the forts in the lower Limes Germanicus defensive lines.

Antoninus Pius

Antonius PiusAntoninusAntonine
Either Hadrian or, more probably, his successor Antoninus Pius pushed out from the Odenwald and the Danube, and marked out a new frontier roughly parallel to, but in advance of these two lines, though sometimes, as on the Taunus, coinciding with the older line.
Also during his reign the governor of Upper Germany, probably Caius Popillius Carus Pedo, built new fortifications in the Agri Decumates, advancing the Limes Germanicus fifteen miles forward in his province and neighboring Raetia.

Albaniana (Roman fort)

Albaniana
It was part of the Lower Germanic Limes and separated the Roman Empire from tribal country to the north.

Taunus

Taunus mountainsHöheTannus Mountains
Among the blockhouses was one which by various enlargements and refoundations grew into the well-known Saalburg fort on the Taunus near Bad Homburg.
The Roman Limes was built across the Taunus.

Oude Rijn (Utrecht and South Holland)

Oude RijnOld RhineRhine
In Roman times, the river Oude Rijn, which was much wider, formed part of the Roman Empire's northern border (Limes Germanicus).

Domitian

Titus Flavius DomitianusAugustusEmperor Domitian
The second advance was made by Domitian about 83 AD.
His most significant military contribution was the development of the Limes Germanicus, which encompassed a vast network of roads, forts and watchtowers constructed along the Rhine river to defend the Empire.

Bodegraven

It was situated at the Roman Empire's northern border, the Limes Germanicus.

Rheinbrohl

A reconstructed Roman watchtower ("Römerturm 1") marks the beginning of the Germanic limes.