A report on WorldWideWeb and Line Mode Browser

WorldWideWeb, c. undefined 1994
Line Mode Browser displaying the German Wikipedia
WorldWideWeb, c. undefined 1994
Line Mode Browser displaying the German Wikipedia

In 1990, Tim Berners-Lee had already written the first browser, WorldWideWeb (later renamed to Nexus), but that program only worked on the proprietary software of NeXT computers, which were in limited use.

- Line Mode Browser

By this time, several others, including Bernd Pollermann, Robert Cailliau, Jean-François Groff, and visiting undergraduate student Nicola Pellow – who later wrote the Line Mode Browser – were involved in the project.

- WorldWideWeb
WorldWideWeb, c. undefined 1994

3 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Traditional browser arrangement: UI features above page content

Web browser

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Application software for accessing the World Wide Web or a local website.

Application software for accessing the World Wide Web or a local website.

Traditional browser arrangement: UI features above page content
Nicola Pellow and Tim Berners-Lee in 1992
Marc Andreessen, lead developer of Mosaic and Navigator, in 2007

The first web browser, called WorldWideWeb, was created in 1990 by Sir Tim Berners-Lee.

He then recruited Nicola Pellow to write the Line Mode Browser, which displayed web pages on dumb terminals.

Nicola Pellow with Tim Berners-Lee in their office at CERN in Switzerland, 1992

Nicola Pellow

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English mathematician and information scientist who was one of the nineteen members of the WWW Project at CERN working with Tim Berners-Lee.

English mathematician and information scientist who was one of the nineteen members of the WWW Project at CERN working with Tim Berners-Lee.

Nicola Pellow with Tim Berners-Lee in their office at CERN in Switzerland, 1992

Almost immediately after Berners-Lee completed the WorldWideWeb web browser for the NeXT platform Pellow was tasked with creating a browser using her recently acquired skills in the C programming language.

The outcome was that she wrote the first generic Line Mode Browser that could run on non-NeXT systems.

Libwww

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Modular client-side web API for Unix and Windows.

Modular client-side web API for Unix and Windows.

In 1991 and 1992, Tim Berners-Lee and a student at CERN named Jean-François Groff rewrote various components of the original WorldWideWeb browser for the NeXTstep operating system in portable C code, in order to demonstrate the potential of the World Wide Web.

From 1995 onwards, the Line Mode Browser was no longer released separately, but part of the libwww package.