List of Ancien Régime dioceses of France

ecclesiastical bishoprics and diocesesprovince of Arlesprovince of Narbonneecclesiastical province of Narbonneprovince of VienneAncien Régime diocesesecclesiastical province of RouenFrench bishoprics and diocesesoriginal dioceseprovince of Tarentaise
French Ancien Régime Roman Catholic dioceses and ecclesiastical provinces were heirs of Late Roman civitates (themselves created out of Gaulish tribes) and provinces.wikipedia
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Ancien Régime

ancien regimeOld RegimeFrance
French Ancien Régime Roman Catholic dioceses and ecclesiastical provinces were heirs of Late Roman civitates (themselves created out of Gaulish tribes) and provinces.
Administrative (including taxation), legal (parlement), judicial, and ecclesiastic divisions and prerogatives frequently overlapped (for example, French bishoprics and dioceses rarely coincided with administrative divisions).

Roman Gaul

GaulGallo-RomanGallic
All the same, in 1789, on the eve of the French Revolution, the ecclesiastical map of France still very much recalled that of Roman Gaul.
These administrative groupings would be taken over by the Romans in their system of local control, and these civitates would also be the basis of France's eventual division into ecclesiastical bishoprics and dioceses, which would remain in place—with slight changes—until the French revolution.

Gaul

GallicGalliaGaulish
French Ancien Régime Roman Catholic dioceses and ecclesiastical provinces were heirs of Late Roman civitates (themselves created out of Gaulish tribes) and provinces.
These administrative groupings would be taken over by the Romans in their system of local control, and these civitates would also be the basis of France's eventual division into ecclesiastical bishoprics and dioceses, which would remain in place—with slight changes—until the French Revolution.

Roman Catholic Diocese of Montauban

Bishop of MontaubanDiocese of MontaubanMontauban
Diocese of Montauban — Created 1317
Pope John XXII, by the Bull Salvator (25 June 1317), separated the see of Toulouse from the ecclesiastical province of Narbonne, making the see of Toulouse an archiepiscopal see, and giving it four dioceses as suffragans that were created from within its territory: the Diocese of Montauban, the Diocese of St.-Papoul, the Diocese of Rieux, and the Diocese of Lombez.

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Paris

archbishop of Parisbishop of ParisParis
Archdiocese of Paris — Became a metropolitan see in 1622.
The original diocese is traditionally thought to have been created in the 3rd century by St. Denis and corresponded with the Civitas Parisiorum; it was elevated to an archdiocese on October 20, 1622.

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vienne

bishop of Viennearchbishop of VienneVienne
Archdiocese of Vienne
In 1120 Calixtus II, who had been Bishop of Vienne, decided that the Archbishop of Vienne should have for suffragans the Bishop of Grenoble, Bishop of Valence, Bishop of Die, Bishop of Viviers, Bishop of Geneva, and Bishop of Maurienne; that the Archbishop of Tarantaise should obey him, notwithstanding the fact that this archbishop himself had suffragans, that he should exercise the primacy over the province of Bourges, province of Narbonne, province of Bordeaux, province of Aix, province of Auch and province of Embrun, and that, as the metropolitans of both provinces already bore the title of primate, the Archbishop of Vienne should be known as the "Primate of Primates".

Catholic Church

CatholicRoman CatholicRoman Catholicism
French Ancien Régime Roman Catholic dioceses and ecclesiastical provinces were heirs of Late Roman civitates (themselves created out of Gaulish tribes) and provinces.

Diocese

bishopricarchdiocesediocesan
French Ancien Régime Roman Catholic dioceses and ecclesiastical provinces were heirs of Late Roman civitates (themselves created out of Gaulish tribes) and provinces.

Civitas

Roman towncivitatestown
French Ancien Régime Roman Catholic dioceses and ecclesiastical provinces were heirs of Late Roman civitates (themselves created out of Gaulish tribes) and provinces.

Albigensian Crusade

crusadecrusade against the AlbigensiansAlbigensian
For instance, the Albigensian Crusade entailed the creation of many new dioceses in the early 14th century.

French Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionaryrevolutionary France
All the same, in 1789, on the eve of the French Revolution, the ecclesiastical map of France still very much recalled that of Roman Gaul.

Belgium

🇧🇪BelgianBEL
This explains why many dioceses and provinces did not coincide with French borders, with their head cities lying in present-day Belgium, Germany or Switzerland.

Germany

🇩🇪GermanGER
This explains why many dioceses and provinces did not coincide with French borders, with their head cities lying in present-day Belgium, Germany or Switzerland.

Switzerland

Swiss🇨🇭SWI
This explains why many dioceses and provinces did not coincide with French borders, with their head cities lying in present-day Belgium, Germany or Switzerland.

Departments of France

departmentdépartementdepartments
In 1790, this map was entirely revised to fit the new administrative map: dioceses were now to coincide with départements (the new administrative units).

Drôme

26Département DrômeDepartment of Drôme
For instance, in the département of the Drôme, only the city of Valence retained its bishop, the former episcopal sees of Die and Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux being suppressed, but the bishop retained the title of bishop of Valence, Die and Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux.

Valence (city)

ValenceValentiaValence, Drome: Libélo
For instance, in the département of the Drôme, only the city of Valence retained its bishop, the former episcopal sees of Die and Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux being suppressed, but the bishop retained the title of bishop of Valence, Die and Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux.