List of German expressions in English

GermanismVerbotenexpressions in EnglishGermanGerman expression used in EnglishGerman expressions in EnglishGerman loan wordsGerman loanwordsGermanismsliederkranz
A German expression in English is a German loanword, term, phrase, or quotation incorporated into the English language.wikipedia
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Methodenstreit

(In German-speaking countries, the original of this Germanism is not specific to the one controversy—which is likely to be specified as Methodenstreit der Nationalökonomie, i.e.

Forest dieback

diebackWaldsterbenAir pollution
Forest dieback (also "Waldsterben", a German loan word) is a condition in trees or woody plants in which peripheral parts are killed, either by pathogens, parasites or due to conditions like acid rain and drought.

German language

GermanGerman-languageGerman-speaking
A German expression in English is a German loanword, term, phrase, or quotation incorporated into the English language.

Führer

FuhrerFührer und ReichskanzlerEin Volk, ein Reich, ein Führer

Hamburger

hamburgersburgersburger
Some of the expressions are relatively common (e.g. hamburger), but most are comparatively rare.

Loanword

loanwordsloan wordborrowed
In many cases the loanword has assumed a meaning substantially different from its German forebear. Typically, English spellings of German loanwords suppress any umlauts (the superscript, double-dot diacritic in Ä, Ö, Ü, ä, ö and ü) of the original word or replace the umlaut letters with Ae, Oe, Ue, ae, oe, ue, respectively (as is done commonly in German speaking countries when the umlaut is not available; the origin of the umlaut was a superscript E).

West Germanic languages

West GermanicWest Germanic languageWest
English and German both are West Germanic languages, though their relationship has been obscured by the lexical influence of Old Norse and Norman French (as a consequence of the Norman conquest of England in 1066) on English as well as the High German consonant shift.

Lexicon

lexicallexicallylexicons
English and German both are West Germanic languages, though their relationship has been obscured by the lexical influence of Old Norse and Norman French (as a consequence of the Norman conquest of England in 1066) on English as well as the High German consonant shift.

Old Norse

NorseOld IcelandicOld West Norse
English and German both are West Germanic languages, though their relationship has been obscured by the lexical influence of Old Norse and Norman French (as a consequence of the Norman conquest of England in 1066) on English as well as the High German consonant shift.

Norman language

NormanNorman FrenchNorman-French
English and German both are West Germanic languages, though their relationship has been obscured by the lexical influence of Old Norse and Norman French (as a consequence of the Norman conquest of England in 1066) on English as well as the High German consonant shift.

Norman conquest of England

Norman ConquestConquestNorman invasion
English and German both are West Germanic languages, though their relationship has been obscured by the lexical influence of Old Norse and Norman French (as a consequence of the Norman conquest of England in 1066) on English as well as the High German consonant shift.

High German consonant shift

High German sound shiftRhenish Fansecond Germanic consonant shift
English and German both are West Germanic languages, though their relationship has been obscured by the lexical influence of Old Norse and Norman French (as a consequence of the Norman conquest of England in 1066) on English as well as the High German consonant shift.

Germanic umlaut

umlauti-mutationRückumlaut
Typically, English spellings of German loanwords suppress any umlauts (the superscript, double-dot diacritic in Ä, Ö, Ü, ä, ö and ü) of the original word or replace the umlaut letters with Ae, Oe, Ue, ae, oe, ue, respectively (as is done commonly in German speaking countries when the umlaut is not available; the origin of the umlaut was a superscript E).

Diacritic

diacriticsdiacritical markdiacritical marks
Typically, English spellings of German loanwords suppress any umlauts (the superscript, double-dot diacritic in Ä, Ö, Ü, ä, ö and ü) of the original word or replace the umlaut letters with Ae, Oe, Ue, ae, oe, ue, respectively (as is done commonly in German speaking countries when the umlaut is not available; the origin of the umlaut was a superscript E).

Ä

Ǟa:
Typically, English spellings of German loanwords suppress any umlauts (the superscript, double-dot diacritic in Ä, Ö, Ü, ä, ö and ü) of the original word or replace the umlaut letters with Ae, Oe, Ue, ae, oe, ue, respectively (as is done commonly in German speaking countries when the umlaut is not available; the origin of the umlaut was a superscript E).

Ö

also spelledo:Öö
Typically, English spellings of German loanwords suppress any umlauts (the superscript, double-dot diacritic in Ä, Ö, Ü, ä, ö and ü) of the original word or replace the umlaut letters with Ae, Oe, Ue, ae, oe, ue, respectively (as is done commonly in German speaking countries when the umlaut is not available; the origin of the umlaut was a superscript E).

Ü

u-umlautǕǗ
Typically, English spellings of German loanwords suppress any umlauts (the superscript, double-dot diacritic in Ä, Ö, Ü, ä, ö and ü) of the original word or replace the umlaut letters with Ae, Oe, Ue, ae, oe, ue, respectively (as is done commonly in German speaking countries when the umlaut is not available; the origin of the umlaut was a superscript E).

Germanic languages

GermanicGermanic languageGerman
As languages, English and German descend from the common ancestor language West Germanic and further back to Proto-Germanic; because of this, some English words are essentially identical to their German lexical counterparts, either in spelling (Hand, Sand, Finger) or pronunciation ("fish" = Fisch, "mouse" = Maus), or both (Arm, Ring); these are excluded from this list.

Schutzstaffel

SSßNazi SS
German common nouns fully adopted into English are in general not initially capitalised, and the German letter "ß" is generally changed to "ss".