List of English monarchs

King of EnglandEnglish CrownMonarchKings of EnglandKingEnglish throneEnglishKing of the EnglishEnglish monarchsQueen of England
This list of kings and queens of the Kingdom of England begins with Alfred the Great, who initially ruled Wessex, one of the seven Anglo-Saxon kingdoms which later made up modern England.wikipedia
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Alfred the Great

King AlfredAlfredKing Alfred the Great
This list of kings and queens of the Kingdom of England begins with Alfred the Great, who initially ruled Wessex, one of the seven Anglo-Saxon kingdoms which later made up modern England.
886 and King of the Anglo-Saxons from c.

Æthelstan

AthelstanKing AthelstanAthelstan of England
His son Edward the Elder conquered the eastern Danelaw, but Edward's son Æthelstan became the first king to rule the whole of England when he conquered Northumbria in 927, and he is regarded by some modern historians as the first true king of England.
undefined 894 – 27 October 939) was King of the Anglo-Saxons from 924 to 927 and King of the English from 927 to 939 when he died.

Principality of Wales

WalesPrincipalityPrincipality of North Wales
The Principality of Wales was incorporated into the Kingdom of England under the Statute of Rhuddlan in 1284, and in 1301 King Edward I invested his eldest son, the future King Edward II, as Prince of Wales.
However, for a few generations, specifically the period from its foundation in 1216 to the conquest of Wales by Edward I in 1284, it was de facto independent under a Welsh prince of Wales, albeit one who swore fealty to the king of England.

Kingdom of England

EnglandEnglishAnglo
This list of kings and queens of the Kingdom of England begins with Alfred the Great, who initially ruled Wessex, one of the seven Anglo-Saxon kingdoms which later made up modern England. The Principality of Wales was incorporated into the Kingdom of England under the Statute of Rhuddlan in 1284, and in 1301 King Edward I invested his eldest son, the future King Edward II, as Prince of Wales.
Dynastically, all English monarchs after 1066 ultimately claim descent from the Normans; the distinction of the Plantagenets is merely conventional, beginning with Henry II (reigned 1154–1189) as from that time, the Angevin kings became "more English in nature"; the houses of Lancaster and York are both Plantagenet cadet branches, the Tudor dynasty claimed descent from Edward III via John Beaufort and James VI and I of the House of Stuart claimed descent from Henry VII via Margaret Tudor.

Prince of Wales

The Prince of WalesPrinces of WalesPrince
The Principality of Wales was incorporated into the Kingdom of England under the Statute of Rhuddlan in 1284, and in 1301 King Edward I invested his eldest son, the future King Edward II, as Prince of Wales.
One of the last Welsh princes, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, was killed in battle in 1282 by Edward I, King of England, whose son Edward (born in Caernarfon Castle in 1284) was invested as the first English Prince of Wales in 1301.

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
By royal proclamation, James styled himself "King of Great Britain", but no such kingdom was actually created until 1707, when England and Scotland united to form the new Kingdom of Great Britain, with a single British parliament sitting at Westminster, during the reign of Queen Anne.
The former kingdoms had been in personal union since James VI of Scotland became King of England and King of Ireland in 1603 following the death of Elizabeth I, bringing about the "Union of the Crowns".

Eadwig

King EadwigEadwig of EnglandKing Edwy
undefined 940 – October 959), sometimes called the All-Fair, was King of England from 955 until his premature death.

Eadred

EdredKing EadredEadred of England
Eadred (also Edred) (923 – 23 November 955) was King of the English from 946 until his death.

Edward the Martyr

EdwardEdward IIKing Edward
962 – 18 March 978) was King of England from 975 until he was murdered in 978.

Edgar the Peaceful

King EdgarEdgarEdgar of England
943 – 8 July 975), known as the Peaceful or the Peaceable, was King of England from 959 until his death.

Æthelred the Unready

Ethelred the UnreadyÆthelred IIÆthelred
undefined 966 – 23 April 1016), known as the Unready, was King of the English from 978 to 1013 and again from 1014 until his death.

Edmund Ironside

Edmund IIEdmund II of EnglandEdmund
Following the decisive Battle of Assandun on 18 October 1016, King Edmund signed a treaty with Cnut (Canute) under which all of England except for Wessex would be controlled by Cnut.
990 – 30 November 1016; Ēadmund Isernside, Edmundus; sometimes also known as Edmund II) was King of England from 23 April to 30 November 1016.

Harold Harefoot

Harold IHarold I of EnglandKing Harold I
undefined 1016 – 17 March 1040), also known as Harold Harefoot, was King of England from 1035 to 1040.

London

London, EnglandLondon, United KingdomLondon, UK
After the Battle of Hastings on 14 October 1066, William the Conqueror made permanent the recent removal of the capital from Winchester to London.
After winning the Battle of Hastings, William, Duke of Normandy was crowned King of England in the newly completed Westminster Abbey on Christmas Day 1066.

Harthacnut

HarthacanuteCanute the HardyCanute III
After Harthacnut, there was a brief Saxon Restoration between 1042 and 1066.
Harthacnut (Hardeknud; "Tough-knot"; c. 1018 – 8 June 1042), sometimes referred to as Canute III, was King of Denmark from 1035 to 1042 and King of England from 1040 to 1042.

Ælfgifu of Northampton

ÆlfgifuAelgifu of Northampton
undefined 990 – after 1036) was the first wife of Cnut the Great, King of England and Denmark, and mother of Harold Harefoot, King of England.

Palace of Westminster

Houses of ParliamentWestminster HallWestminster
The first royal palace constructed on the site dated from the 11th century, and Westminster became the primary residence of the Kings of England until fire destroyed much of the complex in 1512.

Edward the Exile

EdwardEdward the AthelingEdward Ætheling
Following the death of Harold Godwinson at Hastings, the Anglo-Saxon Witenagemot elected as king Edgar the Ætheling, the son of Edward the Exile and grandson of Edmund Ironside.
Edward the Exile (1016 – 19 April 1057), also called Edward Ætheling, was the son of King Edmund Ironside and of Ealdgyth.

Harald Hardrada

Harald HardrådeHarald III of NorwayHarald III
Among them were Harold Godwinson, recognised as king by the Witenagemot after the death of Edward the Confessor, as well as Harald Hardrada, King of Norway who claimed to be the rightful heir of Harthacnut, and Duke William II of Normandy, vassal to the King of France, and first cousin once-removed of Edward the Confessor.
In addition, he unsuccessfully claimed the Danish throne until 1064 and the English throne in 1066.

Westminster Abbey

WestminsterAbbey of WestminsterAbbot of Westminster
William was crowned King William I of England on Christmas Day 1066, in Westminster Abbey, and is today known as William the Conqueror, William the Bastard or William I.
It is one of the United Kingdom's most notable religious buildings and the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs.

Norman conquest of England

Norman ConquestConquestNorman invasion
Godwinson successfully repelled the invasion by Hardrada, but ultimately lost the throne of England in the Norman conquest of England.
William's claim to the English throne derived from his familial relationship with the childless Anglo-Saxon king Edward the Confessor, who may have encouraged William's hopes for the throne.

Henry I of England

Henry IKing Henry IKing Henry I of England
Henry I left no legitimate male heirs, his son William Adelin having died in the White Ship disaster.
1068 – 1 December 1135), also known as Henry Beauclerc, was King of England from 1100 to his death in 1135.

Edgar Ætheling

Edgar the ÆthelingEdgar AthelingEdgar Aetheling
Following the death of Harold Godwinson at Hastings, the Anglo-Saxon Witenagemot elected as king Edgar the Ætheling, the son of Edward the Exile and grandson of Edmund Ironside.
He was elected King of England by the Witenagemot in 1066, but never crowned.

William II of England

William RufusWilliam IIKing William II
1056 – 2 August 1100), the third son of William the Conqueror, was King of England from 26 September 1087 until 2 August 1100, with powers over Normandy, and influence in Scotland.

Stephen, King of England

King StephenStephenStephen of England
Before naming Matilda as heir, he had been in negotiations to name his nephew Stephen of Blois as his heir.
Stephen (1092/6 – 25 October 1154), often referred to as Stephen of Blois, was King of England from 22 December 1135 to his death.