A report on Linear alternator

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Essentially a linear motor used as an electrical generator.

- Linear alternator
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3 related topics with Alpha

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Alternators made in 1909 by Ganz Works in the power generating hall of a Russian hydroelectric station (photograph by Prokudin-Gorsky, 1911).

Alternator

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Electrical generator that converts mechanical energy to electrical energy in the form of alternating current.

Electrical generator that converts mechanical energy to electrical energy in the form of alternating current.

Alternators made in 1909 by Ganz Works in the power generating hall of a Russian hydroelectric station (photograph by Prokudin-Gorsky, 1911).
In what is considered the first industrial use of alternating current in 1891, workmen pose with a Westinghouse alternator at the Ames Hydroelectric Generating Plant. This machine was used as a generator producing 3,000-volt, 133-hertz, single-phase AC, and an identical machine 3 miles away was used as an AC motor.
Diagram of a simple alternator with a rotating magnetic core (rotor) and stationary wire (stator) also showing the current induced in the stator by the rotating magnetic field of the rotor.
Alternator mounted on an automobile engine with a serpentine belt pulley (belt not present.)

Occasionally, a linear alternator or a rotating armature with a stationary magnetic field is used.

A Haitian boy turns the crank on his crank-powered flashlight radio. Mechanically powered flashlights were distributed by aid organizations to survivors of the 2010 Haiti earthquake since electric power was lost for a long period.

Mechanically powered flashlight

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Flashlight that is powered by electricity generated by the muscle power of the user, so it does not need replacement of batteries, or recharging from an electrical source.

Flashlight that is powered by electricity generated by the muscle power of the user, so it does not need replacement of batteries, or recharging from an electrical source.

A Haitian boy turns the crank on his crank-powered flashlight radio. Mechanically powered flashlights were distributed by aid organizations to survivors of the 2010 Haiti earthquake since electric power was lost for a long period.
A linear induction flashlight is charged by shaking it along its long axis, causing a magnet (visible at right) to slide through a coil of wire (center) to generate electricity.
German dynamo flashlight from World War I. Pulling the pull-chain spun a flywheel, generating electricity to light the bulb on the front for about 5 seconds.

This design contains a linear electrical generator which charges a supercapacitor which functions similarly to a rechargeable battery when the flashlight is shaken lengthwise.

A model of a Stirling engine showing its simplicity. Unlike the steam engine or internal combustion engine, it has no valves or timing train. The heat source (not shown )  would be placed under the brass cylinder.

Stirling engine

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Heat engine that is operated by the cyclic compression and expansion of air or other gas between different temperatures, resulting in a net conversion of heat energy to mechanical work.

Heat engine that is operated by the cyclic compression and expansion of air or other gas between different temperatures, resulting in a net conversion of heat energy to mechanical work.

A model of a Stirling engine showing its simplicity. Unlike the steam engine or internal combustion engine, it has no valves or timing train. The heat source (not shown )  would be placed under the brass cylinder.
Illustration from Robert Stirling's 1816 patent application of the air engine design that later came to be known as the Stirling Engine
A typical late nineteenth/early twentieth century water pumping engine by the Rider-Ericsson Engine Company
Philips MP1002CA Stirling generator of 1951
Stirling engine running
A pressure/volume graph of the idealized Stirling cycle.
Point focus parabolic mirror with Stirling engine at its centre and its solar tracker at Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) in Spain.
Alpha-type Stirling engine. There are two cylinders. The expansion cylinder (red) is maintained at a high temperature while the compression cylinder (blue) is cooled. The passage between the two cylinders contains the regenerator
Beta-type Stirling engine, with only one cylinder, hot at one end and cold at the other. A loose-fitting displacer shunts the air between the hot and cold ends of the cylinder. A power piston at the open end of the cylinder drives the flywheel
Top view of two rotating displacers powering the horizontal piston. Regenerators and radiator removed for clarity
Various free-piston Stirling configurations... F. "free cylinder", G. Fluidyne, H. "double-acting" Stirling (typically 4 cylinders).
Cutaway of the flat Stirling engine:
10 - Hot cylinder.
11 - A volume of hot cylinder.
12 - B volume of hot cylinder.
17 - Warm piston diaphragm.
18 - Heating medium.
19 - Piston rod.
20 - Cold cylinder.
21 - A Volume of cold cylinder.
22 - B Volume of cold cylinder.
27 - Cold piston diaphragm.
28 - Coolant medium.
30 - Working cylinder.
31 - A volume of working cylinder.
32 - B volume of working cylinder.
37 - Working piston diaphragm.
41 - Regenerator mass of A volume.
42 - Regenerator mass of B volume.
48 - Heat accumulator.
50 - Thermal insulation.
60 - Generator.
63 - Magnetic circuit.
64 - Electrical winding.
70 - Channel connecting warm and working cylinders.
A modern Stirling engine and generator set with 55 kW electrical output, for combined heat and power applications.
Dish Stirling from SES
Cut-away diagram of a rhombic drive beta configuration Stirling engine design:
1 - Hot cylinder wall
2 - Cold cylinder wall
3 - Coolant inlet and outlet pipes
4 - Thermal insulation separating the two cylinder ends
5 - Displacer piston
6 - Power piston
7 - Linkage crank and flywheels
Not shown: Heat source and heat sinks. In this design the displacer piston is constructed without a purpose-built regenerator.

In a free-piston device, energy may be added or removed by an electrical linear alternator, pump or other coaxial device.